Who’s Who

 A

Name                                                                                                                            Pages           

 

Abrams, Bert                                                                                                                       52

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was listed in July 1945 as one of the officers scheduled to help with the forthcoming annual camp at Brean Down.  After the war he was best known for his sterling work in running the Broad Plain Lads’ Club, which he did for many years.

 

Alderman, Dorothy                                                                                                             53

She was born in Bristol about January 1916, the youngest daughter of William and Edith Alderman (nee Peglar), who had married in about December 1913.  Her elder sister Edith was born in about September 1914.  In 1911 her father was living with his parents (George and Ellen Alderman) at 12 Falmouth Road in Bishopston, from where her grandfather worked as a jobbing gardener.  Her father was training to be a grocer at this time, while his brother Fred was a railway porter and his sister Ivy was working in a draper’s shop.  His youngest sister Hilda was still at school at this time.  William served with the Gloucestershire Hussars during the First World War and saw dismounted action at Suvla Bay and Chocolate Hill in Gallipoli in August 1915, his unit eventually being reduced to just 80 men by October.  He then served in the Palestine Campaign for the rest of the war and eventually returned home on the 15th April 1919.  The Hall Mark records that Dorothy enlisted in the Women’s Services about July 1945.  She later met and married Patrick Ship in Southampton in about January 1946 and their son Rodney was born there the following September.  Their eldest daughter Sally was born in about December 1947, followed by Heather in March 1951, Marian in June 1956 and Wendy in December 1957.

 

Aldridge, Ted                                                                                                    22, 30, 34, 45

Edward John Aldridge was born in Bristol about January 1911 to Edward Edwin and Beatrice Aldridge who had married about 1891.  His father, who was born in Bermondsey in London, was an Able Seaman serving in the Royal Navy and in 1891 was living at the Naval Barracks at Hounslow in Middlesex shortly before he married Beatrice who originally came from Bristol.  I have not been able to trace the rest of his family but in April 1911, Ted was living with his mother who had rented 2 rooms at 29 Henry Street in the Barton Hill area of Bristol while his father serving at the Naval Base in Devonport.  He remained in Bristol and later married Eileen Neesam there in about September 1939.  Their daughter Patricia was born about September 1942, followed by their son Alan in December 1944.   Unfortunately Eileen died shortly after and Ted later remarried to Doris Fackrell in about June 1946.  I have not been able to trace any children from this second marriage.  Ted was called up early in the war and was serving with the 8th Army in the Middle East in January 1943 and was still there the following September.  However, he had returned to these shores by January 1944 to prepare for D Day and was with the BLA in Germany in February 1945.  He lived in Bristol most of his life but later moved to Sodbury in Gloucestershire where he died in about June 1970.

 

Allen, Ken                                                                                                                           57

Ken was born in Bristol about September 1927 to William and Mabel Allen, who had married there in about June 1926.  The family settled in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Ken later became a keen member of the Bible Class.   According to the Hall Mark, Ken was called up by the Army in about November 1945.  I have not been able to trace whether Ken ever married after completing his National Service.

 

Anderson, Ronald                                                                                       19, 25, 29, 45, 60

He was born about December 1913 to Alexander and Lillian Lucy Anderson (nee Goodway), who had married in Bristol about September 1906.  In 1911 his parents were living at 292 Cricklade Road in the Gorse Hill district of Swindon, together with his sisters Lily and Emily.  His father was working as an engine fitter in the Great Western Railway Works at this time.  The family later moved to Bristol and Ronald was living at Cambridge Road when the Second World War broke out and was playing at stand off for the Bristol Rugby Club at this time.  He met and married Bernice Gill in about December 1940 shortly before he was called up.  He was later posted to the Middle East in about September 1942 and then transferred to India in about March 1943 and by September he had written to the Rev Hall commenting on his references to lady secretaries.  At Christmas 1944 he had met a fellow serviceman at a carol concert organized by the RAF who had lived at Bishop Road before the war.  He was still in India in May 1945 but by March 1946 had been added to the list of those who had been demobilised since V E Day and was back making his name on the rugby pitch.  After the war he and Bernice moved to Sodbury in Gloucestershire, where his son James was born in about June 1947 and followed by his daughter in about September 1948.

 

Andrews, Geoff                                                                                                             33, 37

I have not been able to trace Geoff’s family history but it is known that he was living in Birchall Road in Bishopston when the Second World War began and had been head chorister at St Michael & All Angels Church during the mid thirties.  He went to Bristol University and qualified as a doctor, finishing up as a Consultant Pathologist in South Wales after the war.  He met and married Mary Pockson in September 1942 and their daughter Carol was born in about June 1946.  According to the Hall Mark he enlisted in the RAF during the war and was on Home Service in January 1944, before being posted to the Flying School at Monkton in Canada the following March.

 

Ash, Percy                                                                                                                     53, 59

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he enlisted in the RAMC about July 1945 and was posted to a hospital in India the following November, from where he made number of ribald comments about the Rev Hall’s car.

 

 

Atkinson, John                                                                                                                     53

John was born in Bristol about December 1920 the eldest son of Andrew and Elmyna Atkinson (nee Nutt), who had married there in about December 1919.  He was followed by Mary in December 1922, Lilian in September 1924, Andrew in June 1928 and Robert in September 1930.  John later married Jacqueline Strong in Bristol at the beginning of 1945 shortly before he enlisted in the RAF.  After the war they had 3 children – John born about March 1946, Alex about December 1948 and Jennifer about June 1953.

 

ATS                                                                                                                         22, 57

They were based at the Muller Homes during the war and made frequent use of the Church Canteen before they finally left in December 1945.

 

B

 

Bagot, Lt Col Charles Edward Kirwan, MC, MID                                                 15, 17, 19

Charles and his twin sister Gwendolin Frances were born in at Curraghmore near Athleague in County Roscommon, Ireland on the 3rd of June 1895 to Charles Henry and Georgina Louisa Bagot (nee Osbourne), who had married in Newry on the 10th of November 1891.  His other sister – Anna Georgina – was born in 1892.  He spent his childhood in Roscommon and joined the Army after leaving school, earning a commission in the Connaught Rangers.  He served with them in France from the 22nd of October 1915, before transferring to the Royal Field Artillery in December.  He was later awarded a MID and MC for his services in the First World War.  After the war he served under the Commander of Regimental Artillery of the 1st Infantry Division in Ireland before transferring to the Bishopston area of Bristol, where he became a member of St Michael and All Angels congregation.  Here he met and married Frances Isabel Finetta James on the 22nd of November 1928.  She was the daughter of Dr Angel James (see below), who lived at Elm Lea Avenue in the Stoke Bishop area of Bristol during the Second World War.  Her brother was the famous VC holder Manley Angel James (also below).

 

They had two children while they were living in Bristol – Charles who was born about March 1930 followed by Finetta in about March 1933.  By the time the Second World War broke out he had risen to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was in command of the 1st Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment in Burma when the Japanese invaded at the end of 1941.  He commanded the Battalion throughout the hard fought retreat in 1942 and remained with them when they were posted to India.   He was wounded in the Burma campaign but rejoined the Battalion and received an MID for his distinguished service between December 1941 and May 1942.  His wife and daughter remained with him in India after the retreat from Burma but his son, who was boarding in England at the time, remained there to continue his education.  A report on his actions in Burma was published (with photograph) in the Bristol Evening Post on the 29th of October 1942.   After he left the Army Charles lived in retirement in Stroud where he died aged 85 on the 2nd of July 1976, leaving his wife Frances who died some years later in November 1995 aged 91.

 

Baker, Doreen                                                                                                                     33

Known by her second name, Lillian Doreen Baker was born in Bristol about December 1924 to Edward and Ada Baker (nee Scrivens), who had married in Gloucester the previous January. Her sister Margaret followed later in about December 1926.  Doreen was a winner of the Richard’s Prize in January 1944 and later married Lawrence Gillard (see below) about June 1949.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Baker, Harold                                                                                                         34, 41, 52

Harold was born in Bristol about June 1925 to Alexander and Annie Baker (nee Hopes), who had married there about September 1915.  He was the second youngest child in the family, after his sister Doreen who was born about March 1929.  His brother George was the eldest having been born about September 1916 and was followed by Olive, Kathleen and Ronald who were born about June 1918, March 1920 and June 1923 respectively.  The family lived in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Harold was called up by the Army about 1943 and was in India by January 1944.  He was serving in Burma with the 14th Army by September 1944 and was back home by July 1945 presumably after having been invalided out as the war, which was still going on in South East Asia at that time.  After the war he met and married Ethel Goodman in Bristol about June 1947 and their sons Robert and Kenneth were born there about March 1949 and September 1952 respectively.

 

Baker, Margaret                                                                                                            46, 61

Sister of Doreen (see above), she joined the Women’s Services some time after Easter 1944.  She later married Reg Huckle in about June 1950 – see below- and their sons Richard and Peter were born about March 1954 and September 1956 respectively.

 

Baldwin, Arthur                                                                                                19, 21, 23, 43

Arthur was born in Bristol about September 1920 to Philip James and Florence Baldwin (nee Sheppard), who had married there in about September 1908.  In 1911 his parents were living in Swan Lane at Bell in the St George’s area of Bristol, together with his sister Margaret who had been born the previous year.  His older brother Conrad (see below) was born about March 1912 and his father was working as a joiner for a firm of shop fitters at this time.  The family later moved to Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Arthur later became a keen member of the Bible Class and earned the nickname “Eggie”.  He lived with his parents at 47 Ashgrove Road, in Ashley Down and before the Second World War worked as a member of staff at the Corn Street Branch of Barclay’s Bank.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Army during the war and was serving as an officer in a Tank Regiment in North Africa in September 1942.  He was listed as missing following the retreat to El Alamein but the Bristol Evening Post later reported that he had been wounded and taken prisoner to Greece, from where he was repatriated back home in about September 1944.  Shortly before going overseas Arthur had married Avis Priddle in Bristol about December 1941 and after the war their daughter Karen was born there in about March 1952.

 

 

Baldwin, Conrad                                                                                                     12, 21, 28

Brother of Arthur (see above) and known to his friends as “Olly”, he joined the RAF shortly after war was declared and was killed in action over Germany on the 14th of June 1941 aged 29 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Ball, Derek                                                                                                                          53

He was born in about 1927 at his home in Bishop Road in Bishopston to Walter and Elsie Ball (nee Pullen), who had married there in about December 1920.  His sister Margaret followed in about March 1932 and his younger brother Michael in about June 1934.  Derek was apparently delivered by the same midwife as attended the mother of his best friend David Nicholls – see below.  They were close friends from the age of 4 and played together and cycled on the local roads in Bishopston.  Their families initially worshipped at St Michal & All Angels Church but David later persuaded Derek to join him in the choir at the Church of the Good Shepherd, where he later became a server.  When the verger retired during the war, Derek took over the maintenance of the Church buildings and the Church Hall’s coke boiler, lighting up at the weekend and sometimes in the week as well.  He was called up some time after February 1945, and was posted to the RAMC aged 18.  He was demobbed in 1948 and once again became involved in the life of the Church of the Good Shepherd, continuing as head server and looking after the building.  He later married Diane Bannister in about March 1956 and their son Nicholas was born about September the following year.

 

He was a founder member of the Drama Club formed in 1950 and served as producer until 1974.  He also taught the older children in the Junior Church and later became a licensed sacristan, serving the sacrament to church members unable to attend services.  He served on the church council and finance committee, acting as church and hall secretary for 34 years before retiring in 1996.  He and Diane moved to Portishead in the 1970’s and then to Clevedon, eventually retiring from work in 1990.  He continued to travel to the Good Shepherd on Sundays and sometimes in the week for meetings and drama rehearsals.  Now in his late 80’s he is no longer able to travel up on Sunday mornings but still has fond memories of his life at the Good Shepherd.

 

Barker, John                                                                                                                       38

He was born in Bristol about June 1920, the youngest son of Charles and Mabel Barker who had married there in about December 1911.  He had an older brother Colin who was born about December 1912 and an older sister Stephanie born in Thornbury about December 1914.  The family lived in Bishopston between the wars and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, John joined the Army quite early in the war and had been invalided out by March 1944.  He had married Leonora Manning in about June 1941 and after the war they moved to Bath, where their daughter Mary was born in about September 1953.

 

Bateman, Leslie                                                                                                             46, 60

He was born in Bristol about June 1926 to Alfred and Lily Bateman (nee Barry), who had married in Wallingford about September 1925.  His sister Pauline followed shortly after in about June 1929.  Leslie was called up by the Army some time after September 1944 and was serving in Cairo in March 1946.  He does not appear to have married after the war ended.

 

Baugh, Freda                                                                                                                23, 52

Freda was born in Bristol about September 1912 to Frederick Spencer Gordon and Ethel Jane Baugh (nee Hicking), who had married there in about June 1908.  In 1911 her parents were living at 23 Downend Road in Horfield and her father was working as a clerk for a shipping company at this time.  They had 5 other children – twins Cecil Geoffrey and Doris Ethel (born about June 1910, although Cecil died shortly afterwards), Jean (born about September 1914), Florence (born about September 1916) and Barbara (born about March 1922).   During the Second World War Freda joined the WAAF in about January 1943 and was serving in the Far East by July 1945.  After returning home she married Amor Armstrong in Bristol in about September 1949.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Beavis, Dennis                                                                                                                                57

Brother of Gordon, Leslie and Kenneth, he was born in Bristol about June 1920 to Walter Beavis and his second wife Amy Ballard (nee Baker) who had married in Bristol about July 1913.  He was a keen scout and lived at Tyne Road before the war.  He served with the Army throughout most of the war and was demobbed in November 1945.  Dennis later met and married his wife Thelma but I have not yet determined when or where this took place, nor have I been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Beavis, Gordon                                                                                                                   28

Brother of Dennis, Leslie and Kenneth, he was born in Bristol about July 1916 to Walter Beavis and his second wife Amy Ballard. A former scout, he was serving with the Worcestershire Regiment on the outbreak of war but died of cancer in Bristol on the 26th of October 1940 aged 24 after being nursed by his half sister Amy Staplin (nee Ballard) – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Beavis, Leslie                                                                                              25, 30, 34, 41, 56

Brother of Gordon, Dennis and Kenneth, he was born in Bristol about July 1915 to Walter Beavis and his second wife Amy Ballard.  A former scout and choir member, he was serving with the Army in India in March 1943.  He later met up with fellow church member Maurice Philpott in Rawalpindi the following September. By January 1944 he had been promoted to Captain and was a Major by September.  He returned home about November 1945 having spent his entire service in India.  He had married Clarice Bryant in about December 1941 shortly before he left for India and their only son Graham was born in about June 1949.  Leslie eventually died in 1987 aged 72.

 

Beavis Kenneth                                                                                                                   57

A former scout and brother of Dennis, Gordon and Leslie, he was born in July 1917 to Walter Beavis and his second wife Amy Ballard.  He served with the Army for most of the war and was demobilised in November 1945.  He had married Margaret Doreen Jones in September 1936. They divorced in the 1970s and she died on the 3rd of January 1995 aged 79.  Kenneth did not re-marry and later died on the 15th of January 2011 aged 91.  They had 5 sons – David, Alan, Peter, Robert and Andrew.  Their son Alan later married Jennifer Mudge on the 6th of June 1964.

 

Beer, Dorothy                                                                                                                     43

Dorothy was born in Bristol about March 1920 to Wallace and Elsie Beer (nee Clark), who had married in Chipping Sodbury in about March 1916.  Her father was a regular soldier in the 2nd Grenadier Guards who went out to France on the 22nd of August 1914 and served on the Western Front throughout the whole of the First World War.  He would have seen action at the battles of Mons, Marne, Aisne and 1st Ypres in 1914 when his Battalion was reduced to a cadre.  In 1915 he saw action at Festubert and Loos followed by the Somme and 3rd Ypres and Cambrai in 1916 and 1917.  He would have fought through the desperate battles of the retreat from the Somme in March 1918 followed by the advance to victory on the Hindenburg Line, the Selle and Sambre before forming part of the Army of Occupation on the Rhine in 1919.  Her elder sister Vera was born in Chipping Sodbury about March 1917, while her brothers Verley and Ronald were born in Bristol in September 1921 and December 1922 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, the Rev Hall officiated at Dorothy’s marriage to Albert Dark at St Michael & all Angels Church in about June 1944.  They later had 2 children, Maureen born in about December 1945 and Malcolm born in December 1946.

 

Beeston, Reginald                                                                                                               60

According to the Hall Mark he was serving in the Middle East in March 1946 but I have not been able to trace any other information about him.

 

BEF                                                                                                                                       8

The newsletter provides a list of those members of the church serving with the BEF in France in March 1940.

 

Bendall, Joyce                                                                                                                     43

Joyce was born in Bristol about June 1921 to Walter and Elsie Bendall (nee Hall), who had married there in about December 1918.  Her brother Maurice followed in about June 1925.  During the Second World War she joined the Women’s Services in about Easter 1944.  She later met and married Cyril Coooper in about March 1951 and their children Claire and Malcolm followed in about June 1953 and December 1955 respectively.

 

Bendall, (“Mickey”)                                                                                                            29

I have not been able to trace her family history but according to the Hall Mark she joined the Women’s Services about September 1943

 

Bennett, William Joseph                                                                                                      18

William was born in Bristol in about October 1916, the only child of Joseph and Lydia E Bennett (nee Campbell), and was christened on the 20th of October 1916 just a few weeks after his parents had married in about July of that year.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving at sea with the Merchant Navy in September 1942 but I have not been able to trace whether he subsequently married or had any his children.

 

Berry, Eric                                                                                                                    30, 42

Eric was born in Chipping Sodbury about December 1918 to William and Ada Berry (nee Goodway), who had married in Malmesbury about March 1913.  His sister Muriel was also born in Chipping Sodbury about June 1920 and his brother Gerald was born in Malmesbury about June 1925.  Some time after this Eric’s family moved to Bishopston and was living in King’s Drive before the war.  He was the organist at the Church of the Good Shepherd and at St Thomas’ in the City.  He was also a member of the Society of Church Organists.  He was called up by the Army quite early in the war and was serving with “Paiforce” in Iran in September 1943. He was still serving in the Middle East the following September.  After the war he met and married Jean Terzey in about June 1949 and they had 3 children – Elizabeth, Timothy and Simon who were born in about March 1955, December 1957 and March 1959 respectively.

 

Berry, Frederick                                                                                                                  28

Brother of James, he was killed in a bombing raid on Bristol on the 4th of April 1941 aged 46, while serving with the Military Police – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Berry, James                                                                                                                       40

Brother of Frederick, he died of pneumonia while serving in Bristol with a RAF Barrage Balloon unit on the 29th of July 1944 aged 47 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Bevan, Alan                                                                                                                         34

Alan was born in Bristol about June 1924 the only child of Arthur and Ivy Bevan (nee Fryer), who had married there about December 1920.   According to the Hall Mark, Alan was called up by the RAF about January 1944.  He later met and married Kitty Tovey in Bristol about March 1950 and they had 3 girls – Joy, Christine and Gloria who were born about December 1950, June 1952 and June 1954 respectively.

 

Bevan, Sidney                                                                                                          25, 45, 47

Sid was born in Bristol about March 1920 to Herbert and Mabel Bevan (nee Sire), who had married there in about June 1916.  His younger brother Herbert followed in about September 1925.  His father was a pre war Territorial and served in France with the Gloucestershire Regiment in the 61st (South Midland) Division from about March 1915, finishing up in Italy at the end of the war.  During the Second World Sid was called up by the Army and the Hall Mark notes that he was serving in Germany with the BLA by February 1945.  He had earlier married his cousin Elsa Sire in about March 1941 and they had 2 boys – Terrence (March 1943) and Lesley (December 1944).  These births were duly noted in the Hall Mark in March 1943 and February 1945 respectively.

 

Bevan, Stan                                                                                                                         47

Stan was born in Bristol about December 1924 the only child of Charles and Violet Bevan (nee Kent), who had married there in about September 1923.  According to the Hall Mark his wedding was due to take place on Easter Monday 1945 but this does not seem to have come off and he later married Beryl Russell in Bristol about March 1950.  They later had 4 children – 3 boys Christopher, Philip and Alexander who were born about March 1951, December 1955 and September 1958; and one girl (Dianne) born about September 1964.

 

Bible Class                                                                       6, 9, 11, 14, 22, 37, 46, 49, 57, 61

The Bible Class was led by the Rev D B Hall and first met in 1937, attended mostly by young men in their late teens and early twenties.  Although its focus was bible study, according to Derek Warwick the main reason for its success was that it provided an opportunity for friends to gather together to smoke and chat.  Apparently one of the members provided liberal quantities of “Three Castles” cigarettes, which were a cut above the usual Woodbines.  Whatever the case may be, the Bible Class proved hugely successful and many former members looked back on those days as the best years of their lives.

 

In March 1940 the Bible class was moved to the Vicarage Drawing Room, where it met at 2.30 on Sunday afternoon with an average attendance of over 30, despite the depredations of National Service.  The Senior Bible Class had moved to the New Buildings by September 1940 and by March numbers had become further depleted by the call up.  By February 1942 numbers were back up to 50, although night schools, the ATS and Home Guard claimed many on Sundays.   Numbers were down to about 30 in January 1943 despite numbers joining up every week.  By March 1944 the Bible Class had started up a series of lively monthly debates on subjects such as “is it Christian to judge War Criminals” and “the place of religion in education”.  With the end of the war in sight by May 1945 the Rev D B Hall was calling on returning servicemen to add new blood to the Bible Class and supplement its ageing members.  By November members of the Bible Class were volunteering to be Sunday School Teachers and at Christmas 1945 the Bible Class Carol Singing Party had raised over £8 for charity.

 

Billett, Donald                                                                                                                     61

Donald was born in Bristol about March 1928 to Reginald and Ethel Billett (nee Mackey), who had married in Thornbury about September 1926.  His sister Audrey was born a few years later in about December 1931.  His father was born in Clifton and in 1911 was living in at the Oaklands in Almondsbury where his father was working as a gardener in domestic service.  Reginald later served in France aged 16 as an aircraftsman with the RFC from the 31st of October 1915 and after the war worked in the aircraft industry in Bristol.  Donald was called up by the Army some time after November 1945.  After he completed his National Service he later met and married Mary Mathews in Harlow in Essex in about March 1953, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Black, George                                                                                                                     41

Brother of Jim & William, he was born in Bristol about June 1921.  Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his parents, although his mother’s maiden name was Tate.  He also had two sisters – Margaret born in September 1921 and Maria in about July 1927.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the BLA in France in September 1944.  Prior to this he had met and married Lillian Manning in Bristol about September 1943 and their daughter Georgina was born about December 1944.   After the war their son Christopher was born in about September 1948.

 

Black, Jim                                                                                                         41, 45, 53, 56

Eldest brother of George & William, he was born in Bristol about September 1919.   According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the BLA in France in September 1944.  He had been slightly wounded by February 1945 and had been awarded an MID and promoted in the field to Sergeant Major by the following July.  By November 1945 he had been awarded the Military Medal.  He does not appear to have married after the war.

 

Black, William                                                                                                                   41

Youngest brother of Jim & George (see above), he was born in Bristol about March 1924.   According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the BLA in France in September 1944.  He later married Mary Nicholls in Bristol about September 1945 and their son MacDonald was born in Bristol about March 1948.

 

Blacklock, Frank                                                                                                                22

Frank Joseph Haytor Blacklock was born in Bishopton about March 1914 to Joseph Haytor and Constance Mary Blacklock (nee Fisher), who had married there in about September 1910.  His sister Constance (but known by her second name Mary) followed 2 years year later in about June 1916.  His father was a schoolmaster having graduated from a training college in Cheltenham in 1901.  In 1911 Frank’s parents were living at 23 Upper Belmont Road in Bishopston.  His grandparents also lived nearby and his grandfather was working as a joiner at this time.  According to a newsletter published in May 1931, Frank’s sister Mary was confirmed at St Michael & All Angels Church on the 31st of May 1931.  According to the Hall Mark, Frank was “keeping a fatherly eye” on the 61st Bristol Scout Troop with the assistance of Leonard Hill for a period of about a year from January 1943.  About this time he also met and married Mary Davies in Bridgend and their son David Haytor Blacklock was later born in Bristol about June 1945.  As for his sister Mary, she lived all her life in Bishopston and died about 1990.

 

Bland, Rev. T                                                                                  14, 16, 21, 29, 33, 42, 46

Although I have not been able to trace his family history, the Hall Mark notes that he was a member of Clifton Theological College invited by the Rev D B Hall to join his staff as a Deacon from the 31st of May 1942.   He was ordained Deacon on the 2nd of August and was later ordained priest on Trinity Sunday 1943.  He ran the Boys Club, which by January 1944 was bursting at the seams with 65 members, and eventually departed to take over a parish in Coventry in September 1944

 

Bombing                                                                                                                    9, 10, 12

The Rev D B Hall gives a very reassuring if somewhat stoical account of the impact of the impact of the bombing on Bishopston.  For a fuller account of the damage inflicted see the introduction to the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45).  As a choirboy during the war years Ray Hillman particularly remembers the occasion when the Rev Hall saved the church from certain destruction by putting out an incendiary bomb which had landed in the clergy vestry beside the organ case.

 

Bond, Beatrice            Mary (“Trixie”)                                                                                 22, 59

She was born in the Easton area of Bristol in 1897 to James and Ada Bond.  In 1901 she was living with her parents at 58 High Street, together with her older brother Sydney (born 1890) and sister Ada (born 1892).  Her father was working as a stationary engine driver at this time.  By 1911 they were living at 30 Tudor Road in Lower Easton.  Her father and brother were working as carriage builders for the Midland Railway at this time, while Trixie packed crates of cocoa for Messrs Fry & Sons.  Trixie later moved to the Bishopston area of Bristol and during the Second World War she was called up by the WLA about January 1943 and was demobilized by March 1946.  She also worked with the Brownies during the war and continued to do a lot of work with the youth of the Parish afterwards.  She lived in Church Road after the war and later moved to Weston Super Mare where she died in March 1984 aged 87.

 

Bools, Geoffrey                                                                                                           33, 51

Killed in a flying accident in India on the 1st of May 1945 aged 23 –  one of 4 brothers from this family to be killed while serving with the RAF – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Boulter, Leslie                                                                                                             45, 47

Leslie was born in Wolverhampton about September 1917 to William Joseph and Eliza Elizabeth Boulter (nee Eccleston) who had married in Luton in Bedfordshire about September 1914.  His brother William (see below) was also born there in about September 1922.  His father was born in Birmingham in about 1897 and in 1911 was living Brookfield Terrace in Bilston in Staffordshire together with his parents and brother and sister.  He was working as a stable boy at this time but later enlisted in the 1/6 South Staffordshire Regiment on the 19th of March 1914.  This was a Territorial unit that was mobilized for war in August 1914 and later moved to join the 46th (North Midland) Division in the Luton area.  It was here that he married Eliza who originally came from Willenhall in Staffordshire, where she lived with her widowed mother and two brothers and sister.  William went to France with his Regiment on the 5th of March 1915 and took part in the defensive action at Hooge (30-31 July 1915) where the Germans attacked with liquid fire and in the attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt (13th October 1915).  However illness prevented him travelling with the Regiment to Egypt in January 1916 and he was eventually medically discharge on the 22nd of March.

 

He returned to work in Wolverhampton where the boys were born but at some point the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael and All Angels Church.  His eldest son Leslie joined the RAF during the early years of the war and served at various airfields around the country before being posted overseas.  According to the Hall Mark was serving in Aden in February 1945, although the Rev Hall was surprised to learn that Leslie was married with 2 children by this time.  However, the records show that he had in fact married Enid Bizion in Cannock in Staffordshire about January 1941.  Their eldest son Christopher was born in Walsall in about September 1942, while his brother Leslie was born in Louth in Lincolnshire about June 1944.

 

Boulter, William                                                                                                      6, 38, 60

A former chorister at St Michael & All Angels Church and brother of Leslie (see above), William was born in Wolverhampton about September 1922.  He enlisted in the Army before the war and served in France as a in the RAMC in March 1940 where he saw action at Dunkirk but remained on Home Service thereafter – rising to the rank of sergeant – until demobilised in March 1946.  After the war he met and married Muriel Page in Norwich about September 1951.  They later settled in Ilford in London and their son Anthony was born there about September 1953.

 

Boys and Church Lads Clubs                                                                                           11

These organisations continued to function in the Parish Halls despite these being taken over by the Home Guard and the Services Canteen for the duration of the war.  By March 1941 games had been reserved twice a week in the Canteen for the Boys and Lads’ Clubs and the Rev Hall worked hard to ensure that the youth work continued to be supported throughout the war.

 

Bradford, Sydney                                                                                                        46, 47

She was born in Bristol about June 1926 to William and Mabel Bradford (nee Hinder) and her brother Norman was born some years later in about March 1938.  According to the Hall Mark, Sydney was a winner of the Richard’s prize in February 1945 and became engaged to Vic Spencer about the same time.  They eventually married in Bristol about March 1946 and their only daughter Carol was born in about March the following year.

 

Brace, Barbara                                                                                                                22

Barbara was born in Bristol about March 1922 to Arthur and Mabel Brace (nee Hobbs) and her sister Marion (see below) followed in about December 1925.  According to the Hall Mark, Barbara was running the Berkeley Road Guides with Betty Lloyd in January 1943.  She later married Jeffrey Mitchelmore in about September 1949 and they lived in Cromwell Road for a while before moving to Ashley Down Road.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  In later years she chaired the Clifton Trefoil Guild (a fellowship group for older Girl Guides) and died about 1990.

 

Brace, Marion                                                                                                                   22

Sister of Barbara (see above), she was born in Bristol about December 1925.  She went to Redmaids School and later helped Miss Webber (see below) run the Brownies in January 1943.  After the war she met and married Ronald Haggett in Bristol about March 1949 and they had 3 children – Lisa (June 1951), John (June 1954) and Paul (March 1956).

 

Brackstone, George William                                                                                              42 George was born in Bishopston about July 1903 to William and Emily Brackstone (nee Hickling) and in 1901 his family was living at 3 Salthrop Road in Bishopston, together with sister Fanny and brother Cyril.  Also living with them at this time was his widowed Grandmother Fanny Hickling, his mother’s brother Robert Hickling and his father’s sister Kate Brackstone.  His father was working as an accountant at this time, while his uncle was an Ironmonger and his aunt worked as a book keeper.  They were still at this address in 1911 and his grandmother was still living with them, although his aunt and uncle were no longer in residence.     They also had domestic servant – Helen Drewett aged 23 – living with them and his father was working as a merchant’s clerk in the provisioning trade at this time.

 

George seems to have lived all his life in Bishopston and quite late in life married Edith Oliver (nee Williams) there in about March 1943, shortly before he departed for service in the Middles East.  She had previously been married to Walter Oliver in about March 1925 until his death in September 1931 aged 68.  I have not been able to trace any children from either marriage.  According to the Hall Mark, George was still serving in the Middle East in September 1944.  After the war George and Edith moved to Weston super Mare where Edith died in March 1987 aged 90 and George followed a few years later in November 1990 aged 87.

 

Bray, John                                                                                                                   34, 47

John was born in Bath about June 1915.  I have not been able to trace his parents or siblings, although his mother’s maiden name was Randall.  He was called up by the Army during the early years of the war and was eventually invalided out in about January 1944.  He made a full recovery and later married Margaret Pearse in Weston super Mare about January 1945.   They continued to live in Bristol after the war and had 2 children – Judith who was born about December 1949 and Phillip in about June 1955.

 

Bray, Peter                                                                                                                         19

Peter was born in Chard in Somerset about September 1922 the only child of Walter and Ellen Bray (nee Parsons), who had married there in about September 1921.  Walter had served as a conscript in the Somerset Light Infantry during the later stages of the First World War.  The family later moved to Bristol and was living at Nevil Road in Bishopston when the Second World War started.   Peter was called up quite early in the war and was serving in the Middle East from about September 1942.  After the war he met and married Mary Meacham in Bristol about September 1947 and they had 2 daughters – Christine who was born about September 1948 and Teresa in about June 1952.

 

Bray Peter                                                                                                                   19, 34

Peter was born in Keynsham about September 1921 to Howard and May Bray (nee Sidnell), who had married in Bath about December 1919.  His sister Joan was born in Bristol a few months later in about March 1920.  His father served as a conscript with the Royal Highland Regiment during the later stages of the First World War.  His family later moved back to Bristol and was living at Dongola Road in Horfield when the Second World War broke out.  Peter volunteered for the RAF quite early on and was serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  He later served as a sergeant in a bomber squadron in January 1944, possibly based near Newton Abbott in Devon where he later met and married Hazel Thorne in about June 1946.  After the war the couple remained in Newton Abbott and had 2 boys –Robert born about March 1948 and Christopher in about March 1951.

 

 

Bray, Wilson (“Blackeyes”)                                                                            22, 34, 53, 60

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was a member of the Bible Class.  He was serving with the Navy in September 1942 and had met many “nice girls” by January 1944 and was serving in an aircraft carrier in the Far East by July 1945.   He travelled all over the Far East but was based at Colombo in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) by March 1946.

 

Bristol, HMS                                                                                                               29, 33

This was shore based training centre, re-established on the 31st August 1939 for those intended to serve in convoys aboard DEMS ships.  The trainees made frequent use of St Michael’s Canteen and in September 1943 played against the Pessimists Cricket Team at the County Ground, eventually losing by 9 wickets.  The unit eventually departed for Windsor and London in January 1944 leaving a donation of £98 for the Canteen.

 

Broomfield, Dennis                                                                                                 6, 21, 28

Joined the RAF about March 1940 and was killed in a flying accident in the Comoro Islands on the 8th of September 1942 aged 22 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Brown, John                                                                                                                      29

I have not been able to trace his wider family history but the Hall Marks notes that he joined the RAF after Easter 1943.

 

Brown, Norman                                                                                                    20, 34, 40

A pilot with the RAF, he was killed in a flying accident in Australia on the 1st of July 1944 aged 21 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Brown, Rosemary, Mrs                                                                                               34, 53

Formerly Rosemary Cowley, she married Norman Brown in September 1943 about a year before he was killed in a flying accident in Australia – see above.  She later joined the Women’s Services some time after February 1945 and was serving in India together with her brother Pat by November 1945.  I have not been able to trace her earlier family history but after the war she met and married Aubrey Honour in Wantage about June 1952 and they had 3 daughters – Jennifer, Valerie and Sheila, born about March 1954, December 1956 and September 1959 respectively.

 

Browne, Colin                                                                                                                  52

I have not been able to trace Colin’s family history but the Hall Mark notes that he had arrived in the Far East by July 1945.

 

Browne, John                                                                                                       34, 53, 60

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark records that he was called up by the Army about January 1944 and was serving in the Far East with SEAC by July 1945.  By March 1946 he was in hospital in India from where he was eventually invalided out of the Army.

 

Brownies                                                                                                                           22

Girls under the age of 11 started to be admitted as “Brownies” from about 1923 and by 1936 Miss Webber (see below) had taken over as full time “Brown Owl”.  They were still being run by Miss Webber (assisted by Marion Brace) in January 1943.

 

Bull, Eileen                                                                                                                      29 Eileen’s was born in Bristol about June 1924 to John and Edith Bull (nee Davis), who had married there about June 1923.  Her brother Francis followed in about December 1925.  During the war she married Dennis Mizen in Bristol about March 1942 and was later called up by the Women’s Services shortly after Easter 1943.  Their children Michael and Christine born about September 1945 and December 1947 respectively.

 

Bull, Gerald                                                                                                                42, 44

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark records that he was called up for the Navy some time after Easter 1944 and had been posted to Gibraltar by February 1945.

 

Bull, Joan                                                                                                                           29

I have not been able to trace Joan’s parents or her date of birth but the Hall Mark records that she was the sister of Joyce Bull and that she joined the Women’s Services some time after Easter 1943.  After the war she met and married Bernard Elliott in Bristol about December 1950 and their son Steven was born about March 1952, followed by their daughter Vivienne in March 1957.

 

Bull Joyce                                                                                                                           29

Joyce was born in Bristol about December 1924 to Albert and Annie Bull (nee O’Hara), who had married there the previous April. Some years later her sister Janet was born in about September 1939.  During the war Joyce joined the Women’s Services some time after Easter 1943.  After the war she met and married Stanley Elliott in about September 1950 and their daughter Marilyn was born about June 1953, followed by their son Andrew in about June 1956.

 

Burt, Enid                                                                                                                          26

Enid was born in Bristol about June 1922, the only child of Alfred and Ida Burt (nee Turner) who had married there in about June 1920.  Her father had served with both the Wiltshire and Gloucestershire Regiments during the latter part of the First World War. The family lived in Longmead Avenue in Bishopston from where they would have attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.   During the Second World War she was called up by the WLA in about March 1943 and married Ronald Webber a few weeks later in about June of that year.  She and Ron eventually settled in the Exmoor area where they had 5 children – Denise in about March 1944 followed by Gillian (September 1945), Roger (December 1947), Jacqueline (June 1952) and Yvonne (September 1953).

 

Byerley, Fred                                                                                                              18,30

Fred was born in Swansea about June 1915 to Alfred Robert and Annie Byerley (nee Oram) who had married in Bristol in about December 1910.  His father Alfred also came from Bristol and in 1901 was living with his parents (Joseph and Ann Byerley) and his sister Lucy at 18 Ashley Hill in the St Werburghs area of Bristol, from where he was working as a locksmith’s assistant.  By March 1911 Fred’s parents were boarding at a Lodging House at 7 Bellvue Terrace in Southsea near Portsmouth, where his father was managing a jeweller’s shop.  However his mother later returned to Bristol where his eldest brother (Joseph) was born in about September 1911 but they were back in Portsmouth the following year, where his sister Nora Gwendoline was born about September 1912.  However the family had moved back to Bristol by June 1914 where his brother John was born.  His father later served with the Royal Engineers in Gallipoli and Palestine during the First World War and by 1921 the family was living at 61 Berkeley Road in Bishopston. Sadly his father died in about June 1928 and his widow and children were living at 91 Egerton Road in 1930 and were still there when the Second World War broke out.  The family attended regularly at St Michaels & All Angels Church and the children were educated at the local Bishop Road School.

 

Fred had trained as an engineer in the Merchant Navy after leaving school and saw action on various convoy routes during the war.  He corresponded regularly with the Rev D B Hall, even providing him with a dozen eggs in response to one of his wartime newsletters.  Neither John nor Fred seems to have married but their elder brother Joseph did marry Teresa D’Agostino in Portsmouth in about March 1934.  They had two children Pauline (born about March 1936) and Joseph (born about December 1938).  They were both born in Portsmouth where the family seem to have settled before the war, although they later moved to Bath where Joseph died in 1971.  As for Gwen, she married Harold Prosser in Bristol about September 1935.  Their daughter Madeleine was later born in about March 1939 and became John’s Godchild.  They later moved to Weston super Mare where Gwen eventually died in about November 1991.

 

Byerley, John                                                                                                  17, 30, 41, 57

Brother of Fred, he was listed as missing following the Singapore campaign but was later reported as having died in a Japanese POW camp on the 26th of May 1944 aged 30 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Byrne, Rodney                                                                                                                   38

Rodney was born in Islington about December 1918 to Robert and Ethel Byrne (nee Selby), who had married there in about December 1917.  His brother Dennis followed a few years later in about June 1921.  Some time after this the family moved to Bishopston where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  It seems likely that Rodney joined the RAMC during the war and the Hall Mark records that he was working in a Hospital in Malta in March 1944.  After the war he met and married Joyce Campbell in Basford in Nottinghamshire about September 1946 and they later settled in Coventry where they had 3 children – Joyce born about December 1949, followed by Ian in September 1953 and Ruth in December 1956.

C

Cadets                                                                                                       17, 25, 37, 38, 46

In addition to his many other duties, the Rev D B Hall was running a Junior Army Cadet Company of 45 boys by September 1942.  By March 1943 this had increased to 70 boys and 15 of them managed to pass Part 1 of their War Certificate A.  In March 1944 they had come 56th out 500 Companies competing in a shooting competition organized by the News of the World.  However by the spring of 1944 pressure of work forced him to resign command of the Company to “Ted” Wookey (see below), who remained in charge until the end of the war.

 

Cainey, Cyril                                                                                                        38, 58, 60

Cyril was born in Bristol about March 1920 to William and May Cainey (nee Tooze), who had married there in about March 1914.  His older sister Joan had also been born in Bristol some 4 years earlier in about December 1915.  His father served with the mechanical transport section of the Army Service Corps during the First World War.  During the Second World War, Cyril was serving as a sergeant major in the REME in March 1944 and in about March 1945 he met and married Ruby Higley in Bristol.  This marriage was noted in the Hall Mark in November 1945, which also noted that Cyril was serving in with the BAOR in Germany in March 1946.  I have not been able to trace if there were any children from this marriage.

 

Campbell, Eric                                                                                                            15, 28

Eric was killed in a flying accident on the 10th of January 1942 aged 23 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Camps                                                                                8, 17, 25, 29, 42, 52, 54, 57, 61

These were a major feature of life within the Parish both before and during the war.  The Diocese organised separate camps for boys and girls at Brean Down and Winscombe – these lasted about a week and cost 15 shillings to attend.  Fond memories are also recalled of the camps organized by Canon Vinning on the Isle of Wight at a slightly higher cost of £2 and 2 shillings.  These dated back to 1919 and before that Canon Vining had first started the idea at Alnmouth in Northumberland in 1911.  Both the Rev Hall and his brother were very active in organizing these camps.  Messrs Denley, Wookey and Weeks were instrumental in organizing the camp concert at which comedy sketches and sing songs were the main feature. The planning and attendance at camps organized for the Scouts, Boys Brigade, Cadets and the CLB also feature strongly in the newsletters.

 

Cann, Ronald                                                                                                                    38

Ron was born in Bristol about March 1920 the only child of Edward and Florence Cann (nee Gibbens), who had married there in about December 1915.  His father was a Territorial Soldier and during the First World War served with the 1/4th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment in France and Italy from March 1915.  After the war the family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Ron became a keen member of the Bible Class.  When the Second World War was declared he joined the Royal Engineers and spent two years in London with a bomb disposal unit, following his return from Dunkirk.  By March 1944 he was serving in the Middle East.  After the war he met and married Julia Toomer in Bristol about September 1957 and they later moved to Yarmouth in Norfolk where they had 2 boys – Jeremy and William born about December 1961 and June 1963 respectively.

 

Cannock, Lionel                                                                                                          52, 57

Killed in action with the RAF in a bombing raid over Germany on the 27th of February 1945 aged 22 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Canteen                                                                  9, 11, 12, 25, 33, 35, 43, 46, 51, 58, 61

The Church Canteen was started in September 1940 and managed by Charles Grey – the aim was to run a Service Men’s Club in the Parish Halls and a canteen for the Home Guard but it soon became popular with servicemen and women from all over Bristol.  It was open every night and was making over a 1,000 sales a night and by the 31st of March 1943 had sold 750,000 hot drinks and 500,000 hot meals.  It provided a games room where darts, table tennis or snooker could be played and there was a quiet room for those who simply wanted to write letters to relatives back home.  It provided a place for young people to meet and socialise at the Saturday night dances organized by Leonard Watts (see below).  In addition to the Home Guard it also provided a service to trainees from HMS Bristol, the ATS and REME before if finally closed its doors on the 2nd of December 1945.

 

Car                                                                                                                              57, 60

The theft, recovery and general condition of the Rev D B Hall’s old wreck of a car attracted much interest and comment in the newsletters.

 

Carol Singing                                                                 14, 16, 21, 33, 45, 46, 58, 60, 61

Each year the Bristol Evening Post arranged for a bus to take local choirs carol singing around Bishopston and other Parishes in Bristol.  This was a popular activity amongst members of the Bible Class and Church Choir and features strongly in the newsletter, as did the more informal fundraising done by what Paul Davis (see below) called the lad’s “blackmail” carol singing party.

 

Carpenter, Jeffrey                                           15, 17, 22, 25, 33, 42, 45, 52, 56, 60, 61

Brother of Norman and Stella (see below), Jeff was born in Bristol about March 1924 to Albert and Margery Carpenter (nee Potter), who had married there about March 1918.  His father served with the Royal Engineers during the latter part of the First World War.  By February 1942 Jeff was a Rover Scouts with the 61st Bristol Scout Group (sponsored by St Michael & All Angels Church) and he and Ken Hull had just been awarded their Golden Chords and Bushman’s Thongs. For a while he took over leadership of the troop when the previous scoutmaster was called up and by September 1942 he had been called up by the Royal Navy himself.  He had been posted overseas by January 1943 and was awarded the Richard’s Prize the following March.  By September 1944 he had transferred to the FAA and was promoted to Sub Lieutenant by about February 1945.  He was serving in Australia and had visited Sydney and Brisbane by November 1945 and by March 1946 was back at home on leave.  He had just become engaged about this time, although I have not been able to trace the details of his wife or any subsequent children.

 

Carpenter, Albert Norman                                                                  6, 38, 41, 45, 53, 59

Known by his second name, he was the elder brother of Stella and Jeff, and was born in Bristol about December 1919.  He was a former scout and was serving with the BEF in France in March 1940.  After being evacuated from Dunkirk he was still on Home Service by March 1944 but was serving in France by September 1944.  He was serving with the BLA in Germany by February 1945 and had been demobilized by July 1945. On his return to England he was billeted with the Walton family at Ampthill in Bedfordshire on his return to England.  It was here that he met Mavis Walton and after a whirlwind romance they were married by the following September.  They later moved back to Bristol where their daughter Linda was born about June 1950.  Shortly after this they moved to Kingswood where their son Nigel was born about March 1954.

 

Carpenter, Stella                                                                                                              61

Sister of Jeff and Norman (see above), she was born in Bristol about June 1928.  After the war she became a ward sister at the Bristol Children’s Hospital and was awarded the Richard’s Prize in March 1946.  She later married Aelwyn Rees in Southampton about June 1962 and they later moved to the Redbridge area of London where their eldest son Graham was born about December 1965 and again to Brentwood where their youngest son Spencer Gavin was born about December 1967.

 

Castle, Vincent                                                                                                                  25

I have not been able to trace his family history but he was friend of the Rev Hall, and according to the Hall Mark, was a Padre in the 8th Army in March 1943 and had met up with Peter Storkey (see below) at Benghazi in Libya shortly before.

 

Cavanagh, Eileen                                                                                                              22

She was born in Bristol about December 1920 to Patrick and Florence Cavanagh (nee Llewelyn), who had married there the previous April.  Her sister Jean was born 2 years later in about December 1923.  According to the Hall Mark, Eileen had joined the ATS by January 1943.  After the war she met and married Vivian Brice in Ealing in London about June 1948 and their son Barry was born about September the following year.

 

Chamberlain, Wallace                                                                                       6, 17, 18, 38

The son of William Chamberlain (see below), he was born in Bristol about March 1920 and was followed by Eileen in about December 1922, and John in December 1928.  By 1938 the family was living in Horfield.  They attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and Wallace was a keen member of the 61st Bristol Scout Group.  Following in his father’s footsteps, he joined the Royal Navy before the war.  During the war he was serving as a writer on the aircraft carrier HMS Eagle and was with the ship when it was sunk on convoy duty on the 11th of August 1942.  This was part of the famous effort to relieve the siege of Malta (Operation ‘Pedestal’), during which the convoy was under almost continuous attack from submarines and aircraft and only 4 ships actually made it to port.  Fortunately this was just enough to save the colony and was a turning point in the war.  As for Wallace he was duly rescued and by March 1944 was back on a shore based station, after being torpedoed for a second time.

 

After the war he met and married Margaret Stephen in Surrey about December 1950 and their son Peter was born in Yorkshire in December 1952.  His sister Eileen married Wallace’s best friend and fellow scout Fred Packer (see below) in about August 1942.  Fred was serving in the Royal Navy at this time and was unfortunately killed a few months later in November 1942 when his troopship was sunk by a German bomber while supporting the landings in Algiers as part of Operation Torch – see below for further details.  After the war Eileen remarried to Edwin Golding in Weston super Mare but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Chamberlain, William                                                                                                        28

Father of Wallace, he was killed in action aboard the aircraft carrier HMS Courageous on the 17th of September 1939 aged 51 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Chaney, Captain                                                                                                                37

He was a member and Hon. Treasurer of the Annual Vestry and Parochial General Council.

 

Chick, Harry                                                                                                                 22, 34

Harry was born in Bristol about September 1920.  I have not been able to trace his parents or other siblings, although his mother’s surname was Haydock.  He later met and married Joyce Hewitt in about September 1942 and lived in Monmouth Road in Bishopston.  During the war he was called up by the Army and posted to Gibraltar in about January 1943, where he served on the Committee of the Bristol & District Society chaired by the Rev E M Hall (brother of the Rev D B Hall – see below).  After the war he and Joyce moved to Bathavon where their daughter Lesley was born about March 1950.

 

Chidgey, Maurice                                                                                                    22, 25, 46

Brother of Norman, he was killed in an airplane crash in Italy on the 14th of October 1944 aged 25 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Chidgey, Norman                                                                                                          22, 56

Norman was born in Bristol about September 1921 to John George and Elsie Dorothy Chidgey (nee Withey) who had married there in about December 1916.  His older brother Maurice was born in about December 1918 and there was a third brother Brian whose birth details I have not been able to trace.  His father came from Bedminster and before the First World War had worked with Maurice’s grandfather in the marble trade.  In 1939 his family was living at 120 North Road in St Andrews.  Norman was well known at St Michael & All Angels Church and a loyal member of the Bible Class.  During the war he was posted overseas in January 1943 and was still serving there in November 1945. After the war he married Elizabeth Jones in a church near Gloucester in about March 1947 and they had 2 daughters – Pauline (born about March 1953) and Jane (September 1955).  Norman spent the rest of his life living and working in Bristol, where he ran an electrical goods shop in Ashley Down Road until he died in July 2000.

 

Choir                                                                                                             6, 12, 29, 41, 42

The Choir was very popular in the Rev Hall’s day and many of its members, or former members, were called up during the war and fondly looked back to the good times they had in the old days.  There were about 20 choristers led by the organist “Paddy” Westcott (see below) who were paid 3/6d (17.5p) each quarter for their services.  They were also paid 2 shillings (10p) for attendance at weddings.  Paddy Westcott always told them that this money was to be regarded as a reward for the services rendered rather than a payment.  In most cases this reward was quickly spent at the local fish and chip shop on Pigsty Hill.  Junior choir members were also rewarded by an annual trip to the seaside at Weymouth, and a Christmas Pantomime at the Princes Theatre on Park Row – sadly destroyed by bombing during the “Bristol Blitz”.  The lads also got up to quite a few pranks, many of which are recorded in the newsletters, while all probationary choristers faced a ritual initiation of being tossed into the holly bush near the west door of the church.

 

The Rev Hall was a keen supporter of the Choir and used to invite the choristers to the attic in the Vicarage after Evensong when sweets were passed round, while he showed cine films of camps, etc on his projector.  One evening the vicarage was burgled whilst one such film show was going on and the young choristers were taken on a tour of where the intruder had moved around the building, which they found most impressive.

Ray Hillman was a choirboy under Paddy Westcott in 1937 and was Head Chorister around 1944.  He well remembers the evenings in the Vicarage with ‘Spider’ Hall showing camp films or reading stories (Bulldog Drummond was particularly popular) in a darkened room to provide the atmosphere.

 

Ray played the piano in the Sunday School while it was at Bishop Road School until Dennis Hall invited him to do the same for the Bible Class at the end of the war, when it was back in the Lesser Hall. He was present at the Rev Hall’s consecration as Bishop in Westminster Abbey and kept in touch with him in his retirement home in Bristol until his death in the 1970s.  Ray remained in the choir as a tenor and subsequently became assistant organist to Leonard Fluck (see below). Finally after a number of years as organist at St Bartholomew’s, he retuned to that role at St Michael and All Angels until he moved to Thornbury in 1989.

 

Church Roll, Numbers Enlisted                                                          5, 6, 11, 12, 28, 34, 45

In March 1940 this listed some 150 members of the Parish who were serving with the armed forces.  The Roll continued to lengthen as the years passed rising to 280 in March 1941, 480 by September 1943, 530 by January 1944, nearly 600 by February 1945 and by March 1946 the final total stood at 630.

 

Church Services                                                            10, 21, 24, 25, 29, 33, 37, 46, 49, 57

These were well attended throughout the war and are frequently mentioned in the church newsletters, giving a strong impression to the lads overseas that life at home was continuing as normal, as the various festivals of the church were celebrated throughout the year.

 

Clark, Wally                                                                                                                25, 41

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark records that he was serving with the armed forces in Algiers by March 1943 (where he met up with Maurice Chidgey, Laurie Gillard, Maurice Neweport and Derick Warwick) and in Italy by September 1944.

 

Clements, Eileen                                                                                                                26

Eileen was born in Bristol about March 1923, the only child of Charles and Lily Clements (nee Prowse) who had married there in Bridgewater about March 1920.  Her father was a Territorial Soldier who served in France with the 1/4th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment during the First World War.  He went to France on the 31st of March 1915 and saw action at the Somme and Third Ypres before finishing the war in Italy after the battle of Vittoria Venetto.  During the Second World War Eileen enlisted in the WAAF in about March 1943 but I have not been able to trace where she served.  After the war she met and married Victor Whale in Bristol about September 1948 and they had 2 daughters – Christine and Patricia born about June 1949 and September 1957.

 

Clephane, Donald                                                                                                       17, 28

He was killed in action with the RAF in a bombing raid over Germany on the 9th of May 1942 aged 23 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Cock, Wallace                                                                                                             34, 60

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark records that he had joined the Army and been promoted to Captain by September 1943 and was serving with the BAOR in Germany by March 1946.

 

Cock, Walter                                                                                                                      30

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark records that he was serving in the Middle East by September 1943.

 

Cockle, Alva                                                                                                                       60

Alva was born in Bristol about September 1916 to Clifford and Elizabeth Cockle, who had married in Axbridge about June 1915.  His brothers Charles and Robert followed in about December 1920 and March 1924 respectively.  A former organist at the Church of the Good Shepherd, he lived in Kellaway Avenue in Bishopston before the war.  During the war he met and married Joan Lewis in Bristol about September 1942, after which they moved to their new home on Kings Drive near the Church of the Good Shepherd.  Towards the end of 1943 Alva was posted to India and in March 1946 was serving in Central Burma with a West African unit.  Their son Nigel was born about April 1944.

 

Cole, Colin                                                                                                                        30

Colin was born in Bristol about September 1918 the second son of John and Julia Cole (nee Davidson), who had married there in about March 1913.  His brother Kenneth was born first in about September 1913 and his younger brother Basil followed in about September 1920.  Colin married Kathleen Pople in Bristol about September 1942 and the following year he was posted overseas to serve with 10th Army (Paiforce) in Iraq/Persia.  After the war he returned to Bristol where his 3 sons – Alec, Andrew and Peter – were born about March 1947, December 1949 and June 1954 respectively.  The family then moved to Sodbury in Gloucestershire where his daughter Gillian was born about December 1955.

 

Coleman, Eric William Demble                                                                                  19, 57

Brother of Graham (see below), Eric was born in Bristol about March 1911 to Edwin and Jane Ewart Colemman (nee Curry) who had married there in about 1895.  In 1911 they were living at 30 Seymour Avenue in Horfield, together with his brother Francis and his sisters Mabel, Marjorie, Olive and Edna.  His father was working as a tailor’s cutter at this time, while Mable was an apprentice dressmaker.  During the Second World War both he and his brother were serving in the Middle East in September 1942 and Eric had been demobilised by November 1945.  After the war Eric met and married Elsie Hurwood (nee Guscott) in about December 1949 after she had divorced her former husband (Stanley Cecil Hurwood).  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Coleman, Graham                                                                                                             19

Brother of Eric (see above), he was also born in Bristol about September 1916.  During the Second World War both he and his brother served in the Middle East from about September 1942.  After the war Graham met and married Phyllis Price (nee Green) in Thornbury about December 1954, after she had divorced her former husband Bertram Price.  She had 2 boys from this former marriage – Roger and Robin both born in Bristol about September 1938 and March 1947 respectively – but I have not been able to trace any children from this second marriage.

 

Coleman, Michael                                                                                                              61

Michael was born in Bristol about March 1927.  I have not been able to trace his parents but the fact that his mother had the same surname suggests that his birth was illegitimate.  He was called up by the Royal Navy some time after November 1945.  Some years later he met and married Maureen Baker in Bristol about March 1959 and they had 3 children – twins David and Jennifer born about March 1960 and Steven born about June 1961.

 

Coombs, Peter                                                                                                                        43, 45

Peter was born in Bristol about March 1926, the eldest son of Fred and Doris Coombs (nee Lewis) who had married there in about July 1925.  Their other children included Roy who was born about June 1927, Brian (December 1929), the twins Denis and Joyce (December 1932) and Patricia (December 1934).  His father served in France with the mechanized section of the Army Service Corps during the latter part of the First World War.  During the Second World War, Peter was called up by the Army some time after Easter 1944 and was serving in Germany with the BLA by February 1945.  He later met Ericka Grigat while serving in Germany and they married in Bristol about September 1948.  They went on to have 3 children – Michael, Diane and Colin who were born about March 1950, June 1951 and September 1953 respectively.

 

Cooper, “Jerry”                                                                                                         18, 42

I have not been able to trace his family background but he is probably John Cooper’s brother Arthur (see below) who was given the nickname “Jerry” by the Rev Hall at one of the summer camps at Brean Down.   According to the Hall Mark he was serving at sea with the Royal Navy in September 1942 and was at home on leave by September 1944.  About this time he met refugee Edne Donner and they married in Bristol about December 1944.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Cooper, John                                                                                                        38, 46, 53

John was born in Bristol about December 1916, the eldest son of Arthur and Ellen Cooper (nee Oliffe), who had married there in about March 1914.  After Arthur returned from his war service overseas they had 6 other children – Ellen born about September 1920 followed by Arthur (September 1922) Margaret (September 1924), the twins Edward and Ivy (September 1927) and Violet (March 1931).  A member of the Bible Class before the war, he later met and married Ethel Humphries in Bristol about January 1943 and their daughter Maureen was born in Sodbury in Gloucestershire the following June.  John had been called up by the Army about this time and the Hall Mark records that he was training as a glider pilot in an Airborne Regiment in March 1944.   He later took part in the battle for Arnhem (Operation Market Garden) in September, where he was taken prisoner.  He later returned home with the other POWs in about July 1945.

 

Cooper, Margaret                                                                                                             23

Sister of John Cooper – see above – she was born in Bristol about September 1924.  She later met and married Fred Seymour in Bristol about July 1939 and their daughter Beryl was born in Birmingham the following September.  She joined the WLA in about January 1943 and their son Keith was later born in Gloucester about September 1944.

 

Cooper, Ray                                                                                                                52, 57

Ray was born in Bristol about September 1921, the only child of Harry and Olive Cooper (nee Woodhouse) who had married in Royston in Hertfordshire in about June 1919.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and Ray was one of the officers chosen to help run the Summer Camp at Brean Down planned for September 1945.  He later became a Sunday School Teacher the following November.  Both he and his mother helped to run the Sunday School for many years and her monologues were remembered by many former pupils.  After the war Ray met and married Joan Wicks in Bristol about March 1950.  She was also a member of St Michael & All Angels Church and lived nearby in Nottingham Road and had spent the war years with the WLA.  After they married she moved in with him at their new home on Kings Drive from where they both became actively involved in the Pigsty Hill Drama Group (the Orchard Players) appearing in many pantomimes and plays in the Church Hall.  Sadly Ray died about July 2003 but his wife Jean is still living in Henbury.

 

Cordwell, L                                                                                                                       34

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark records that he was serving in India in January 1944.

 

Corney, Mervyn                                                                                                               60

Although I have not been able to uncover Mervyn’s early family history, the records show that he was born in Bristol about March 1917 and that his mother’s maiden name was Pomroy.   According to the Hall Mark he served with the armed forces throughout most of the war and by March 1946 had been added to the list of those who had been demobilized since V E Day.  He married Florence Howell in Bristol about April 1940 and their daughter Jean was born there the following September.

 

Corney, John                                                                                                                   18

Although I have not been able to trace John’s early family history, the records show that he was born in Bristol about December 1924.  The records also show that his mother had the same maiden name, which suggests that his birth was illegitimate.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the Merchant Navy in September 1942, which he probably joined after leaving school before the war.  After the war he met and married Joyce Withers in Bristol about December 1947 and they later had 3 children – the twins Elizabeth and Stephen in about September 1953 and Richard about December 1956.

 

Cosburn, Hubert Miles                                                                                                8, 35

Miles was born in Bristol about December 1920 to Walter and Kate Cosburn (nee Miles), who had married in Cheltenham about September 1912, where his father had been staying in a boarding house while he learned his trade a trainee hosier.   His parents moved to Bristol shortly thereafter, where his older brother Walter was born in about December 1915.  Miles served with the BEF in France during the Second World War where he was slightly wounded.  He was safely evacuated from Dunkirk and was on Home Service by September 1940.  The banns for his marriage to Freda Hooper were called in church in January 1944 and they married in Bodmin later that month.  Their daughter Ingrid was born in Bodmin about June 1945 after which they moved to Sodbury in Gloucestershire where their second daughter Marilyn was born about March 1947.  However, they soon moved back to Bodmin where their third daughter Gillian was born about September 1948, followed by their son Miles in about June 1951.

 

Cottrell, Dennis                                                                                                               25

Dennis was born in Bristol about December 1924 to Charlie and Ada Cottrell (nee Tucker), who had married there in about December 1918.  He had an older sister Joan who was also born in Bristol about June 1920 and an older brother Douglas, born about September 1921.  According to the Hall Mark, Dennis was serving in the Middle East by March 1943. After the war he met and married Norma E Huygens in Bristol about June 1947, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Cottrell, Jack                                                                                                                   41

Jack was born in Bristol about December 1922 to John and Fanny Cottrell (nee Francis), who had married there in about June 1918.  He had 7 other brothers and sisters – William (born March 1919) Frederick (March 1920); Lillian (June 1922), Annie (March 1925), Edward (December 1926) and the twins Edwin and Graham born about December 1932.  Jack was called up by the Army during the Second World War and according to the Hall Mark was serving in France by September 1944.  I have not been able to trace whether he married, or had any children after the war ended.

 

 

Coupland, Henry                                                                                                             45

John William Henry Coupland was born in Bristol about September 1926 to William and Doris Coupland (nee Barnes), who had married there about March 1925.   His sister Irene was born about September 1927 and his brother David followed in about September 1928.  His father had served as gunner in the Royal Artillery during the later stages of the First World War.  It is not clear which service Henry joined during the Second World War but the Hall Mark notes that he had earned a MID by February 1945.  After the war he met and married Annie Thomas in Bristol about September 1947 and their daughter Patricia was born about March 1950.

 

Cowley, Pat                                                                                                     22, 41, 45, 56

Although I have not been able to trace his early family history, the Hall Mark records that he had a sister Rosemary (see below) and that he was called up by the Army about January 1943.  He had obtained a commission by September 1944 and was serving with the BLA in Germany by February 1945.   By November 1945 had been posted to India, together with his sister.   After the war he met and married Betty Somers in Bristol about June 1950 and they had 2 daughters – Patricia born about December 1952 and Julia about March 1955.

 

Cowley, Rosemary                                                                                                             34

Sister of Pat and wife of Norman Brown – see under Rosemary Brown for further details.

 

Cox, Eric                                                                                                                29, 42, 53

Eric was born in Bristol about June 1926 to William and Gertrude Cox (nee Thayer), who had married there about June 1916.  His older sister Edna had been born some years before in about June 1918.  Both his father and his uncle Joseph served with the 7th Somerset Light Infantry during the First World War and Joseph was killed in action at Polygon Wood on the 28th of September 1917 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1914-18) for further details.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church where Eric later served as a choir boy.   The Hall Mark notes that Eric was called up by the Navy shortly after Easter 1943 and was later serving on a fire fighting launch near Weymouth by September 1944.  He was still there in July 1945 and in his spare time was working in the local theatre, playing the part of a detective in a murder mystery.  After the war he met and married Stella Willey in Bristol about June 1953 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Cox, Jack                                                                                                                           30

Jack was born in Bristol about June 1924, the only son of Nicholas and Mary Cox (nee Rides), who had married there about June 1921.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving with 10th Army (Paiforce) in Iraq/Persia in September 1943.  He was back in Bristol by about September 1944 where he married Marjorie Macfarlane, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Craddy, Claude Edward                                                                     18, 30, 41, 45, 52, 58

Brother of Eric (see below), he was born about August 1917 to James Edward and Frances Mary Craddy (nee Haysom), who had married there in about September 1911.  His parents were living at 87 Downend Road in Horfield at this time.  Prior to this his father had been lodging at 24 Elton Road in Bishopston and later served with the Yorkshire Regiment during the later years of the First World War.  Claude was baptized at St Michael & All Angels Church on the 18th of August 1917 and also attended Sunday School there.  He served with the Army in West Africa from about September 1942 and was broadcasting piano solos for ENSA from Bombay by September 1943.  He had been appointed Musical Director for ENSA by February 1945 and by November he was still in India having been promoted to the rank of Major.   After the war he met and married Margaret Taylor in Leicester about March 1950, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  He also owned a musical instrument business on the Gloucester Road and, with his brother Eric, performed as a semi professional musician at local venues such as the Berkeley Café on Queen’s Road.

 

Craddy, Eric                                                                                                          19, 34, 57

Elder brother of Claude (see above), he was also born in Bristol in about March 1913. Like his brother he attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and went to their Sunday School.  He later met and married Vera Panes in Weston super Mare about June 1938 and their son Richard was born about June 1947.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving in the Middle East with the Eighth Army by September 1942, having been wounded in the fighting in Libya.  By January 1944 he had been promoted to Captain and was eventually demobilised by November 1945.  After the war he worked with his brother in their musical instrument business on the Gloucester Road, while also performing as a semi professional musician at local venues such as the Berkeley Café on Queen’s Road.  He also ran a radio and electrical business on the Gloucester Road.

 

Craggs, William                                                                                                                 19

I have not been able to trace his early family history but the records show that William married Sheila Gulley in Bristol about June 1941, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  According to the Hall Mark, William was serving in the Middle East in September 1942.

 

Crane, Ken                                                                                                        22, 34, 42, 60

Ken was born in Thornbury about September 1924 the only child of Albert and Hilda Crane (nee Lessey), who had married in Bristol about September 1923.  At some point after this the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  During the Second World War, Ken was called up by the Royal Navy about January 1943 and had been in hospital in Malta by January 1944.  By September 1944 he had transferred to the Army and was serving in Bangalore in India by March 1946.   After the war he met and married Mary Legg in Bristol about March 1947 and their daughter Linda was born there about September the following year.  The family later moved to Sodbury in Gloucestershire where their son Graham was born about September 1952.

 

Cricket & other Sports                                                                                               29, 52

Many sporting activities were curtailed during the war but the Pessimists Cricket Club continued and managed to beat a team from HMS Bristol by 9 wickets in the summer of 1943.  By the end of the war it was considered to be one of the best teams in the City, although by then the Schoolboys Rugby Club had started up again as life returned to normal.

 

Croker, Harold                                                                                                           45, 62

Harold was born in Bristol about December 1916 to Bertie and Elizabeth Croker (nee Broomfield), who had married there in about March 1914. His brother Ken (see below) followed in about March 1918.  His father was a Regular soldier who served with the 1st Battalion the Grenadier Guards before the First World War.  He went to Antwerp with the 7th Division on the 6th of October 1914, which later suffered very heavy casualties at 1st Ypres where it earned the nickname the “Immortal Seventh”.   On the 4th of March 1915 his unit transferred to the 3rd Brigade of the Guards Division which saw action in all the major battles on the western Front including Loos, the Somme, 3rd Ypres the German Spring Offensive on the Somme and the advance to the Sambre.  He was discharged at the end of the war and the family settled in Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  During the Second World War, Harold was called up by the Army and according to the Hall Mark was serving with the BLA in Germany by February 1945.  He had married Doreen Osborne in Bristol about March 1942 and was back at home with his family by March 1946.  Their daughter Elizabeth was born June 1943 and after the war their 3 boys – Richard, David and Andrew – were born in about June 1948, June 1953 and June 1957 respectively.

 

Croker, Ken                                                                                                          34, 41, 45

Brother of Harold (see above), he was born in Bristol about March 1918.  He was called up by the Army during the Second World War and according to the Hall Mark he was serving with the Army in North Africa by January 1944.  He had been posted to Italy by September, where he met the Rev E M Hall via the YMCA.  By February 1945 he was in Greece helping to put down the communist insurgency there.  After the war he met and married Mollie Jones in Bristol about March 1959 and their daughters Christine and Pauline were born there about June 1960 and September 1964 respectively.

 

Crouch, Ron                                                                         8, 15, 17, 19, 28, 34, 37, 45, 52

He served with the Royal Artillery from 1939 through all the major engagements of the war, being promoted and decorated many times but sadly was accidentally killed by a Dutch sentry on the 26th of June 1945 aged 28, just after the war had ended – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Cubs                                                                                                                                  14

In February 1942 these were being run (or “harangued” as the Rev Hall puts it) by Miss Handford (see below), who had been running the pack since 1917.  She lived at 13 Nottingham Road in Bishopston and the cubs met at 7 pm on Tuesdays and at 3.30 pm on Saturdays.

 

Cusdin, Henry                                                                                                             34, 56

Although I have not been able to trace his early family history, the records show that Henry was born in Bristol about December 1924 and that his mother’s maiden name was Bishop.  They also show that he had an older sister Muriel who had been born in Bristol about December 1917.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Royal Navy about January 1944 and was serving in India by November 1945.  After the war he met and married Mary Withers in Bristol about June 1947 and they had 3 children – Anne, Geraldine and Paul – who were born about June 1950, December 1952 and December 1957 respectively.  Their eldest daughter now lives in Wales.

 

D

Dando, Kenneth                                                                                  6, 18, 25, 34, 35, 46

Ken was born in Bristol about March 1921, the only child of Walter and Mabel Dando (nee Hayes), who had married there about March 1920.  His father had served with the Royal Engineers during the latter part of the First World War and in 1924 the family was living at 70 Richmond Road in Montpelier.  They later attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Ken became a chorister.  He probably joined the Army shortly before the Second World War and was serving in France by March 1940.   By September 1942 he had been posted to India and by March 1943 was serving in Poona, where he had been promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.  He was still in India in January 1944, although he had become engaged to a Wren by then and had married her by February 1945.   I have not been able to ascertain the name of his wife or whether they had any children.

 

Davey, Denis                                                                                                                     61

Denis was born in Bristol about June 1920 to Ernest and Maud Davey (nee Williams), who had married there in about September 1916.  He had two younger brothers – Royston and Brian – who were born about June 1927 and March 1935 respectively.  He later met and married Gwendoline Jones in Bristol about June 1941 and their daughter Sandra was born in about September the following year.  Although Denis seems to have avoided the call up during the war years, the Hall Mark notes that he was called up by the Royal Navy about March 1946.  Their son Barry was born shortly afterwards in about June 1946, followed by Irene (September 1948), Jennifer (December 1950) and the twins Linda and Gillian (March 1953).

 

David, Samuel                                                                                                                  46

Killed in a flying accident in Kenya on the 29th of November 1944 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Davies, John                                                                                            18, 19, 42, 53, 62

John was born in Bristol about June 1918.  I have not been able to trace his early family history but since the records show that his mother’s maiden name was the same as his, this suggests that he was born illegitimately.  According to the Hall Mark, he was called up by the Royal Navy during the Second World War and was serving at sea as a radar operator in the Middle East by September 1942.  He was back on home leave at Dyrham Close in Henleaze in September 1944 but had returned to duty and was serving on an escort carrier (probably against the Japanese) by July 1945.  In March 1946 he had returned home and later married Mary Cross the following May.  Their son Peter was later born in Bristol about September 1949.

 

Davis, Brian                                                                                                                         6

Although I have not been able to trace his early family history, the records show that Brian was born in Bristol about December 1920 and that his mother’s maiden name was Hancock.  According to the Hall Mark he was a former chorister and was serving with the Army in March 1940.  After the war he married Hilary Fish in Bristol about June 1952 and they had 2 children – Rachel and Antony born about September 1957 and March 1959.

 

Davis, David                                                                                                                      53

David was born in Bristol about June 1928 to William and Maud Davis (nee Jones), who had married there about December 1926.  It is likely that he may have had several brothers and sisters but I have not been able to clearly identify these from the birth records.  He was called up by the RAF some time after February 1945 and after the war he met and married Dorothy Boult in Bristol about September 1948.  They later had 3 children – Jean, Susan and John William – who were born about September 1951, March 1955 and December 1967 respectively.

 

Davis, Lionel                                                                                                                  6, 38

Lionel was born in Bristol about September 1916 to Leonard and Ralphine Davis (nee Chapman), who had married in Keynsham about June 1915.  His father had lived in Coombe Dingle before the First World War, where he worked as a furniture salesman.  Lionel also had 4 sisters – Irene, Iris, Lilian and Doreen who were born about March 1920, March 1922, September 1924 and June 1933 respectively.  The family settled in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Lionel was a former chorister. According to the Hall Mark he enlisted in the Army during the early months of the Second World War and was serving in the Royal Artillery by May 1940.  He was still on Home Service by March 1944, having gained the rank of sergeant.  He had married Ivy Knott in Bristol in about March 1937 and their son Alan was born about June 1940.

 

Davis, Harold                                                                                                     6, 38, 41, 57

Harold was born in Bristol about December 1921 to William and Elizabeth Davis (nee O’Rourke), who had married there about September 1919.  His older brother Roy was born about June 1920, followed by Denis, Betty, Arthur and Colin about December 1923, December 1925, March 1928 and December 1931 respectively.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Harold was a chorister.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving in the Royal Artillery in March 1940 and was still on Home Service (with the rank of sergeant) by March 1944.  However, he was serving with the BLA in France by September 1944 and was eventually demobilised by November 1945.  He had met and married Violet Rich in Bristol about June 1942 and they later had 7 children – Stephen, the eldest, was born about March 1949, followed by Richard, Geoffrey, James, Andrew, Simon and Judith about September 1950, June 1952, June 1955, March 1959, September 1959 and March 1963 respectively.

 

Davis, John                                                                                                                 17, 28

Fought in Sumatra and Java and after being captured by the Japanese he died in a POW camp in Japan on the 8th of December 1942 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45).

Davis, Paul                                                                      14, 19, 25, 34, 38, 41, 46, 52, 57

Killed in action with the 14th Army in Burma on the 10th of February 1945 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Day, Bernard                                                                                                          43, 60, 61

Bernard was born on the 2nd of April 1926 to Ralph and Lillian Day (nee Tovey) who had married in Bristol about June 1921.  Both his father and uncle served with the Gloucestershire Regiment during the First World War – see Appendix below for details. During the inter war period both his parents worked for the Bristol Tram Service, which operated from Tramways House on Church Road (just off Gloucester Road) and is now a Doctor’s Surgery.  The family lived at 49 Melbourne Road in Bishopston throughout this period and attended at St Michaels & All Angels Church, where Lily helped Daisy Westcott run the Infant Sunday School for nearly 30 years.

 

Bernard himself was called up by the Army shortly after Easter 1944 and served in India with the Royal Artillery for the rest of the war.  Later he met up with Glyn Lewis at a Royal Artillery Dispersal Camp in India in March 1946.  He was also awarded the Richard’s Prize about the same time.  On his return to Bristol he worked as driver for BAC/Rolls Royce and later met and married Glenys Phillips in 1950 and their son David was born the following year.  They both retired and lived in Wales for many years before Bernard died in October 2011.  He also had a younger brother Geoffrey (born 1937) and a sister Beryl (born 1928).  Geoff met and married Janet Holmes in 1961 and they had two children – Jonathon (born 1964) and Elisabeth (born 1966) – and they continue to attend at the Church of the Good Shepherd.  Beryl helped serve in the forces Canteen during the war and later married Ken Symmons in 1951.  They had two daughters – Jane (born in 1953) and Wendy (born 1959) and later moved into 89 Radnor Road in Bishopston where Beryl still lives.  Beryl has attended at St Michael & All Angels Church all her life and shortly after the war took over as Infant Sunday School teacher from Betty Hart and continued serving in this capacity for over 60 years.

 

Deacon, Olive                                                                                                                     26

Olive was born in Bristol about September 1922 the only child of Thomas and Elizabeth Deacon (nee Bryant), who had married there in about December 1916.  Her father served in France with the Royals Engineers from about 1917, later transferring to the Norfolk Regiment the following year.  During the Second World War she joined the Women’s Land Army in about March 1943 and met and married Lawrence Brightman in Bristol about the same time.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Decorations, Military                                                                                                          56

The awards won by those listed on the Church Roll included one DSO, 4 DFCs, 2 DSMs, one MBE, 2 MCs, 2 MMs, one Croix de Guerre, one Oak Leaves and 6 MIDs.

 

Demobilisation                                                                                                                    60

This was a slow process, with those having served longest being the first to be released, but by March 1946 the Rev D B Hall records that only about 115 of those listed on the Church Roll had been demobilised since V E Day.

 

Denley, Eric                                                                                                      29, 30, 43, 52

Eric and his twin brother Francis were born in Bristol about December 1921 to William and Mabel Denley (nee Benjamin), who had married there about June 1918.  They lived at 77 Bishop Road in Bishopston, together with their older sister Beatrice who was born about March 1920.  Eric’s father originally came from Cheltenham and enlisted with the 10th Battalion of the Gloucester Regiment during the First World War.  He went to France with them on the 9th of August 1915 as part of the 1st Brigade of the 1st Infantry Division.  He would have seen considerable action at the battles of Loos, Somme and 3rd Ypres before his unit was disbanded on the 14th of February 1918 and he was transferred to the Labour Corps for the rest of the war.  He was also an accomplished cricketer who played for Bishopston Cricket Club.  During the Second World War Eric was called up by the RAF and the Hall Mark records that in September 1943 he was working as part of the ground crew servicing bombers day & night.  After a period on embarkation leave he was due to be shipped out to the Far East in July 1945.  Prior to this he had met and married Berwyn Harrod in Sleaford about September 1944, which was near his airbase in Lincolnshire.  The arrival of a piece of wedding cake was duly noted in the Hall Mark that month.  After the war they returned to Bristol where their daughter Susan was born in about December 1949.

 

Denley, Francis                                                                                                           30, 47

Twin brother of Eric (see above), he was also called up by the RAF and was working with the ground crew servicing bombers day & night in September 1943.  By February 1945 he was listed by the Rev D B Hall as one of several “victims” of a recent rush to matrimony.  He had in fact met and married Gladys Williams in June 1944 at Basford near his airbase in Nottinghamshire.  They also returned to Bristol after the war and had two boys – John born about December 1953 and Nicholas in about June 1957.

 

Dennis, Brian                                                                                                                15, 28

Called up to serve with the RAF Overseas Delivery Unit, he was listed as missing believed killed while delivering a Wellington bomber to Malta on the 11th of September 1941– see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Dennis, Jim                                                                                                                   38, 41

Bernard James Dennis was born in Bristol about December 1912 to George and Irene Dennis (nee Baker), who had married in Wells the previous April.  Prior to this his father had been boarding at 9 Elton Road in Bishopston and was working for HM Customs & Excise.  Jim’s younger brother Graham Thomas (known as Tom – see below) was born about December 1914, followed by his sister Lesley and youngest brother Lionel about June 1919 and June 1924 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Jim was called up by the RAF and was working with the rank of sergeant at a Radio Location Unit in March 1944.  Before the war he had met and married Nora Read in Bristol about June 1936 and their eldest son Martin was born in Newton Abbot in Devon about June 1941.  According to the Hall Mark his second son Christopher was born in Bristol about June 1944 and baptised shortly afterwards by the Rev Hall.

 

Dennis, Lionel                                                                                             18, 20, 34, 41, 59

Brother of Jim (see above), he was born in Bristol about June 1924.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the Merchant Navy in September 1942.  By January 1943 he had been torpedoed and spent 5 days in an open boat before eventually reached safety after trekking through an African jungle.  He later met up with John Jolly in Freetown, West Africa about January 1944 and, after several trips to Argentina, was torpedoed for a second time about September 1944.  By March 1946 the Hall Mark records that he was moored indefinitely to the Jahore Causeway at Singapore in a supply ship with no supplies.  After the war he met and married Sheila Johnson in Bristol about March 1953.  They later moved to Newton Abbott in Devon, where their eldest daughter Christine was born about June 1957 followed by the twins Jane and Rita in about June 1961.

 

Dennis, Tom                                                                                          22, 30, 34, 38, 41, 60

Brother of Jim (see above), Graham Thomas Dennis was born in Bristol about December 1914.  According to the Hall Mark he was a former member of the Bible Class and was called up by the Army and posted to India about September 1943.  Prior to this he had married Betty Lovell (see below) in Bristol about June 1942.  She was later called up by the ATS about January 1943.  By January 1944 he was serving with the 14th Army in Burma with Paul Davis and received his baptism of fire during the battle of the Admin Box the following month.   He was advancing towards Rangoon in September 1944 and by about March 1946 was included in the list of those who had been demobilised since   V E Day.  After the war he and Betty moved to Barnstaple in Devon where their daughter Linda was born about September 1950, followed by their son Graham in about September 1953.

 

Dennis, Wilfred                                                                                                 38, 45, 53, 62

Although I have not been able to trace his earlier family history, the Hall Mark notes that he was called up by the Army and became a sergeant in the Tanks (which the Rev Hall thought very appropriate for some reason) and had been on Home Service for several years by March 1944.  He later served in France and Germany (where he was wounded) and by February 1945 was seen by the Rev Hall at home on leave “with a bandaged head and his usual broad grin”.  By July 1945 he was seen walking out with a nurse called Isabel Fisher, which had turned into an engagement by March 1946 and they eventually married in Wells (Somerset) the following September.  Their sons Robert and Ian were later born in Bristol about December 1951 and June 1954 respectively.

 

 

Denton, John                                                                                                                      45

John was born in Bristol about December 1923 to Norman and Dorothy Denton (nee Tew), who had married in Cardiff about September 1918.  His sister Stella had been born earlier in about September 1920.  During the middle years of the Second World War he trained as a pilot with the RAF and had earned the DFC by February 1945, having been posted to his Squadron the previous September.  After the war he met and married Molly Woodward in Bristol about June 1946 and they had 3 boys – the eldest was Peter who was born about December 1949, followed by Roger in about June 1951 and Robin about March 1961.

Donegue, Frances                                                                                                         26, 34

Frances was born in Bristol about September 1924 to James and Cissie Donegue (nee Nash), who had married there about December 1920.  Her elder sister Freda had also been born in Bristol about March 1923.  She was called up by the ATS about March 1943 and, according to the edition of the Hall Mark published in January 1944, had been chased all night by mice.  She had married William Harper in Bristol about December 1943 and their eldest daughter Freda was born there in about December 1944.  After the war the family moved to Sodbury in Gloucestershire, where their second daughter Eileen was born in about March 1947.

 

Dowling, Ken                                                                                                                      18

Although I have been unable to trace his parents, the records show that Ken was born in Bristol about September 1921 and that his sister Mary followed in about December 1927.  His mother’s maiden name was Davey.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving at sea with the Royal Navy by September 1942.  Shortly after he enlisted in the Royal Navy he married Betty Aust in Bristol about September 1941 and after the war their son Stephen was born there in about December 1950.

 

Down, Rev R H                                                                                             9, 12, 21, 26, 33

He had taken over from the Rev Murray as priest in charge at the Church of the Good Shepherd by September 1940, after which time the church flourished and he even wrote an article for the Hall Mark in April 1943.  Although in poor health, he later accepted the living of Warmley and was inaugurated there on the 18th of March 1944.

 

Drake, Francis                                                                                                                    34

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Francis was born in Bristol about September 1919 and that his mother’s maiden name was Howe.  According to the Hall Mark he had been posted to India by January 1944.  Prior to this he had met and married Gladys Johnston in Bristol about January 1942 and their eldest son Frederick was born there the following September.  Their daughter June followed in about March 1945 and their youngest son David in about December 1949.

 

Duckham, Syd                                                                                             22, 30, 42, 45, 52

Syd was born in Bristol about September 1924, the only son of Harry and Edith Duckham (nee Farr), who had married there about September 1923.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Royal Navy about January 1943 and had been promoted to Leading Wireless Operator by September.  He was serving in the Far East by September 1944 and was still there in February 1945 but had returned home by July.  After the war he met and married Margaret Souls in Bristol about September 1949 and their son Martin was born there in about June 1950, followed by his sister Lois in June 1953.

 

Dyer, Mervyn                                                                                              19, 24, 30, 52, 60

Mervyn was born in Bristol about June 1921, the only child of Fred and Emily Dyer (nee Berry).  Before the war the family lived in Denmark Place and attended at St Michael & all Angels Church which was nearby.  He was called up quite early in the war and was serving as an Army cook in the Middle East by September 1942.  He had been posted to Paiforce (10th Army) in Basra (Iraq) by March 1943 and by September 1943 he was back in Palestine.  He eventually came back home on leave about July 1945 and by March 1946 was serving in Germany with the BAOR.  After the war he moved to Blackpool in Lancashire where he met and married Agnes Dawson in about June 1946 and their son Andrew was born there about September 1948, followed by his sister Gillian in about June 1954.

E

Earl, Alex                                                                                                                            30

Alex was born in Bristol about June 1922 the second son of Sam and Mary Earl (nee Chater), who had married in Northampton about June 1918.  His elder brother Major was born about September 1920 and his younger brother Tony in about December 1924.  The family lived in Monk Road in Bishopston before the war and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, from where the boys went on to attend the Isle of Wight camps run by Bishop Vining.  It is not quite clear when Alex was called up but he had returned from service in Freetown (Sierra Leone, West Africa) “sporting a large bush hat” by September 1943.  According to the Rev Hall he had met many native soldiers there from Lagos who thought the world of Bishop Vining.  After the war he met and married Barbara Febery (see below) in Bristol about September 1947 and their daughters – Briony and Melanie – were born there about June 1955 and March 1958 respectively.

 

Earl, Tony                                                                                                                           25

Brother of Alex (see above), he was born in Bristol about December 1924 and was called up about March 1943.  Many years after the war had ended he met and married Margaret Hall in Bristol about June 1964, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Eaton, “Bill”                                                                                               38, 40, 45, 53, 60

Although I have not been able to trace Bill’s early family history, the records show that he was born in Bristol about June 1916 and that his mother’s maiden name was Cox.  It is not clear when he was called up but the Hall Mark notes that he was seriously ill in a hospital in Italy following an operation in about March 1944.  He was still there the following September but was back home convalescing by February 1945 and had been invalided out by the following July.  After the war he met and married Ann Hinton in Bristol about September 1962 and their daughter Carolyn was born there about September 1965.

 

Edney, Alma                                                                                                                       22

Sister of Geoffrey (see below), she was born in Bristol about June 1913 the only daughter of Henry George and Mabel (or May) Edney (nee Skuse), who had married in Bristol about September 1906.  Her older brother Roy was born in Bristol about September 1911 and the family was living at 1 Upper Belmont Road in Bishopston.  His father Henry was a pre war Territorial soldier who served as a driver of horsed transport with the RASC in the 61st (South Midland) Division in France from about June 1916.  He would therefore have seen action at Fromelles and Third Ypres and on the Somme in the spring of 1918.  At some point the family moved to Hendon in Middlesex where her youngest brother Geoffrey was born about December 1921.  The family returned to Bishopston during the inter war years and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  Alma later took over the running of the Guides from Miss Webber (see below) in 1936 as she moved to take over the Brownies.  She later married Henry Wood in Bristol about June 1943 and their son Terence was born there about December 1945.

 

Edney, Geoffrey                                                                                                            38, 40

Brother of Alma (see above), Geoffrey was born in Hendon in Middlesex about December 1921.  The family later returned to Bishopston during the inter war years, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Geoffrey joined the Royal Marines in 1938 and had seen 6 years service with them by March 1944.  Shortly before this he had met and married Doreen Wright in East Ham (London) about January 1944.  His unit took part in the Normandy invasion in June 1944 where he was wounded and sent back at home by September.  After this he and his wife moved to Carlisle, where his son Geoffrey was born the following December.

 

Edwards, Eileen                                                                                                                  23

Eileen was born in Bristol about December 1920, the eldest daughter of Francis and Dorothy Edwards (nee Quirk) who had married there about December 1915.  Her sister Thelma (see below) was also born in Bristol about June 1925.  According to the Hall Mark, Eileen was called up by the WAAF about January 1943.  After the war she met and married Reginald Pearce in Bristol about March 1950 and their daughters Ann and Fiona were born there about September 1951 and March 1954 respectively.

 

Edwards, Thelma                                                                                                          29, 53

Sister of Eileen (see above), she was also born in Bristol about June 1925.  According to the Hall Mark, she was called up by the Women’s Services about September 1943 and was serving with the BLA in Germany by July 1945.  After the war she met and married Ronald Jones in Bristol about December 1945.  They had several children but unfortunately I have not been able to identify them individually from the birth records.

 

Eltis, Rev Martin                                                                                                           42, 46

A native of Czechoslovakia, he took over from the Rev T Bland about September 1944, the latter having departed to a Parish in Coventry.  He had been in England for 6 years and had worked for 30 years as a solicitor before coming to this country.  By February 1945 he had settled down and was doing splendidly according to the Rev Hall.  He was very popular and encouraged the girls to form their own cricket club as part of an effort to make more provision for girls generally within the parish.

 

Evans, Ken                                                                                                                    17, 28

He was called up by the RAF and killed in action during a bombing raid over Germany on the 9th of May 1942 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Eyers, Colin                                                                                                        8, 12, 17, 28

Called up by the Army in 1939 he was killed in action while serving in France with the 2/5th Queen’s Royal Regiment on the 21st of May 1940 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

F

Fare, Douglas                                                                                             18, 34, 42, 45, 52

Douglas was born in Bristol about March 1921, the youngest son of Frederick and Mary Fare (nee Alderman), who had married in Keynsham about September 1916.  His older brother Harold was also born in Bristol about September 1919.  His father served with the 9th Rifle Brigade during the First World War and saw action on the Somme and at Third Ypres where he was awarded a DCM on the 22nd of October 1917.  In 1918 his Battalion was severely mauled in the Somme battles of the German Spring Offensive and returned home after being reduced to cadre strength.  However they were soon made up to strength again and returned to France in July 1918 in time to take part in the final advance in Picardy.

 

After the war the family moved to Bishopston and was living in Monmouth Road before the Second World War.  According to the Hall Mark, Douglas was serving as sea with the Royal Navy by September 1942.  By January 1944 he had been promoted to Sub Lieutenant and by the following September was serving on HMS Valiant – a Queen Elizabeth class 15 inch gun battleship that had already seen considerable action in the Mediterranean. At this time she was deployed in operations with the Eastern Fleet in the Far East but by August had been damaged in a Dry Dock accident at the port of Tricomalee in Ceylon (Sri Lanka).  By December she had returned home for a major refit and saw no further action in the war.  After the war Douglas met and married Gwyneth Evans in Bristol about June 1951 and their son Michael was born there about September 1954.

 

Farrow, George                                                                                                  5, 18, 37, 56

George was born in Bristol about June 1919 the only child of Ernest and Bernice Farrow (nee Passmore), who had married there about March 1916.   They settled in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where George became a keen member of the Bible Class.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving with the Army in March 1940 and had been posted to India by September 1942.  By March 1944 he had arrived in the Middle East with a famous Indian Regiment and was still there in November 1945, having just had an operation for a hernia.  Before he was posted overseas he met and married Joyce Garner in Bristol about June 1942.  After the war they moved to Worthing in Sussex, where their daughter Rosalind was born about March 1951

 

Farrow, Joan                                                                                                                53, 57

Although I have not been able to trace her parents, the birth records show that Joan was born in Bristol about June 1922 and that her mother’s maiden name was Jenkins.  According to the Hall Mark, she was called up by the Women’s Services some time after February 1945 and her marriage to Clifford Hayes in Bristol the following September was noted in the November edition of the Newsletter.  Their daughter Brenda was born in Bristol about September the following year and their son Geoffrey followed in June 1955.

 

Fatal Casualties of the War                                                                                               56

By November 1945 the Rev Hall estimated that there had been a total of 57 fatal casualties during the war – 33 were in the RAF, 11, in the Army, 8 in the Royal Navy, 4 in the Merchant Service and one in the ATS.  Of these 11 were killed in flying accidents, 2 in road or rail accidents, 2 in air raids, 2 as POWs and 4 died of illness while on service, leaving only 36 who actually died in combat.  [Note: the final total (including those listed on the Church of the Good Shepherd’s war memorial) was 67, of which 37 were in the RAF (10 of which died in flying accidents), 15 in the Army (including the ATS), 9 in the Royal Navy, 3 in the Merchant Navy and 3 in the Auxiliary Fire Service.  The Rev Hall’s list excludes the 3 members of the Parish who died in November 1940 while serving with the Auxiliary Fire Service, 2 members (1 from the Army and 1 from the RAF) included on the Church of the Good Shepherd memorial but missing from this list and Denis Baker, Frederick Parker and Leslie Grice who were added to the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) later.]

 

Febery, Barbara                                                                                                                 29

Barbara and her twin sister Jean were born in Bristol about March 1918 to Thomas and Frances Febery (nee Greenham), who had married there about December 1916.  According to the Hall Mark, Barbara was called up by the Women’s Services about September 1943.  After the war she met and married Alex Earl (see above) in Bristol about September 1947 and their daughters – Briony and Melanie – were born there about June 1955 and March 1958 respectively.

 

Fennell, Howard                                                                                                                 46

Howard was born in Bristol about September 1926, the only child of Richard and Violet Fennell (nee Joyner), who had married there about December 1924.  His father had served with the Welsh Guards during the later years of the First World War and would have seen action during the battles at Third Ypres, the German Spring Offensive and the final advance to the Selle before being discharged in March 1919.  According to the Hall Mark, Howard was called up by the Army some time after September 1944.  After the war he met and married Beryl Dyer in Bristol about March 1956 and their sons Christopher and Michael were born there about March 1957 and September 1968 respectively.

 

Fisher, Ken                                                                                     11, 15, 16, 46, 52, 60, 61

Ken was born in Bristol about June 1922 to Herbert and Edith Fisher (nee Bastin), who had married in Cheltenham about March 1921.  His sister Joan followed in about March 1926.  His father served in France with the 1st Gloucestershire Regiment from the 28th of November 1914 and would have seen action at the battles of Loos, the Somme abd Third Ypres before he transferred to the Labour Corps towards the end of 1917.  During the inter-war years the family settled in Bishopston and Ken became a keen member of the local 61st Bristol Scout Troop.  By March 1941 he was acting as joint leader of the Troop with Ken Garrett and was still there in February 1942.  However, he had been called up by the Navy by September 1942 and by Christmas 1944 he was back home on leave in time to read one of the lessons for the church carol service. Some time after this he was posted to the Middle East.  By July 1945 he had met up with Basil Stirratt in Cairo after spending a lot of his time engaged in various small boat operations doing what he called “dodging round the Dodecanese”.  He was eventually back helping with the Scouts by March 1946.  After the war he met and married Hilary Rich (see below) in Bristol about June 1949 and their children Anthony and Rebecca were born there about September 1951 and December 1959 respectively.

 

Flook, Geoffrey                                                                                                                   59

Geoffrey was born in Bristol about March 1920 to Albert and Elsie Flook (nee James), who had married there about January 1916.  His older sister Evelyn was also born in Bristol about December 1916.  He was called up quite early in the war and in March 1946 the Rev Hall noted that after serving through the India and Burma campaigns, Geoffrey had arrived at Bangkok in Siam (now Thailand).  After the war he met and married Doris Whittle in Bristol about December 1947 and their daughter Susan was born there about March 1948, followed by their two boys Robert and Malcolm in about June 1951 and September 1953 respectively.

 

Fluck, Leonard                                                                                                                    61

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he arrived at St Michael and All Angels Church about March 1946, after having been appointed as Organist and Choirmaster in succession to Mr Lumbard who had held these appointments on a temporary basis ever since Paddy Westcott had retired in January 1943.  He was an ARCO and very well qualified to bring the music up to the standard set by the former incumbent.  He later took over as organist at All Saints Church in the centre of Bristol in about 1949 but sadly died while giving an organ recital in St James Priory Church.

 

Force, Maurice                                                                                                                   53

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the birth records show that Maurice was born in South Stoneham in Hampshire about March 1921 and that his mother’s maiden name was Fann.  Some time after this the family moved to the Bishopston where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Maurice was called up by the Army and was serving with the BLA in Germany by July 1945.  After the war he met and married Annise Addison in Bristol about June 1961, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Ford, Joyce                                                                                                                         34

Joyce was born in Bristol about December 1924 to Charles and Annie Ford (nee Leak), who had married there about June 1919.  Her older sister Irene was also born in Bristol about June 1920 followed by her brother Charles in September 1922 and her younger sister Phyllis in December 1930.  According to the Hall Mark, Joyce was called up by the Women’s Services about January 1944.  After the war she met and married Allan Hunt in Bristol about September 1947 and their daughter Susan was born there about March 1951 followed by their son Peter in about March 1954.

 

Ford, Raymond                                                                                                                   46

Raymond was born in Dursley in Gloucestershire about June 1924, the youngest son of Charles and Rosa Ford (nee Cook) who had married there about December 1914.  His older sisters Rosa and Amy were also born in Dursley about September 1917 and December 1918 respectively.  During the inter-war years the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at the St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Raymond was called up by the Army after September 1944.  After the war Raymond returned to Bristol but does not seem to have married.

 

Forward, Maurice                                                                                                               19

Maurice was born in Bristol about December 1919 to Stanley and Emily Forward (nee Williams), who had married in St Columb in Cornwall about September 1916.  His brother Kenneth and sister Joan were also born in Bristol about September 1923 and December 1927 respectively.  During the inter-war period the family moved to Bishopston and was living in Monmouth Road when the Second World War broke out.  Maurice was called up quite early in the war and was serving in Gibraltar by September 1942.  After the war he met and married Annie Sherriff in Stoke Newington in London, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Foster, Harold                                                                                                              19, 34

Although I have not been able to trace his early family history, the Hall Mark notes that he was serving with the Army in West Africa in September 1942 and had been posted to India by January 1944, together with a promotion to the rank of Captain.  After the war he met and married Matilda Bessell in Bristol about December 1954, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Fowler, Cliff                                                                                                      22, 34, 41, 53

I have not been able to trace Cliff’s early history, but the records show that he was born in Bristol about September 1926 and that his sister Joan followed in about June 1930.  His mother’s maiden name was Beake.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up about January 1943 and was serving in India by January 1944.  By September 1944 he was in Burma with the 14th Army and after fighting his way across 1,000 miles of jungle, was present at the capture of Rangoon at the end of May 1945.  He does not appear to have married after the war had ended.

 

Francombe, Kathleen                                                                                                 54, 62

Kathleen was born in Bristol about June 1925 to Wilfred and Mildred Francombe (nee Farbrother), who had married there about December 1921.  Her sisters Margaret and Joan were also born in Bristol about March 1923 and September 1927 respectively.  The family lived in Monmouth Road in Bishopston before the war and Kathleen later became engaged to Eric Morgan (see below) about July 1945. They were married in the Church of the Good Shepherd in April 1946 and their daughter Jennifer was born about September 1948, followed by their son Richard in about September 1950.

 

Frost, John                                                                                                              25, 34, 53

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the birth records show that John was born in Bristol about December 1924 and that his mother’s maiden name was Meaker.  According to the Hall Mark, he was called up by the RAF about March 1943 and was shot down in a bombing raid over Germany about January 1944.  He was taken prisoner and eventually repatriated at the end of May 1945.  After the war he met and married Winifred Whale in Bristol about September 1947 and their son Geoffrey was born there about September the following year.

 

Fry, Basil                                                                                                           22, 25 41, 60

Basil was born in Chipping Sodbury in Gloucestershire about September 1924, the only child of Rupert and Mrs Fry (nee Richardson), who had married there about June 1922.  Some time after this the family moved to Bishopston where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the RAF about January 1943 and trained as a sergeant navigator in a light bomber in Rhodesia from about March 1943 until he returned home in the summer of 1944.  Thereafter he served as a pathfinder in bomber command, earning himself a DFC in the process.  He later signed on for another 18 months in March 1946.  I have not been able to trace whether he subsequently married after the war had ended.

G

Gamage, Sidney                                                                                                                 60

Sidney was born in Swansea about December 1914 to Charles Thomas and Rebecca Gamage (nee Banfield), who had married there in about March 1906.  In 1911 they were living at 23 Kensington Crescent in Swansea, together with his sister Stella (born about December 1906) and his brother Edward (born about March 1910).  He also had an older brother – Barrington Banfield Gamage – who was born about in January 1909 but died about March 1910.  His father was a marine engineer and after the First World War moved to the Bishopston area of Bristol, where the family attended at the St Michael & all Angels Church, where Sidney later became a keen member of the Bible Class.  According to the Hall Mark, Sidney was called up for military service during the Second World War and in March 1946 was included in the list of those who had been demobilised since VE Day.  Shortly before this he had married Winifred Jarrett in Bristol about September 1944 and their daughter Kathleen was born there about June 1946.

 

Garrett, Ken                                                                                                                  11, 38

Ken was born in Bristol about March 1922 to Robert William and Ada Garrett (nee Hassall), who had married there about June 1920.  His sister Margaret followed in about September 1928.  His father lived at 55 Falmouth Road in Bishopston before the First World War and worked as a clerk for a leather manufacturer.  His uncle – George Garrett – died of TB while serving with the 6th Somerset Light Infantry in January 1915 (see the Parish War Memorial for the 1914-1918 War), while his father served with the 2/4th Battalion of the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry.  He went to France with the 61st Division in May 1916 and saw considerable action at Fromelles, Langemaarck, Cambrai, the German Spring Offensive and the advance in Picardy.

 

The family lived in Radnor Road before the Second World War and Ken was a keen scout.  He became joint leader of the 61st Bristol (St Michael & All Angels) Scout Troop with Ken Fisher in March 1941 but was later called up by the RAF.  He is recorded as being on Home Service in March 1944 with the rank of Leading Aircraftsman.  After the war he met and married Doris Bailey in Penzance in Cornwall about September 1946. They settled in Bristol, where they had 3 children – Susan, Simon and Sally – who were born about June 1948, March 1953 and March 1960 respectively.

 

Gelsthorpe, Bishop                                                                                                        14, 18

He was the Assistant Bishop of Egypt and Sudan in February 1942.  He was based at Khartoum and by the following September only Alf Wallis had managed to follow up the Rev Hall’s suggestion to call on him to arrange a trip to see the Pyramids.

 

Gibbs, Norman                                                                                                       46, 52

Norman was born in Bristol about December 1925 to William and Edith Gibbs (nee Pritchard), who had married there about September 1919.  His brother Ronald (see below) was born 2 years earlier in about March 1923.  The family attended at St Michael & all Angels Church during the inter war years and Norman was a former winner of the Richards Prize.  He was called up by the Army during the latter part of the Second World War and was training with the OCTU in February 1945.  He was heading out to the Far East the following November, having enjoyed a period of embarkation leave.  After the war he met and married Audrey Wright in Bristol about September 1952 and they had 2 children – Andrew and Elizabeth who were born about December 1955 and September 1963 respectively.

 

Gibbs, Ron                                                                                                              35, 42, 52

He was Norman’s older brother (see above), who was born in Bristol about March 1923.  According to the Hall Mark he was training with the RAF in Canada in September 1944 and was back home by July 1945.  Prior to this he had met and married Betty Gouldsworthy (see below) in about January 1944, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Gibson, David                                                                                    6, 17, 18, 20, 35 53, 60

David was born in Bristol about March 1921 to Christopher and Ellen Gibson (nee Ranger), who had married in Long Ashton about September 1913.  His older brother John was also born in Bristol about September 1914.  His father originally came from Cleveden in Somerset, where he worked for the Post Office as a sorting clerk and telegrapher.  He also served in the Royal Engineers and Tank Corps from about 1917.  The family settled in the Bishopston area of Bristol during the inter war years and attended at St Michael & all Angels Church, where David later became a Sunday School Teacher.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the Royal Navy in March 1940 and had been posted to an armed merchant trawler by September 1942.  He later wrote to the Denis Hall towards the end of that year suggesting that advancing years had seen a decline in the Rev’s former wrestling skills.  In January 1944 he was contemplating marriage to Mary Stevens (see below), which duly took place in Bristol the following June.  In July 1945 he is recorded as serving in Australia and by March 1946 he had been added to the list of those who had been demobilised since V E Day.   He and his wife Mary later had 2 children – Wendy and Christopher – who were both born in Bristol about December 1948 and June 1954 respectively.

 

Gillam,Mr                                                                                                                           16

He ran Gillam’s Saw Mills at the top of Ashley Down Road.  It was his lorry that was used by the Parish carol singers for their fund raising effort on Christmas Eve.

 

Gillard, Lawrence                                                                       6, 22, 25, 41, 53, 56, 60, 61

Known by his second name, Alfred Lawrence Gillard was born in Bristol about September 1918 to Alfred and Dorothy Gillard (nee Poulter), who had married in Bristol about December 1915.  His sister Phyllis was born about June 1922 and the family lived in North Road before the war.  They attended at St Michael & All Angels Church where Lawrence served as a Sunday School Teacher and member of the Bible Class.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving with the RAF by March 1940 and was with the invasion force sent to North Africa in November 1942.  By March 1943 he had met up with Maurice Newport and Derek Warwick in Algiers and was in Corsica by September 1944.  According to the Rev Hall he was still unattached and unmarried in July 1945 and determined to remain that way.  He was expected home in November 1945 and was back by March 1946 and writing a play to be performed at the Isle of Wight Camp planned for the following August.  After the war he continued to entertain at many Parish functions and later married Doreen Baker (see above) about June 1949.  They lived near St Andrews Park for many years and were staunch supporters of the Orchard Players, who performed regularly in the Church Halls.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage and they are now both living in Weston Super Mare.

 

Gillard, Joan                                                                                                                       53

She was born in Bristol about December 1921 the only child of William and Ethel Gillard (nee Armstrong), who had married there in about July 1914. She was called up by the Women’s Services in July 1945 and later married Graham Lintern in Bristol in about September 1947 and their twin boys – Peter and Phillip – were born about June 1951.

 

Gillard, Phyllis                                                                                                                    25

Sister of Lawrence (see above) she was born about June 1922 and later married Ralph Vincent in Bristol about June 1943 (see below).  Their eldest daughters – Janthia and Valerie – were born in Bristol about December 1945 and December 1947 respectively.  Some time after this the family moved to Norton Radstock in Somerset, where their youngest daughter Diane was born about June 1958.

 

Girls Club                                                                                                         25, 33, 37, 52

One of the many church organisations, they were producing pantomimes and “making eyes at the boys” in March 1943 and were doing much the same under the wing of Miss Lye in January 1944.  On the 14th of February 1944 they held a mixed social in the scout room, exchanging about 10 Valentines in the process.  By July 1945 they were hoping to be given a new headquarters in the old Barrage Balloon Hut.

 

Gladys, Miss                                                                                                                        43

I have not been able to trace her family history but according to the Hall Mark she was a former parishioner, who converted to the Salvation Army about September 1944.

 

Gleave, Jack                                                                                      6, 20, 30, 34, 45, 53, 57

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the birth records show that Jack was born in Bristol about June 1915 and that his mother’s maiden name was Sunderland.  The family settled in the Bishopston area of Bristol during the inter war years and attended at St Michael & all Angels Church, where Jack later became a member of the Bible Class and a Sunday School Teacher.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the Army in March 1940 and had been promoted to full lieutenant by January 1943.  By September 1943 he had got married and gained an extra pip and still had that rank the following January. By this time he had also managed to find Peter Staite (a former Isle of Wight camper) at the end of the phone in North Africa.  By February 1945 he was serving with the 8th Army in Italy and by July he was with the BLA in Germany.  By November 1945 he was back home with the rank of Major.  During the war he met and married Bertha Alton in Belper (Derbyshire) about March 1943.  After the war he and Bertha settled in Belper and their eldest daughter Brenda was born there about March 1947 followed by Tony, Peter, Kathleen, Josephine, Margaret and Susan in about June 1948, September 1949, March 1952, June 1953, March 1956 and December 1960 respectively.

 

Godfrey, Tom                                                                                              18, 41, 45, 60

Tom was born in Bristol about December 1917 to Herbert and Gertrude Godfrey (nee Barber), who had married there the previous December.  His sister Brenda was also born in Bristol about March 1920 and another sister Pamela followed in about March 1931.  His father joined the 12th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment shortly after it was formed by the Citizens Recruiting Committee on the 30th of August 1914, rising to the rank of sergeant in B Company.  The Battalion went to France on the 21st of November 1915, eventually forming part of the 95th Brigade of the 5th Division in December.  The Division saw considerable action at the Somme, Arras and 3rd Ypres before being transferred to Italy where it was serving on the Piave in January 1918.  However, following the German Spring Offensive in March, the Division was back in France for the battle of the Lys by April and from August his Battalion was in almost continuous action until it was disbanded on the 19th of October.

 

During the inter-war years the family settled in the Bishopston area where Tom’s parents owned a bakers and confectioners on the Gloucester Road.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church where Tom became a keen member of the Bible Class.  Following the outbreak of the Second World War, Tom was serving with the Army in India in September 1942 and sent greetings to Bristol over the radio from there the following May.  He was serving in Burma with the 14th Army in September 1944 and by February 1945 had been promoted to Major.  He was eventually demobilised at the end of the war and was back home by March 1946.  After the war he met and married Pauline Tanton in Bristol about September 1956 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Goss, John                                                                                                                6, 38, 43

Although I have been unable to trace John’s family history, the Hall Mark has noted that he was a former scout, serving with an RAF Searchlight Battery in March 1940 and was still on Home Service by March 1944 having risen to the rank of sergeant. The Hall Mark also notes that in September 1944 he had been in the matrimonial limelight some time previously.

Gouldsworthy, Betty                                                                                                            35

Although I have not been able to trace her parent’s details, the birth records show that Betty was born in Bristol about September 1924 and that her mothers surname was Lee.  She later married Ron Gibbs (see above) in about January 1944.

 

Gover, Herbert                                                                                                                    41

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the birth records show that he was born in Bristol about September 1924 and that his mother’s maiden name was Lee.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving in France in September 1944.  He does not appear to have married after the war had ended.

 

Gover, Tom                                                                                                                         38

Tom was born in Christchurch in Hampshire about December 1914 the eldest son of Wilfred and Constance Gover (nee Worrall), who had married in Wareham in Dorset about January that year.  Before he married, Tom’s father lived in Swanage where he worked as an assistant in a gent’s outfitters.  The family settled in Christchurch where Tom’s sister Cicely and his brother Ronald were also born about March 1917 and March 1919 respectively.  However after the war the family moved to the Bishopston area of Bristol where his youngest brother Cyril was born about June 1923.  Tom later married Joyce Goodridge in Bristol about September 1939 and their daughter Susan was born there about June 1943.  According to the Hall Mark, Tom was called up by the Army about this time and was serving with an Airborne Unit in March 1944.

 

Green, Denis                                                                                                           17, 18, 57

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the birth records shown that he and his twin brother Raymond were born in Bristol about June 1920 and that their mother’s maiden name was Lovell.  Their older sister Rhoda was also born in Bristol about December 1911.  During the inter war years they lived at Belmont Road in the St Andrews area of Bristol and Denis became a keen member of the Bishopston Cricket Club.  He served with the Navy during the war and by September 1942 was on home leave after serving two and a half years in the Middle East.  He was back at sea the same month and was eventually demobilised about November 1945.  After the war he met and married Jeanne March in Bristol about June 1949 and their daughter Caroline was born there about March 1952.

 

Green, Derek                                                                                                                     57

Derek was born in Bristol about January 1928 to Percival and Elsie Green (nee Bowden), who had married there about September 1922.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Royal Navy in November 1945, just after the war had ended.  He later married Jacqueline Horsham in Bristol about September 1954 and eventually moved to Kingswood, where his sons Andrew and Stuart were born about March 1958 and June 1962 respectively.

 

Green, Fred                                                                                                           15, 19, 53

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the birth records show that Fred was born in Bristol about December 1916 and that his mother’s maiden name was Simmons.  Although his family lived in the Bishopston area of Bristol, he later married Florence Toogood in Bath about September 1940.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the RAF early on in the Second World War and was reported to be a prisoner in Italy by February 1942.  He was later reported to be in Canada or the USA the following September, although this information was probably incorrect or out of date.  He was eventually repatriated from Germany with the other POWs in July 1945.  After the war he and Florence moved to Yeovil where his daughter Christine was born about March 1950, followed by his son Martin in about September 1951.

 

Green, Raymond                                                                                                         18, 57

Twin brother of Denis (see above), he also served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War.  He was at sea in September 1942 and had been demobilised by November 1945.  After the war he married a Miss Neather in Bristol about June 1952.  I have not been able to trace his wife’s first name, or whether they had any children.  He eventually died in Bristol about March 1972 aged 51.

 

Greenfield, Margaret                                                                                        23, 25, 34, 60

Margaret was born in Boston in Lincolnshire about December 1923 to John and Sarah Greenfield (nee Sellars), who had married in Doncaster about September 1917.  Her elder brother John and younger sister Dorothy were also born in Boston about September 1918 and September 1928 respectively.  Some time after this they moved to the Bishopston area of Bristol where they attended at St Michael & all Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark Margaret was called up by the WRNS about January 1943 and was one of the first of the ladies to go abroad in January 1944 (although the Rev Hall initially placed her in the WAAF by mistake).   In March 1946 she was listed amongst those who had been demobilised since V E Day.  After the war she met and married Thomas Steele in Bristol about June 1948 and their son Paul was born there about June 1951, followed by Derek in June 1953 and Helen in September 1954.

 

Grey, Charles                                                                                                                      12

Charles was born in Marylebone in London about 1876 and later moved to Bristol where he worked as a travelling representative for the cycle industry.  By 1901 he had set up home with his wife Beatrice at 15 Sommerville Road in St Andrews.  They also had a domestic servant – Beatrice Fry aged 20 – living in residence with them at this time.  I have not been able to trace if they had any children.  Charles and Beatrice attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and became quite prominent in the management of its affairs and it was not surprising that he was called on to take over as chief organizer of the Services Canteen in September 1941 (see above).

 

Grey, Clifford                                                                                                                      61

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he had been called up by the RAF by March 1946.

 

Grey, Vernon                                                                                                                      38

Vernon was born on the Isle of Wight about March 1924 to Norman and Winifred Grey (nee Theakston), who had married in Southampton about January 1918.  His older sister Audrey was also born on the Isle of Wight in about December 1918.  The family later moved to the Bishopston area of Bristol where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Vernon was called up by the Army during the Second World War and was serving as a Lieutenant with an Airborne Unit by March 1944.  After the war he met and married Georgina Beechey in Bristol about September 1945 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Griffin, Jack                                                                                                                    6, 18 Jack was born in Bristol about June 1916 to Bertie and Ada Griffin (nee Fisher), who had married there in about June 1913.  His sister Betty followed later in about September 1918.  His father served as a driver in France with the motorised transport section of the RASC, ferrying stores and ammunition to the troops in the front line during the latter part of the First World War.  After the war the family settled in the Bishopston area of Bristol and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Jack served as a chorister.  Shortly after the Second World War was declared Jack met and married Patricia Albery in Bristol about December 1939.  He later joined the Royal Navy in March 1940 and was at sea by September 1942.  After completing his National Service he returned to Bristol and his daughter Helen was born there about December 1948.

 

Griffiths, Margaret                                                                                                        25, 43

Margaret was born in Bristol about March 1921 to Herbert and Lilian Griffiths (nee James).  Her two younger brothers Howard and John were also born in Bristol about March 1923 and June 1925 respectively, while her younger sister Doreen was born about December 1928.  Margaret was a former Girl Guide and according to the Hall Mark was called up by the WRNS about March 1943.  In September of the following year she married Charles Tyers and after the war they had 3 children – John, Alison and Richard – who were born in Bristol about March 1947, June 1952 and June 1956 respectively.

 

Gristock, Peter                                                                                                        34, 56, 60

Peter was born in Bridgewater about March 1918 to Albert and Phyllis Gristock (nee Williamson), who had married there about December 1916.  His father served with the RAMC in France during the last 2 years of the First World War.  The family moved to the Bishopston area of Bristol after the war and lived on the Gloucester Road, where his brother Douglas was born about December 1920.  According to the Hall Mark, Peter was called up by the Army about January 1944 and had been posted to India by November 1945.  By March 1946 he was listed amongst those who had been demobilised since V E Day.  After the war he met and married Vera Haynes in Bristol about September 1950 and their eldest son Kevin was born there about December 1951, followed by Nicholas in about June 1956.

 

Guides                                                                                                                                 22

The 15th (Bishopston Church) Girl Guides was formed about the same time as the Scouts and by 1917 was being run by a Ms F Jolin who lived at 49 Arley Hill in the Cotham area of Bristol.  Meetings took place in the Parish Halls on Wednesdays at 6.30 pm and on Saturdays at 3.00 pm.  By 1931 Miss Webber (see below) had taken over, although by 1936 she had given way to Miss Edney (see above) and switched to the Brownies.  In January 1943 the Guides were being run by Margaret Tiley (see below) assisted by Jean Wicks (see below).  The Berkeley Road Guides were being run by Barbara Brace (see above) and Betty Lloyd (see below) at this time.

 

Gunn, Brian                                                                                                            53, 56, 60

Brian was born in Bristol about March 1927 to Reginald and Ivy Gunn (nee Palfrey), who had married there about June 1924.  His sister Josephine followed in about March 1935.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Brian became a keen member of the Army Cadets which were run by the Rev Hall.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Army and by July 1945 was serving as a sergeant instructor at the tender age of 18.  He was posted to India the following November and by March 1946 was expected to join Bernard Day and Glyn Lewis at the Royal Artillery Dispersal Camp in India, in preparation for their return home.  He does not appear to have married after his return from service overseas.

H

Haggett, Jack                                                                                                          18, 30, 47

Although I have not been able to trace his early family history, the birth records shown that John James Haggett (otherwise known as Jack) was born in Bristol about December 1908 to Henry Richard and Clara Helen Haggett (nee Hudson), who had married there about June 1901.  In 1911 they were living at 2 Brookfield Avenue in Bishopston, together with his older sister Ivy Alexandra aged 9.  His maternal grandmother – Mary Ann Hudson (aged 72) – was also boarding with them.  His father was working as a travelling meat salesman for a firm of foreign meat importers at this time.  Jack joined the Merchant Navy after leaving school and the Hall Mark notes that he was at sea in September 1942 and at Ceylon (Sri Lanka) the following September.  He later met and married Hilda Creed in Bridport in Dorset about December 1944 and by February 1945 he had been added to the Rev Hall’s list of matrimonial victims.  After the war they had 2 daughters Rachel and Frances – both born in Bristol about June 1946 and June 1950 respectively.

 

Hale, Maurice                                                                                                               21, 28

A flight sergeant in the RAF, he was lost with the rest of his crew while in transit to Gibraltar on the 6th of December 1942 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Halls, Parish                                                                                             6, 9, 11, 49, 51, 57

The Parish Halls were taken over by the War Ministry in September 1939 and all the other users had to be housed in the Church, its Vestries, the Vicarage or the Church of the Good Shepherd.  The Halls were later taken over by the Home Guard and in March 1941 the lesser Hall was being used by the Services Canteen.  The Main Hall was used as a base by B Company (Major V P Barrand) of the 9th (Home Guard) Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment, while the Battalion HQ was at 99 Sommerville Road near St Andrew’s Park.  Small arms ammunition and explosives were stored in the Halls and small arms kept at Sommerville Road. The Halls were back under Parish control and being redecorated by May 1945 and the Sunday Schools were back in residence the following September.

Hall, the Rev Denis Bartlett                                        11, 14, 16, 25, 29, 32, 36, 43, 46

Denis was born in Long Ashton in Somerset to Frank Marshall and Caroline Beatrice Hall (nee Bartlett), who had married in Bristol about October 1894.  In 1901 they were living at 4 Henleaze Gardens in Westbury on Trym together with his brothers Robert Cecil Marshall (5) and Frank Leslie (3) and were still there in 1911, when his youngest brother Edward Marshall (8) had been added to the family.  His father was working as a District Manager for the London Assurance Company at 25 Baldwin Street in the centre of Bristol at this time, while his mother had worked in a milliner’s shop prior to her marriage.  I have not been able to trace the military service of the other brothers, but Frank was commissioned into the 1/4 Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment and went to France on 13th of October 1916, rising to the rank of Captain.  He arrived just in time for the battle of the Ancre and later took part in the advance to the Hindenburg Line and the battle of Langemarck before he was killed in action on the 27th of August 1917 aged 20.

 

After the war his eldest brother Robert became an insurance inspector while Denis and Edward both became clergymen.  His parents both continued to live at 4 Henleaze Gardens until the end of their days.  His mother later died on the 19th of July 1939 aged 75 leaving some £406 to her husband, who in turn died on the 3rd of October 1941 aged 73 leaving some £1,681 to be divided between Robert and his widowed sister in law Kathleen Marshall Hall.  Of the surviving brothers Edward was the first die in Bristol about March 1976 aged 73, followed by Denis in about June 1983 aged 84 and finally Robert in January 1994 aged 97.

 

As for Denis he was the Priest in Charge at St Michael & All Angels Church from 1930 -1947 and worked tirelessly to support his parishioners through these testing times.  He was particularly keen to ensure that all those serving with the forces overseas were kept up to date with what was happening in Bishopston.  He also took on many additional duties and by March 1941 he was already Vice Chairman for Air Raid Hostels, Group Shelter Marshall, AFS Chaplain and a Fire Watcher.  In February 1942 he had to fend for himself while his housekeeper was in Southmead Hospital and his housekeeping problems were only relieved when the Rev Bland came to stay at the Vicarage with his wife and small daughter in September 1942.  Their duties were later taken over by Daisy and Violet Westcott.  By March 1943 he had to deal with Lent, Confirmation Classes, Cadets, Home Guard, NFS, Canteen, Federation of Boys Clubs, Youth Committees and speaking engagements all over Bristol on Youth Work.  He also spent a lot time responding to letters from war weary soldiers, writing to them about what the war was for and the task before them when it was over.

 

After the war he was consecrated Assistant Bishop on the Niger in Westminster Abbey on the 25th April 1947 and spent the next 10 years as a missionary in West Africa, returning in 1953 and 1955 and stayed at Bishopworth Vicarage while visiting old friends in Bristol.  Ill health eventually forced him to return to England in 1957, whereupon he took over as Vicar of Thornton Heath in the Diocese of Canterbury.  He later became vicar of Tormarton in Gloucestershire before finally moving to a retirement home in Pembroke Road in Clifton where he died in about June 1983 aged 84.

 

Hall, the Rev Edward Marshall                                  7, 12, 17, 25, 34, 41, 45, 52, 57

Brother of the Rev D B Hall (see above) and fellow worker at annual camps, etc.  He also helped his brother in running the Parish when he first joined in 1930 but had moved on by 1936.  He volunteered for military service at the beginning of the war and was called up by the Army about 1940. He was posted as Chaplain to the Royal Artillery Officer Cadet Unit on Salisbury Plain (transferred from the Royal Military Academy at Woolwich) but by September 1941 he was serving as a Padre to a Medium Royal Artillery Regiment, although still based in England.  By September 1942 he had been posted to an Independent Company in Gibraltar and was still there in March 1943, and found enough time to serve as Chairman of the local servicemen’s Bristol and District Society.  By January 1944 he had been posted to the Middle East and then went to Italy, where he was in the thick of the action from May onwards.

 

By September 1944 his Regiment (the 2nd King’s (Liverpool) Regiment) had been specially mentioned for its action in holding the bridgehead on the Rapido River for the critical 48 hours of Operation Diadem.  This was massive breakout operation that had led to the capture of the key stronghold of Monte Cassino and the eventual liberation of Rome on the 5th of June.  By February 1945 he was in Athens, his unit having arrived there shortly before Christmas.  By this action the 8th Army was able to forestall a Communist take over in Greece, although they were unable to prevent the vicious Civil War that followed after they left.  By July 1945 he was back home at Bishopsworth, and planning the arrangements for the next youth camp with his brother and later wrote the camp “Rag” – a satirical piece known as the “Severn Bore”.  He later married on the 3rd of September 1949, although I have not been able to trace his wife’s name or whether they had any children, and eventually died in Bristol in March 1976 aged 73.

 

Hall, Sylvia                                                                                                                          47

Sylvia was born in 1925 to James and Gertrude Hall (nee Day) about September 1925, who had married there about June 1920.  She had 2 brothers – Lawrence (born about June 1921) and Geoffrey (born about June 1929) and at that time was living with her family at Bost Road near the Horfield Army Barracks.  Her father served his apprenticeship with the Rees Gents Outfitters Shop in Bedminster before the First World War and from 1920 to 1939 worked for William Fall who owned the gent’s outfitters shop in the Gloucester Road opposite the old Bristol North swimming baths, which is now occupied by the charity shop “Tenovus”.  In 1940 he bought the shop from William Fall’s widow and the family moved into flat above the shop.  Business was fairly brisk and her father later took on Ron Stinson (see below) as his unpaid assistant.  There was a sizable garden to the rear of the shop, which came in handy in providing vegetables to supplement the food shortages caused by wartime rationing.  The building also had a secure water supply and the family did not suffer from the water shortages that were so common elsewhere in Bishopston during the Blitz.

 

Her father served with distinction in the Royal Artillery during the First World War, earning a Military Medal in the process.  He enlisted on the outbreak of war and went to France in about March 1915, serving continuously on the Western Front until he was wounded shortly before the war ended in November 1918.  He was medically discharged in 1919 and returned to work in the gent’s outfitters shop for the rest of his career.  During the Second World War he volunteered for the Auxiliary Fire Service and saw considerable action during the bombing of both Bristol and Exeter.  Meanwhile back at home his wife and daughter carried on his gent’s outfitters business.

 

The family attended St Michael & All Angels Church before the war and Sylvia later became a Sunday School Teacher there.  Before the war she worked in the office of a duplicator factory near Bristol Bridge, which was later bombed out 3 times during the Blitz, and she finally ended up working on Whiteladies Road.  Like her father she served with the AFS during the war, the work comprising mainly telephone and clerical duties.  After the Blitz had ended she started to help out in her father’s shop and was later exempted from National Service in order to continue this vital business.

 

In about 1941 she met George Warburton (see below) at the Services Canteen that was then being run in the Parish Halls on Pigsty Hill.  They later became engaged in February 1945 and eventually married in 1948 after George had recovered from the tuberculosis he had acquired while serving with the Army in Europe.  They had 3 children Madeleine (born 1949), Richard (born 1951) and Caroline (born 1954).  At first they lived at Highbury Road in Horfield but later moved to 12 Lancashire Road in Bishopston, where they lived together for more than 60 years until George died in 2011.  After the war her brother Geoffrey was called up by the Army and sent to Malaya where the troops were fighting a bitter battle against communist insurgents.  Unfortunately he was killed in a car accident in about July 1949, shortly before he was due to be shipped back home.

 

Handford, Arvilla Harriet                                                                                           14, 16

She was born in Walton on the Hill near Bootle in about June 1890, the eldest daughter of William and Georgina Meredith Handford (nee Graham) who had married there in about December 1882.  At that time she lived at 28 Enslow Street at Walton on the Hill, together with her brothers William and James.  Her father, who came from Bridgnorth in Shropshire, was working there as a railway clerk.  Her maternal uncle – Arthur Graham (aged 29) – was also living with them and serving as a First Officer in the Merchant Navy.  By 1901 they had moved to 29 Belle Vue Road in the Easton area of Bristol and her younger sister Medina aged 9 had been added to the family.  Her father was still working as a railway clerk as were her brothers William and James.

 

By 1911 the family had moved to 37 Burghley Road near St Andrew’s Park.  Her brother James had left home by this time, having met and married Beatrice Hathaway in Bristol in about July 1910.  However, William was still there and working with his father as a clerk in a Railway Goods Depot.  He later met and married Mary Brain in about September 1911 and their daughter Kathleen was born about March 1914, followed after the war by Alfred and Denis in about June 1921 and March 1924 respectively.  James and his wife meanwhile were living at 15 Coronation Avenue in Fishponds, together with his sister Medina, who was working as a draper’s assistant.  His baby son Eric (born in February 1911) was also present at this time and his daughter Grace followed in about June 1915.  I have not been able to trace James’ military record but William was a pre war Territorial soldier and went to France with the 1/6 Gloucestershire Regiment on the 31st of March 1915.  He was therefore involved in several major battles, including the offensives on the Somme and at 3rd Ypres.  He finished the war with his Battalion in Italy, where he saw further action at the Asiago Plateau and Vittoria Veneto before returning home in 1919.

 

After the war her sister Medina met and married Reginald Warn about March 1920 and their son John (see below) was born in Bristol about June 1926.  As for Harriet she remained at home to care for her parents who by 1914 had moved to 13 Nottingham Road in Bishopston, from where they would have attended at the local St Michael & all Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Harriet had taken charge of the Cubs in about 1917 and was still “haranguing” them in March 1941.  However, she surprised everyone by marrying the former scout leader Arthur Webber in September 1942 – see below.

 

Harding, Edgar (“Granny”)                                                                                    6, 38, 61

Edgar was born in Bristol about December 1919 to Frank and Mary Harding (nee Davies), who had married there about January 1916.  Their eldest son Frank had also been born in Bristol about December 1916 and Edgar was followed by Irene, Eileen, Gilbert, and Victor who were born about December 1920, March 1921, December 1922 and December 1925 respectively.  The family settled in the Bishopston area of Bristol and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Edgar later became a Sunday School Teacher.  According to the Hall Mark, Edgar had joined the RAF by March 1940 and was still on Home Service by March 1944, having advanced to the rank of Sergeant.  By March 1946 he was placed on the list of those who had been demobilized since V E Day and had handed out prizes at the previous Sunday School Christmas Party.  During the war he had met and married Dorothea Marshall in Bristol about December 1941 and their son David was born there about June 1947.  They later moved to the village of Sodbury in Gloucestershire where their second son Philip was born about March 1950.

 

 

Harding, Eileen                                                                                                         6, 23, 53

Sister of Edgar and Gilbert, she was born in Bristol about March 1921.  Like Edgar, she was a former Sunday School Teacher and was called up by the WAAF about March 1940. She later married Ken Nethercott (see below) in Bristol about July 1941 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  She was demobilised about July 1945, just as her husband came back home on leave after several years service overseas.

 

Harding, Gilbert                                                                                                                 17

Brother of Edgar and Eileen he was born in Bristol about December 1922.  During the Second World War he served with the Royal Navy and according to the Hall Mark had just returned home in September 1942 after serving on the same convoy (Operation Pedestal) that saw Wallace Chamberlain survive the sinking of HMS Eagle – see above.  He lived in Ashley Down before the war and was also a member of the Bible Class.  After the war he met and married Beryl Nash in Bristol about December 1946 and moved to Abingdon in Oxfordshire where their daughter Linda was born about March 1947.

 

Hares, the Rev W H                                                                                                            30

He was the Padre in Ronald Hawker’s Regiment in Risalpur (India) in September 1943 (see below).   It turned out that he knew the Rev Hall very well and had been camping with him at Brean Down, where he the boys had christened him “Cowboy”.

 

Harrison, Bob                                                                                                               41, 56

Bob was born in Bristol about March 1920 to Thomas and Celia Harrison (nee Cole), who had married there about March 1917.  During the inter-war years they lived at Mervyn Road in Bishopston.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and Bob later became a keen member of the Bible Class.  During the war he met and married Irene Owens-Britton in Bristol about March 1942.  Shortly after this he was called up by the Army and was serving in France in September 1944.  He was back home on leave in November 1945, having served in Germany with the BAOR.  His daughter Judith was later born in Bristol in about March 1946.

 

Hart, Betty                                                                                                                     32, 54

Joan Elizabeth Hart (otherwise known as Betty) was born in Cheltenham about December 1925 to Howard and Annie Hart (nee Skirten), who had married in Tewkesbury the previous April.  The family later moved to Bishopston where her brothers Brian and Bernard were born about September 1932 and December 1934 respectively.  Her father was a baker and her mother ran the Post Office on Pigsty Hill, which Betty later took over when her mother retired.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Betty won the Richard’s Prize in about January 1944.  She later married Keith West (see below) in Bristol about February 1945 and their two children – Ian and Linda – were born there about December 1947 and December 1949 respectively.

 

Hart, Eileen                                                                                                                   46, 60

Eileen was born in Bristol about September 1926 to John and Elsie Hart (nee Fox), who had married there in about September 1917.  Her brother Peter (see below) was also born in Bristol about September 1924.  According to the Hall Mark, she was called up by the Women’s Services about February 1945 and by March 1946 had been added to the list of those who had been demobilised since V E Day.  After the war she met and married Peter Parson in East Elloes in Lincolnshire in about September 1948 and had 2 boys – Michael & Kevin – born about December 1949 and December 1956 respectively.

 

Hart, Peter                                                                                                              22, 34, 60

Brother of Eileen (see above), he was born in Bristol about September 1924.  According to the Hall Mark, he was called up about January 1943 and posted to India about January 1944.  He was still there (at Cawnpore) by November 1946 and seems to have been particularly impressed by the keenness of those Indians who had become recent converts to Christianity.  After the war he became a prominent member of St Michael & All Angels Church and later took over the Post Office on Pigsty Hill from Betty Hart.  He does not appear to have married nor had any children.

 

Hartland, Robert                                                                                                           25, 45

Known by his second name, Victor Robert Harland was born in Bristol about June 1924, the eldest son of William and Elizabeth Hartland (nee Smith) who had married there about December 1918.  His younger brother Roy (see below) was also born in Bristol in about March 1928, as were his sisters Edna, Hilda and Doreen in about September 1920, March 1922 and September 1925 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Robert was called up about March 1943 and was serving in North Africa by February 1945.  After the war he met and married Joan Scott in Bristol about March 1921 and their sons David and Michael were born there about June 1957 and December 1959 respectively.

 

Hartland, Roy                                                                                                                     57

Brother of Robert (see above), Roy was born in Bristol about March 1928, the youngest child of William and Elizabeth Hartland (nee Smith).  The family lived in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Roy later became a member of the Bible Class.  According to the Hall Mark, he also became a Sunday School Teacher in about November 1945.  He later moved to the Kingswood area of Bristol where he met and married Jill French about December 1966 and had 2 children – Geoffrey and Julie – born in about March 1968 and December 1969 respectively.

 

Harvey, Ian                                                                                       6, 19, 20, 25, 29, 38. 60

Ian was born in Bristol about December 1920, the only son of Herbert and Nora Harvey (nee Kerr) who had married there about March 1919.  They lived in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church where Ian later became a Sunday School Teacher and member of the Bible Class.  According to the Hall Mark he had been called up by the RAF by March 1940 (wrongly recorded by the Rev Hall as the Army) and was under going pilot training in Canada by September 1942.  He had returned home with a Commission by January 1943 and married Bettina Lamb in Cheltenham about March that year.  By September he was serving with Bomber Command and had made his name in the newspapers over an incident in which he ended up flying his Lancaster upside down while on a bombing mission over the Ruhr.  He had completed his tour of duty by March 1944, earning a DFC in the process, and was serving as an Instructor.  By March 1946 he had been included in the list of those who had been demobilized since V E Day.  He and his wife settled in Cheltenham after the war and their son Malcolm was born there about March 1948.

 

Harvey, Marwood                                                                                                               57

Marwood was born in Bristol about December 1922, the only son of Harry and Annie Harvey (nee Brown) who had married there about September 1921.  His sister Olive was also born in Bristol about January 1922.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the RAF about November 1945.  He does not appear to have married nor had any children.

 

Hayward, Alan                                                                                                              34, 45

Although I have not been able to trace his early family history, the Hall Mark records that Alan was called up by the Army about January 1944 and was serving in Germany with the BLA in February 1945.  After the war he met and married Patricia Smith in Weston-Super-Mare about September 1951 and their two daughters – Tracey and Julie – were born in Bristol about December 1963 and March 1965 respectively.

 

Hayward, Ronald                                                                                                                45

Although I have not been able to trace Ronald’s family history, the Hall Mark suggests that he was the brother of Alan and notes that he was also serving with the BLA in Germany in February 1945.

 

Hawker, Ronald                                                                                                19, 25, 30, 56

Ronald was born in Bristol about December 1921, to Albert and Ada Hawker (nee Fowler) who had married there about September 1917.  His older brother Harold was also born in Bristol about September 1918 and his younger brother Clifford followed somewhat later in about September 1929.  According to the Hall Mark, Ronald was serving with the Army in the Middle East in September 1942 and was in India by March 1943, where he remained for the rest of the war.  He was based in Risalpur in September 1943 where he was persuaded to join a choir run by the Padre (the Rev Hares – see above) who, as it turned out, knew the Rev Hall very well.  He had been camping with him at Brean Down in the old days, where the boys had christened him “Cowboy”.  Ronald had returned home together with Leslie Beavis (see above) by November 1945.  After the war he moved to the New Forest where he met and married Betty Hillyar about July 1952 and they had 3 boys – Royston, Paul and Wayne – born about March 1956, September 1962 and December 1964 respectively and 2 girls – Sharron and Dawn – born about March 1957 and December 1959.

 

Hawkins, Keith                                                                                                                    53

I have not been able to trace his early family history but the birth records show that he was born in Bristol about June 1921, and that his mother’s maiden name was also Hawkins which suggests that he was illegitimate.  According to the Hall Mark he had been called up by the RAF by July 1945 but he does not appear to have married after the war.

 

 

Hellings, Sidney (“Olly”)                                                                       6, 20, 41, 53, 54, 61

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that “Olly” was born in Bristol about June 1918 and that his mother’s maiden name was Martin.  The family settled in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where “Olly” later became a chorister and member of the Bible Class.  After leaving school he joined the Royal Ordnance Survey Corps at Chatham in about July 1936.  The Hall Mark notes that was serving with the Army by March 1940 and had earned a commission by January 1943.  He had also grown a mustache and lost a wrestling match with the Rev Hall about this time.  By September 1944 he was serving in France and by July 1945 he was back home on embarkation leave, having earned a Croix de Guerre with Silver Star.  He had also taken the opportunity to marry Pamela Davidson-Pratt in Ampthill in Bedfordshire about this time as well.   They later moved to the Woolwich area of London where their daughter Susan was born about March 1956.

 

Hemmings, Lewis                                                                                              18, 22, 38, 41

He was born in Bristol about June 1921 to Frederick George and Elsie M Hemmings (nee Pain) who had married there in June 1917.  They were living at 19 Ashgrove Avenue (off Ashley Down Road) in the Horfield area of Bristol at this time.  His older brother Roy (see below) was born about March 1919 and his younger brothers Alan and John followed in about May 1924 and December 1929 respectively.  His father was a carpenter’s laborer and served briefly with the 2/6th Gloucestershire Regiment and the Labour Corps (Southern Command) during the First World War but was discharged on both occasions due to disability caused by a middle ear infection.  Unfortunately his brother and Lewis’ uncle (another Roy Hemmings) was killed on the 28th of September 1916 during the battle of the Somme – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1914- 18) for further details.  The family remained in the Horfield area during the inter-war years and continued to attend at St Michael & All Angels Church.  Like his older brother, Lewis was called up by the Royal Navy in about February 1942 and in March 1944 was serving on a tank landing craft.  By September 1944 he had been earned an MID for his work in the Mediterranean.  He had married Winifred West about December 1942 and their daughter Ruth was born in about June 1947, followed by son Paul in March 1949.

 

Hemmings, Roy                                                                                                 18, 38, 41, 57

Older brother of Lewis (see above), he was also called up by the Royal Navy and was serving in a destroyer by September 1942.  By March 1944 he had switched to submarines and had been awarded the DSM by the following September.  By November 1945 he had been demobilised and been to Buckingham Palace to receive his medal.  He had married Joan Taylor in Bristol in about September 1941 and their daughter Barbara was born in Cirencester about June 1944.  After the war they returned to Bristol and two more daughters – Mary and Susan – were born in December 1945 and June 1954 respectively.

 

Herbert, the Rev T D                                                                                                           19

He was serving as a Padre in the Middle East in September 1942.

 

 

Hill, Claude                                                                                                                   29, 60

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Claude was born in Bristol about March 1924 and that his mother’s maiden name was Skuse.  He also had an older brother Stanley, who had been born in Bristol about September 1919.  According to the Hall Mark, Claude was called up by the Army about September 1943 and had been posted to India by March 1946 where he met Peter Stirratt.  After the war he met and married Joan Beardsley in Sudbury in Suffolk about December 1950 and their two daughters – Patricia and Jacqueline – were born in Bristol about June 1952 and June 1955 respectively.

 

Hill, Ian                                                                                                             15, 19, 34, 52

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace Ian’s family history other than to determine that he was the son of the Governor of Horfield Prison.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving as a 2nd Lieutenant with the Army in the Far East in March 1942.  He avoided capture by the Japanese and was serving in the Middle East by September.  By January 1944 he had been promoted to the rank of Captain and by July 1945 he was back home on leave.

 

Hill, Leonard                                                                                                                       22

Leonard was born in Bristol about March 1926 to Leonard and Minnie Hill (nee Short), who had married there about September 1919.  His sisters Margaret and Violet were also born in Bristol about June 1921 and June 1924 respectively.  The family lived in Bishop Road in Bishopston before the war and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  Leonard was a member of the 61st Bristol Scout Troop and later assisted Frank Blacklock in running it in January 1943.  He was also a keen sportsman and played full back for Bristol City Rugby Club.  After the war he met and married Betty Bartlett in Bristol about September 1950 and they had 4 children – Robert, Valerie, David and Adrian – who were born about December 1952, June 1955, September 1957 and December 1959 respectively.

 

Hill, Meric                                                                                                                           53

Meric was born in Bristol about September 1921 to William and Hilda Hill (nee Drewett), who had married there about December 1918.  He was a member of a large family with 10 brothers and sisters – the eldest was Margaret who was born in Bristol about March 1920.  Then came Meric followed by Keith, Noel. Sylvia, Mavis, Janice and Kenneth who were born in September 1923, March 1926, June 1928, June 1931, June 1936 and December 1937 respectively, followed by the triplets Gilian, John and Roger in June 1939.  According to the Hall Mark, Meric did not see any of the fighting in the Second World War but was eventually called up by the RAF in about July 1945.  Shortly before he was called up he met and married Kathleen Gibbs in Bristol about April 1945 and their 3 children – David, Edward and Linda – were born there about June 1953, June 1955 and December 1964 respectively.

 

Hillier, Arthur                                                                                                                     45

I have not been able to trace Arthur’s early family history but according to the Hall Mark, he was serving in a Tank Regiment with the 8th Army near Ravenna in Northern Italy in February 1945.  After the war he met and married Frances Saunders in Bristol about October 1949 and their eldest son Francis was born there the following December.  They had four other children – Dennis who was also born in Bristol about March 1952, followed by Richard, Rosemary and Dawn who were born about June 1953, September 1955 and September 1962 respectively.

 

Hodges, Richard                                                                                                                 61

Richard was born in Bristol about March 1928 to Donald and Gladys Hodges (nee Hodder), who had married there about June 1923.  His sister Sylvia had also been born in Bristol about September 1925.  His father had served on the Western Front with the Essex Regiment during the last 2 years of the First World War and settled in the Bishopston area of Bristol during the inter war years.  Richard was too young to see service during the Second World War but the Hall Mark records that he had been called up by the RAF by March 1946.  After completing his National Service he returned to Bristol where he met and married Patricia Bond in about June 1949. Their daughter Sally-Anne was born there about September 1951, followed by Robert and Christopher in about June 1954 and September 1955 respectively.  Some time after this the family moved to Plymouth where the twins Jeremy and Michael were born about March 1962.

 

Holbrook, Robert                                                                                              43, 52

Bob was born in Bristol about December 1924 the youngest son of Albert and Elizabeth Holbrook (nee Connell), who had married there about December 1916.  His eldest sister Edna and her twin Rosina were also born in Bristol about March 1917 followed by his older brother William in about June 1920.  According to the Hall Mark, Robert was called up by the Army some time after Easter 1944 and was on his way to the Far East by July 1945, following a period at home on embarkation leave.  He later met and married Joan Sargent in Bristol about December 1952 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Holcombe, Fred                                                                                                22, 25, 41, 60

Frederick William Holcombe was born in Bristol about September 1912 to Frederick William and Edith Holcombe (nee Veale), who had married there about September 1903.  In 1901 his father was working as a coachman for the Blaise Estate and he was living as a boarder in one of the estate houses at 8 Rockleaze Road in Westbury on Trym near Bristol.  By 1911 his parents were living at 77 Alma Vale Road in Clifton, together with his sisters Gladys, Edith and Kathleen.  His father was working as the caretaker of the local Parish Hall at this time.  He later served with the Royal Field Artillery from about 1917, although he never went overseas.  In 1939 Fred met and married Norah Hanham in Bristol about September 1939 and settled in the Bishopston area.  According to the Hall Mark, Fred was called up by the Army quite early on during the Second World War and had been posted overseas by January 1943.  He was serving in India the following March and by September 1944 he was fighting with the 14th Army in Burma.  By March 1946 had been added to the list of those who had been demobilised since VE Day. After the war his daughter Virginia was born in Bristol about March 1948 but I have not been able to trace any other children from this marriage.

 

Holmes, Roy                                                                                                                  46, 56

Roy was born in Bristol about June 1926 to Stanley and Kathleen Holmes (nee Coates), who had married there about March 1921.  I have not been able to trace any other children from this marriage.  According to the Hall Mark, Roy was called up by the Army some time after September 1944 and was serving in India by November 1945.  He does not seem to have married on his return from service overseas.

 

Holmes, Walter                                                                                                                   40

Walter was born in Bristol about December 1920 to Walter and Lily Holmes (nee Langridge), who had married in Brighton about March 1915.  His older brother Gerald was born in Lewes in Sussex about June 1919.  After this the family settled in Bishopston and Walter later became a keen member of the 61st Bristol Scout Troop.  According to the Hall Mark, he was called up by the Army during the middle years of the war and later took part in the D Day invasion of Normandy.  He was back home by September 1944, however, after being wounded in the fighting in France.  He does not appear to have married after the war.

 

Holt, Kenneth (“Blondie”)                                                                                            17, 28

Another scout, he was killed in a flying accident in Canada on the 28th of April 1942 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Home Guard                                                                                                             9, 14, 46

This was a volunteer militia called up to defend the country in the event of invasion.  They were made up mostly of older men with previous military experience – hence the nickname “Dad’s Army.   They took over various tasks from the Regular and Territorial Units in the local area, including anti aircraft and searchlight duties, thereby freeing them for service overseas.  The Bristol Home Guard unit (the 9th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment) included several members from the Church and Bible Class, although fortunately none of these were included amongst those killed or injured during the Bristol Blitz.   They took over the Parish Halls in about September 1940 and left about February 1945.

 

Hooper, Derek                                                                                                                                17

Derek was born in Bristol about September 1915 to Ethelbert George and Ethel Daisy Hooper (nee Bragg), who had married there in about September 1906.    In 1911 his parents were living at 25 Upper Belmont Road in Bishopston, together with eldest sister Barbara who was born in about March 1910.  His other sister Audrey was also born in Bristol about June 1913.  His father was running his own lithographic printing business at this time.  According to the Hall Mark, Derek joined up quite early in the Second World War and in September 1942 had just returned home after serving for 2 years in Sierra Leone in West Africa.  He does not appear to have married after the war had ended.

 

Hoppins, Miss A                                                                                                                  22

Alice Lily Hoppins was born in Newton Abbott about March 1905 to William and Elizabeth Hoppins.  In 1901 Her parents were living in Frog Street in Trull in Somerset with her older sisters Beatrice and Lily, while her eldest sister Emily was working in domestic service for Richard Shrapnel and his wife – a retired Grocer living at 94 Gloucester Road in Bishopston – and was still there in 1911.  Her father was working as a saddler/farrier at this time.  By 1911 her mother had died and her widowed father was working as a labourer on a farm at St Annes on Alderney in the Channel Islands.  Alice seems to have moved to live with her eldest sister in Bishopston about this time and remained there for the rest of her life.  During the Second World War she was called up for service with the ATS by about January 1943 and after the war she met and married Leslie Byer in Bristol about September 1945.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Horlick. John                                                                                                    33, 34, 41, 46

Brother of Mary (see below), John was born in Birmingham about March 1924 to Cecil and Gwendoline Horlick, who had married in Hammersmith in London about September 1920.  His father enlisted with the 2/6th Gloucestershire Regiment during the First World War and would have seen action at the battle of Fromelles before transferring to the Tank Regiment for the battles at Cambrai and Amiens in the later years of the war.  Before moving to Birmingham John’s parents initially moved to Gloucester, where his older sister Mary was born about December 1921.  However a few years later they had moved to Bristol, where his younger sister Elisabeth was born about June 1927.  The family settled in the Bishopston area, where John joined the 61st Bristol Scout Group.  According to the Hall Mark, he managed the Scout Troop for a while before being called up by the Army in about January 1944.  He was serving with the Royal Engineers in France by September 1944 and was on home leave in February 1945, having previously spent the last few months building bridges in Holland.  After the war he met and married Doreen Weaver in Bristol about September 1949 and their first 2 children – David and Sarah – were born there about December 1950 and March 1953 respectively.  After this the family moved to Sodbury in Gloucestershire where their second daughter Alison was born about June 1954.

 

Horlick, Mary                                                                                                                23, 35

Sister of John (see above), Mary was born in Gloucester about December 1921.  During the war she was called up by the WAAF in January 1943 and later married her boyfriend Norman White in Bristol the following December.  Their only child Christine was later born in Bristol about March 1945.

 

 

House, Christopher                                                                                                             19

Christopher was born in Brecknock about December 1919 to Henry and Florence House (nee Jordan), who had married in Bristol about March 1915.  His older brother Leslie was born in the West Derby district of Liverpool about March 1916 while his father was serving with the Reserve Battalion of the South Wales Borderers, which was based in Liverpool at that time.  His father was later posted to the 2/1 Brecknockshires – a Territorial Battalion of the South Wales Borderers – which was eventually absorbed into the 2/7th Royal Welsh Fusiliers in November 1916.  He eventually went to France in late 1917 where he saw action at 3rd Ypres, the Spring Offensive and the Advance to the Selle and rose to the rank of Warrant Officer.  During the inter war years the family returned to settle in the Bishopston area of Bristol.  According to the Hall Mark, Christopher was called up quite early during the Second World War and was serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  He had married Doris Ogbourne in Bristol about July 1939 and their daughter Maureen was born there the following March.  After the war his eldest son Michael was born in Bristol about September 1945 and his other son Alan followed in about June 1947.

 

Huckle, Reg                                                                                                             43, 52, 56

Reg was born in Bristol about September 1926 to Reginald and Mabel Huckle (nee Slingo), who had married there in about September 1912.  He had an older brother Len (born about September 1913), who was confirmed at St Michael & All Angels Church on the 31st March 1931 according to a newsletter published in the May of that year.  His sister Alice was born about June 1915.  Reg also attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and was a keen member of the Bible Class.  He was called up by the Army some time after Easter 1944 and was erroneously reported to be on his way to the Far East by July 1945, but was serving in the Shetland Islands the following November.    He later married Margaret Baker in about June 1950 – see above – and their sons Richard and Peter were born about March 1954 and September 1956 respectively.

 

Hull, Ken                                                                                   15, 17, 22, 25, 33, 46, 53, 58

Ken was born in Bristol about September 1924 to Maurice and Florence Hull (nee Hallworth), who had married in Stokesby in North Yorkshire about June 1921.  His younger brother Derek was also born in Bristol about June 1931.  His father was conscripted by the Army in 1917 and later served in France with the Royal Garrison Artillery.  The family settled in the Bishopston area of Bristol during the inter war years and Ken later joined the local 61st Bristol Scout Group.  In March 1942 the Hall Mark noted that he had just been awarded his Golden Cord and Bushman’s thong.  He later took over leadership of the Scout Troop for a while in September when Ken Fisher and Jeff Carpenter were called up, but had himself been called up by the Royal Navy by January 1943.  By March 1944 he had been awarded the Richards Prize and was back at Christmas to read the lesson for the Carol Service.  By July 1945 he was a Sub Lieutenant in the FAA and by November had become engaged to Lilian Lewington who was serving in the WRNS.  They later settled down in Rochford in Essex, where they married in about December 1946 and had 5 children – Jeff, Christine, James, Andrew and Robert who were born about September 1947, December 1948, December 1951, December 1957 and March 1962 respectively.

 

Hunt, Eileen                                                                                                                  23, 38

Sister of Norman (see below), she was born in Bristol about June 1921 to Sidney and Ethel Hunt (nee Wright), who had married there in about September 1913.  Norman was the eldest having been born in Bristol about December 1915 followed by Evaline, Mary and Muriel who were born about September 1917, September 1924 and September 1926 respectively.  Her father served in France with the Royal Field Artillery and Royal Garrison Artillery during the First World War.  The family settled in Bishopston between the wars and Eileen was called up by the WAAF about January 1943. She later became engaged to Thomas McGee and they married in Bristol about March 1944 (although the Rev Hall erroneously lists her as a member of the ATS at this time).  Their son Peter was born in Bristol about December 1946 and after this the family moved to Liverpool, where their daughter Pamela was born about December 1950.

 

Hunt, Norman                                                                                                         38, 41, 60

Brother of Eileen (see above), he was born in Bristol about December 1915.  He was called up by the Army during the Second World and was serving as a sergeant in the Army Fire Service by March 1944.  He was with the BLA in France by the following September and by March 1946 was listed amongst those who had been demobilised since V E Day.  After the war he met and married Kathleen McMillan in Bristol about June 1948 and later moved to Bradford in Yorkshire, where his son David was born about March 1951.

 

Huxtable, “Eddie”                                                                                                        38, 57

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace “Eddie’s” family history but the Hall Mark notes that he had spent several years on Home Service with the Pioneer Corps by March 1944 and had been demobilised by November 1945.

 

I

Isles, Stephen                                                                                                                       61

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark notes that Stephen had been called up by the Army by March 1946.

 

J

Jackson, Charles                                                                                                                 43

Although I have not been able to trace his early family history, the Hall Mark records that Charles was called up by the RAF shortly after Easter 1944.  After the war he met and married Shiela Hibberd in Bristol about September 1948 and their daughter Heather was born there about December 1949.  Shortly after this the family moved to Yeovil in Somerset, where their son David was born about September 1951.

 

James, Dr John Angell                                                                                                        28

John was born in Stratford Upon Avon on the 21st of January 1864 to John Angell and Margaret Mary James (nee Burbury).  He had 3 brothers – Frederick (1866), Herbert (1867) and Robert (1869).  His father died in 1870 aged 50 when the boys were still quite young, leaving his mother to bring them up by herself.  John trained to be a Doctor of Medicine and later married Emily Connell Ashwin at Alveston in Warwickshire on the 9th of August 1893 at the age of 29.  They had 4 children Margaret (1895), Manley (1897), Kathleen (1899) and “Jack” (1901) and in 1901 they were living at the High Street in Odiham in Hampshire.  They lived in a large house, with a cook (Miriam Mills aged 19) and 2 domestic servants (Edith Hatchman and Margaret Harmsworth).  At some point after this they moved to Bristol and by 1914 they were living at Nevil Road in the Bishopston.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and John later became a close friend of the Rev Hall.   By 1939 he had moved again and was living at Dusk Elms Avenue in the Stoke Bishop area of Bristol.  During both World Wars his wife Emily organized a knitting circle of over 100 ladies who dedicated their time to providing scarves and jumpers for the troops in the trenches – reported in the Bristol Evening Post on the 29th of December 1939.  After a long and fruitful life John eventually died in Bristol in March 1953 aged 89.

 

James, John Angell (“Jack”)                                                                                              28

Jack was the younger brother of Manley James (see below) and youngest son of Dr Angell James (see above).  He was born in Harley Wintney in Hampshire about December 1901 but later moved to live in Nevil Road in the Bishopston area of Bristol.  He was educated at Bristol Grammar School and like his father trained to be a Doctor of Medicine, later becoming a “Throat Specialist”.   He does not appear to have married and according to the Hall Mark enlisted in the Army shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War.  In 1942 was serving as a Major in the RAMC in a General hospital with the British North African Forces.

 

James, Manley Angell                                                                                                   11, 28

Older brother of Jack and son of Dr Angell James (see above), Manley was born in Odiham in Hampshire on the 12th June 1896 and in 1901 he was living at the High Street in Odiham.  Some time after this they moved to Bristol and were living at Nevil Road in Bishopston when the First World War broke out in 1914.  Manley was educated at Bristol Grammar School and, like his father, was a member of the Bohemians Cricket Club.  He was also very keen on rugby and played for his school and Bristol Rugby Club.  After the War he played for Clifton Rugby Club and for the Nomads Cricket Club. – see Annex 4 to the Parish Roll of Honour (1914 – 1918) for a detailed account of his sporting and war time achievements.  He had a distinguished career with the Army – going to France in 1915 as a 2nd Lieutenant with the 8th Gloucesters, where he earned a VC & MC. After the war he continued his Army career, rising to the rank of Brigadier, seeing further war time service in Africa and Italy.  In 1928 he met and married Noreen Cooper in Bristol and their only son Peter was born there about December 1930.  He continued to attend at St Michael & All Angels’ Church and during the Second World War he corresponded regularly with the Rev Hall, who mentions him several times in the church newsletters published during those years.  During the war his family moved away from Bristol and in 1943 was living at 47 Bristol Road in Weston Super Mare, although after the war he returned to live at Westbury on Trym in the suburbs of Bristol.

 

He was commanding the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment in January 1939 and by March 1940 was GSO1 (1st Class) in the 54th Division.  He was promoted to BGS of VIII Corps in July 1940 and was later posted to command the 128th (Hampshire) Brigade in February 1941.  The Brigade remained on Home Service as part of the 43rd (Wessex) Division until the end of 1942 when it was transferred to the 46th (North Midland) Division and landed in Algiers on the 6th of January 1943.  His unit served throughout the Tunisian Campaign and Manley won the DSO for the way he handled his Brigade at the battle of Beja at the end of February – again see Annex 4 for details.    He next saw action at the hotly contested landings at Salerno in Italy where he was wounded on the 20th of September 1943.  After recovering from his wounds he returned home to take up the post of BGS (Training) Home Forces in July 1944 and in July 1945 was appointed to the command of 140th Brigade, which was preparing for service in the Far East.  The war ended before he could go overseas and in October he was appointed CRO of the Air HQ with the British Forces of Occupation in Germany, where he remained until 1948.  He was then appointed Director of Ground Defence at the Air Ministry, where he remained until he retired in 1951.  Thereafter he was employed as a Defense Officer by the Bristol Aeroplane Company until 1961.  He also served as Deputy Lieutenant General of Gloucestershire in 1957 and of Avon in 1974.  He died at home in Westbury on Trym on the 21st of September 1975 and was cremated at Canford Cemetery.

 

James, Roy                                                                                                                          28

He was killed in action when the aircraft carrier HMS Hermes was sunk by Japanese bombers on the 9th of April 1942 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45).

 

Jarman, Hazel                                                                                                               34, 43

Hazel was born in Bristol about September 1924 to Frederick and Emily Jarman (nee Clark), who had married there about September 1916.  She also had 4 brothers – Arthur, Howard, William and Raymond – who were born in Bristol about September 1919, December 1920, June 1929 and September 1930 respectively.  Her father was a Territorial Soldier who went to France with the 1/6 Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment and saw considerable action on the Somme and at 3rd Ypres before finishing the War in Italy at the end of October 1918 following the battle of Vittoria Venneto.  After the war the family settled in Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  During the Seond World War Hazel was called up by the Women’s Services about January 1944 but still found time to arrange for the Rev D B Hall to marry her to Walter Luckham (see below) the following September.  Their daughters Jacqueline and Anita were later born in Bristol about March 1948 and December 1950 respectively.

 

Jarvis, Mervyn                                                                                                                     45

Mervyn was born in Bristol about December 1924 the second son of Reginald and Florence Jarvis (nee Moore), who had married there in about December 1919.  His older brother Raymond was also born in Bristol about September 1920 and his younger brother David followed in about September 1929.  He was called up about the end of 1942 and, according to the Hall Mark, was serving with the BLA in Germany by February 1945.  He does not appear to have married after the war ended.

 

Jeffries, Dennis                                                                                                  19, 45, 46, 62

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was serving with the RAF in the Middle East in September 1942 and had been posted to India (following promotion to the rank of Pilot Officer) by February 1945.  He also married in India about this time and their first child (a daughter) had been born by March 1946.

 

Joscelene, Dr                                                                                                                      33

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark notes that he had just returned from service in the Middle East by January 1944.

 

 

Jolly, John                                                                                                               30, 34, 42

John was born in Bristol about December 1923 to Frederick and Lillian Jolly (nee Brough), who had married there about March 1920.  During the inter war years the family lived in Gloucester Road in Bishopston, where his father worked as a Dentist.  John was a keen cricketer and played for the Optimists Cricket Club during the war.  According to the Hall Mark, he was called up by the RAF about 1942 and was playing in an RAF band in Freetown in Sierra Leone (West Africa) by September 1943.  He later met up with Lionel Dennis in Freetown the following March and was due to return home on leave by September 1944.   After the war he met and married Margaret Holloway in Bristol about September 1949 and their daughter Catherine was born there about June 1952.

 

Jones, Arthur                                                                                                                       43

Arthur was born in Bristol about June 1924 to William and Elsie Jones (nee Small), who had married there about March 1917.  His brothers Ernest, Albert and Kenneth were also born in Bristol about December 1919, December 1921 and September 1934 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Arthur was called up by the Royal Navy shortly after Easter 1944.  It seems likely that he left Bristol after the war but I have not been able to determine whether he subsequently married or had any children.

 

Jones, Dorothy                                                                                                              22, 54

Dorothy was born in Bristol about March 1921 to Ernest and Emily Jones (nee Griffiths), who had married there about April 1920.  Her sister Millicent was also born in Bristol about December 1928, followed by her brothers Sidney and Robert in about December 1930 and December 1932 respectively. According to the Hall Mark, Dorothy had been called up by the ATS by January 1943 and later married Alf Wallis (see below) in about June 1945.  Their daughter Linda was also born in Bristol about March 1952.

 

Jones, Graham                                                                                                                    18

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Graham was born in Long Ashton about September 1924 and that his mother’s maiden name was Lee.  After this the family moved to Bishopston where his sister Doris was born in about September 1927, followed by Sybil, Brian, David and Valerie in about June 1929, September 1930, March 1937 and June 1939 respectively.  Graham later joined the Merchant Navy and according to the Hall Mark was serving at sea in September 1942.  After the war he later met and married Sonia Cramer in Surry about June 1962 and settled in the Lambeth area of London, where his daughter Caroline was born about June 1963.

 

Jones, Harold                                                                                                            6, 12, 28

Apopular scout, he was one of 4 crew members killed when the SS Prince Rupert City (Bideford) was sunk by a German bomber, while sailing in convoy from Halifax (Canada) on the 2nd of June 1941 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45).

 

Jones, Jimmie                                                                                                                  8, 33

Jimmie and his twin brother Alfred were born in Bristol about June 1921 to George and Florence Jones (nee Sims), who had married there about December 1916.  His older sister Gertrude was also born in Bristol about September 1919, followed Stanley and Clifford in about September 1920 and June 1923 respectively.  The family lived at Melbourne Road in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & all Angels Church. Jimmie enlisted in the Army shortly after war broke out and went to France with the BEF in 1940.  He was later listed as missing following the evacuation from Dunkirk in June 1940 but was subsequently reported to be in a POW camp in Germany, and was eventually repatriated in about January 1944.  After the war he met and married Rosina Jones in Bristol about March 1950 and their daughter Andrea was born the following December.

 

Jones, Maldwyn                                                                                                                  34

Maldwyn was born in Stockport in Cheshire about March 1923 to Alfred and Kezia Jones (nee Jones), who had married in Birkenhead about March 1913.  His brother John was also born in the Birkenhead area about December 1918.  At some point during the inter war years the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Maldwyn joined the RAF during the early years of the Second World War and was serving in India with the rank of sergeant by January 1944, where he helped to set up a West Country Society in Calcutta.  After the war he met and married Marianne Weisz in Bristol about March 1946 and later moved to Cirencester, where their son Clive was born about March 1951.

 

Jones, Reginald                                                                                           19, 38, 52, 54, 58

Reginald was born in Bristol about June 1917 to Frederick and Sarah Jones (nee Parsons), who had married in Woolstanton in Staffordshire about September 1916.  His sisters Ellen and Phyllis were also born in Bristol about September 1918 and June 1920 respectively and his brothers Denis and Donald followed in about March 1923 and March 1925.  Reginald was called up shortly after the Second World War broke out and was serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  He later transferred to Mombassa in Kenya (East Africa) about January 1943, where he remained until the end of the war.  He was demobilised and back home by July 1945, where according to the Rev Hall he quickly drifted into matrimony and married Nansi Lewis the following November.  Their daughter Lynne was born in Bristol about June 1956.

 

Judd, Mr A P                                                                                                                       42

Arthur Percy Judd was born in Bristol about June 1877 to Ernest and Mary Judd and in 1901 they were living at 121 Cotham Brow in Clifton, together with his sister Elsie and brother Wilfred.  At this time Arthur was working as an assistant to his father who ran an Ironmonger’s shop nearby.  He later married Rose Helena Cannon in Thornbury about June 1901 and their son Edwin Kenneth was born in Bristol about June 1907.  His mother died in Bristol about December 1911 aged 59 but his father and sister continued to live at 121 Cotham Brow, while Arthur helped his father run his ironmongery business. His father eventually died in Bathavon about September 1936 aged 82.

 

In 1911 Arthur and his family were living at 10 Cricklade Road in Bishopston from where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and Arthur later became Treasurer of the Social Club.  They also had a domestic servant – Phoebe Gay aged 17 – living in residence, while Rose’s brother – Charles Cannon aged 25 – was boarding with them at this time and earning his living as an assistant tailor.  Also boarding with them was George Lamming (aged 24) who was assisting Arthur and his father at their ironmonger’s shop.  He later served with the Gloucestershire Regiment and the Labour corps during the later years of the First World Wart.  After the war he continued to serve at St Michael & all Angels Church for many years and, according to the Hall Mark, he later recommended the Rev Martin Eltis to the Rev Hall as a potential replacement for the Rev T Bland in September 1944.

K

Kavanagh, Craftsman                                                                                                         35

According to the Hall Mark he presented a cup to the Canteen in about January 1944, from which he and Craftsman Robinson of the REME drank their 1,000th cup of tea.

 

Keeping, Jack                                                                                        19, 34, 45, 52, 54, 60 Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Leslie John Keeping was born in Bristol about September 1917 and that his mother’s maiden name was Slingo, and therefore possibly related to Reg Huckle (see above).  At some point during the inter war years the family moved to Beauchamp Road in Bishopston from where Jack helped to run the family’s dairy business.  He was called up quite early during the war and was serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  He had met up with Reg Webb on a rugby pitch in Alexandria (Egypt) by January 1944 and by February 1945 had also met Leslie Boulter at Aden (in the Yemen).  He was back at home in Bristol by the spring and had married Betty Oliver there by June 1945.  They later moved to Bathavon in Somerset where their children Susan and Jonathon were born in September 1949 and September 1952 respectively.

 

Kendall, Eileen                                                                                                              25, 56

Eileen was born in Birkenhead in Cheshire about September 1925 to Charles and Annie Kendall (nee Richardson), who had married there about September 1915.  Her brother Thomas was also born there about March 1919, as was her sister Mabel in about June 1921.  Some time after this the family moved to Bristol and was living in North Road in St Andrews before the war.  They attended at St Michael & All Angels Church where Eileen won the Richard’s Prize in March 1943.  She was called up shortly after this and was serving with the WRNS at Scapa Flow by November 1945, where she was reported to be “hob-nobbing” with several Admirals of the Fleet.   After the war she eventually married Edward Bradley in Kingswood about September 1967 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Kendall, Michael                                                                                               37, 43, 53, 56

Michael was born in Bristol about June 1926 the youngest son of Frederick and Laura Kendall, who had married there about June 1915.  His eldest brother Ralph was also born there in about September 1916 and was followed by his sister Margaret in June 1921 and his brother Howard in June 1924.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church where Michael later became a member of the Bible Class and took part in the lively debates mentioned in the edition of the Hall Mark published in March 1944.  He was called up by the RAF shortly after Easter 1944 and by July 1945 was serving as a sergeant meteorologist, taking regular flights to monitor developments in the weather.   By November he had been posted to Gibraltar where he continued to carry out these duties.  After the war he met and married Dorothy Nash in Wood Green in Middlesex and settled down in the Hackney area of London, where their children Trevor and Deborah were born in about March 1951 and March 1952 respectively.

 

Kendall, Muriel                                                                                                                   26

I have been unable to trace Muriel’s family history but according to the Hall Mark she was called up by the ATS about March 1943.

 

Knight, Reginald Lesley                                                                                                  6, 40

Reginald was born in Bristol about September 1908 to Walter John and Mary Ellen Knight (nee Lake), who had married there in about March 1899.  In 1911 they were living at 30 Trinity Street in the Newtown area of Bristol, together with his brother Cecil (aged 9) and sisters Muriel (7) and Violet (4).  Both his parents were working as insurance agents at this time.  He later met and married Lily May Vowles about September 1934 and they settled in Bishopston.  They attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Reginald later became one of the Sunday School Teachers.   According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the Army in France by March 1940 and, after being safely evacuated from Dunkirk, remained on Home Service until his unit went back to France in June 1944.  By September 1944 he was back home having been wounded while serving with the Guards Armoured Division in the battle for Normandy.  Fortunately he made a full recovery and their daughter Leslie was born about June 1945.

 

Knuckey, Joan                                                                                                               29, 42

Although I have not been able to trace her father, the records show that Joan was born in Bristol about September 1921, the only daughter of Florence Knuckey (nee Nott) who had married in Swindon about June 1914.  Her younger brother Tom was also born in Bristol about September 1924 – see below.  Her family lived in Surrey Road in Bishopston before the war and attended at St Michael &All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark she was called up by the WAAF shortly after Easter 1943 and helped with some of the weather forecasting for D Day the following year.  By September 1944 she was one of only two commissioned officers from this Parish serving with the Women’s Service (the other being Mrs Barbara Price (nee Milburn) of the ATS – see below).  After the war she met and married Francis Nicholas in Bristol about December 1946 and moved to Oswestry where their daughter Jane was born about September 1947.  They then moved to Cheshire where their son Francis was born about June 1949.

 

Knuckey, Tom                                                                                                               45, 53

Brother of Joan (see above), he was born in Bristol about September 1924.  According to the Hall Mark he had been at home on convalescence leave at the end of 1944, after being slightly wounded while serving with the BLA in France.   However, he was back with his unit in Germany by February 1945 and had been demobilised by the following July.  After the war he moved to Derbyshire where he met and married Christien Mellor in Shardlow about September 1952.  They then settled in Derby where their children Timothy and Jenny were born in March 1955 and March 1958 respectively.

 

L

Lamble, Dora                                                                                                          25, 34, 57

Dora was born in Bristol about March 1924 to John and Nellie Lamble (nee Hoskin), who had married in Camelford in Cornwall about September 1921.  Her eldest brother Horace was also born in Bristol about June 1922 and after her came John (see below) and William in December 1925 and March 1932 respectively.  The family lived in Monmouth Road before the war and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Dora helped to run the Brownies during the war and was a winner of the Richard’s Prize in about March 1943.  She was called up by the Women’s Services about January 1944 and by November 1945 had been added to the list of those who had been demobilised since V E Day.  After the war she helped to run the Girl’s Club with Peggy Lye (see below) for many years but does not seem to have married.

 

Lamble, John                                                                                                                    34

Brother of Dora (see above), Jack was born in Bristol about December 1925 and according to the Hall Mark was called up by the Royal Navy about January 1944.  After the war he met and married Jean Light in about December 1949 and for a while they lived at Downend Road in Horfield.  They later moved to Kingswood where their twins Ann and Philip were born about December 1960.

 

Lane, Gordon                                                                                                                      57

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Gordon was born in Bristol about September 1926 and that his mother’s maiden name was Ludwell.  According to the Hall Mark, he was a member of the Bible Class and became a Sunday School Teacher about November 1945.  After the war he met and married Barbara Davey in Bristol about June 1949 and their daughters Jennifer and Katherine were born there about September 1952 and June 1957 respectively.

 

Lanham, Jack                                                                                                            6, 38, 45

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace Jack’s family history but according to the Hall Mark he was a former Sunday School Teacher and member of the Bible Class, who lived in Morley Square before the war.  He was serving as a corporal with the Royal Artillery in March 1940 and was still on Home Service by March 1944.  However, he was serving in Germany with the BLA by February 1945.

 

Lasbrey, Bishop                                                                                                                  61

A well known character from Isle of Wight camping days, he had recently returned from Lagos in Nigeria by March 1946 and agreed to take the confirmation service in place of the Bishop of Bristol, who had departed to Gloucester.

 

Laurence, Cec                                                                                                   19, 31, 33, 62

Cecil and his twin sister Kathleen were born in Bristol to Richard and Beatrice Laurence (nee Davis) in about March 1920.  According to the Hall Mark, Cec was serving with the Royal Navy in the Middle East in September 1942 and by September of the following year was reported to have become engaged to “a dark maiden” from Armenia.  By January 1944 he was back home handing out prizes at the Sunday School Party after 3 years service overseas.  After the war he married his fiancée Margery Tyler in Cleveden about April 1946 and they had 2 children – Elizabeth and Robert – born about September 1947 and December 1953 respectively.  He later worked for a wine importer in Queen’s Square and his son Rob Lawrence currently lives at 163 Longmead Avenue in Bishopston.

 

Lawler, Clissold                                                                                                                  41

Clissold and his twin brother Eric were born in Bristol about December 1911 to Frank Sidney and Florence Mary Lawler (nee Hicking), who had married there about September 1906.  Their eldest son Donald was also born in Bristol about June 1908.  In 1911 his parents were living at 374 Gloucester Road in Horfield, from where his mother worked as a milliner. His father was working as an Engine Pattern Maker at this time.  However by 1919 the family had moved to live at 257 Gloucester Road in Bishopston.  They also had an unemployed widow – Jemima Grabham aged 47 – lodging with them.

 

During the First World War his father enlisted in the Gloucestershire Regiment on the 16th October 1915 and was eventually posted to the 12th Battalion in France on the 16th of June 1916, just in time for the Somme Offensive.  After surviving 5 major battles in this offensive, including fighting with tanks for the first time at Flers Courcelette, he spent the rest of the year and the winter of 1917 in the trenches before being called on to take part in Arras Offensive at La Coulotte.  This was an attack by two Divisions on the line between the Vimy Lens Railway and Hill 65.  Unfortunately the wire was uncut and the attack failed with 10, 000 casualties including Frank, who received a gunshot wound to the head.  He spent 5 months in hospital before being classified as unfit for active service and was eventually discharged on the 19th of January 1919.

 

The family resumed its former pattern of life in Bishopston after the war and continued as normal until the Second World War broke out in September 1939.  Clissold was then called up by the Army and according to the Hall Mark was on Home Service with the Surrey Regiment in September 1944 but still found time to play for the dance orchestra which had originated in St Michael’s Parish Halls.  He does not appear to have married after the war but his brother Eric had married Eirlys Davies in Bristol about December 1941 and their son Nigel was born there about June 1955.

 

Lawton, Francis                                                                                                                  34

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history, but according to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Army and had been promoted to the rank of Captain by January 1944.

 

Lee, Nancy                                                                                                                          23

I have not been able to trace Nancy’s family history but according to the Hall Mark she was called up by the WAAF about January 1943.

 

Lewis, Alan                                                                                                                         18

Alan was born in Bristol about June 1921 the eldest son of Gwilym and Stella Lewis (nee Woodall), who had married in Merthyr Tydfil about March 1915.  His older sisters Betty and Dorothy were also born in Bristol about March 1916 and March 1919 respectively and his younger brother Colin was born there in about March 1928.  The family settled in Bishopston during the inter war years and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Alan was called up by the Royal Navy during the Second World War and was serving at sea by September 1942.  After the war he met and married Dorothy Jarrett in Birmingham about September 1946 but continued to live and work in Bristol, where his daughters Winifred and Mary were born about March 1948 and September 1951 respectively.

 

Lewis, David                                                                                                           29, 53, 60

Although I have not been able to trace his family history, the Hall Mark notes that he was the brother of Glyn Lewis (see below) and joined the RAF some time after Easter 1943.  After serving through the Burma Campaign he was in Ceylon with the South East Asia Command by July 1945.  By March 1946 he had broken his leg following a collision between 2 heavy trucks, shortly after returning from a meeting his brother and John Browne (see above) while on leave in India.

 

Lewis, Glyn                                                                                                             46, 52, 60

Brother of David (see above), he was called up by the Army some time after September 1944 and, after a period on embarkation leave, had departed for the Far East by July 1945.  By March 1946 he had been posted to a Royal Artillery Dispersal Camp in India together with Bernard Day.  He also met Dennis Webb there (see below) and was awaiting the arrival of Brian Gunn (see above).  He also met his brother David while he was on leave in India.

 

Lewis, John                                                                                                                   25, 53

Although I have not been able to trace his family history, the Hall Mark records that he joined the RAF about March 1943 and had completed his tour of operations by July 1945 and ended the war training parachutists.

 

Lewis, Ray                                                                                                                     19, 52

Ray was born in Bristol about March 1922 to Charles and Ada Lewis (nee Willing), who had married there about September 1916.  His mother lived with her parents in Chipping Sodbury while Charles was serving in the forces, and their eldest son Norman was born there about June 1917.  After the war they moved to Bishopston, where Ray’s other brother Donald was born about September 1920 and his sisters Edna and Eileen followed in about June 1924 and June 1930 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Ray was called up shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War.  He was serving in the Middle East by September 1942 and was back home by July 1945.  After the war he met and married Margaret Edwards in Bristol about December 1953 and their daughters Susan and Jane were born there in about June 1956 and December 1960 respectively.

 

Lewis, Ted                                                                                                                     41, 52

Ted was born in Bristol about March 1923 to Edward and Ester Lewis (nee Barnes), who had married there about June 1920.  His sisters Johanna and Eileen followed in about June 1925 and December 1927 respectively.  They settled in Bishopston between the wars and Ted later married Betty Lewis about June 1944, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  According to the Hall Mark, Ted was commissioned about September 1944 and was on his way out to the Far East in July 1945 after a period on embarkation leave.

 

Lloyd, Betty                                                                                                                   22, 58

She was born in Bristol about March 1925 to Richard and Annie Lloyd (nee McNamara) who had married there in about April 1924.  Her sister Rita followed later in about July 1931.  The family had settled in Bishopston during the inter-war years and attended St Michael & All Angels Church.  Betty was a keen Girl Guide and was helping Marion Brace run the Berkeley Road Guides in January 1943. She later married Walter Ford in Bristol about September 1945.  Their son Robert was born in about March 1947 and their daughters June, Pamela, Phillipa and Hazel followed in about September 1948, September 1949, September 1956 and June 1957 respectively.

 

Lloyd, Donald                                                                                                                     29

Donald was born in Bristol about June 1922 to Wilfred and Elsie Lloyd (nee Beer) who had married there in about April 1918.  His older sister Winifred was born about December 1918.  The family settled in the Bishopston area during the inter-war period and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  The Hall Mark notes that Donald was called up by the RAF about September 1943 but we have no other details of his service record.  After the war he married Edna Gillespie in Bristol about September 1949 and their daughter Pamela was born about March 1953 and their son Phillip followed in about June 1955.

 

Locock, David                                                                                                                     25

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that David was born in Chippenham in Wiltshire about March 1922 and that his mother’s maiden name was Isaacs.  His older sister Lorna was born in Keynsham about March 1917.  Some time after this the family moved to Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, David was very keen to serve in the Merchant Navy and after having been turned down by all the major shipping companies, had finally managed to travel around the world in a Norwegian tanker by March 1943.  Shortly after this he met and married Kathleen Beckwith in Bristol about December 1943 and their sons Clive and Neil were born there about March 1948 and December 1949 respectively.

 

Lockyer. Ronald                                                                                                            34, 60

Ronald was born in Bristol about March 1925 to Sydney and Ettie Lockyer (nee Stevens), who had married there about September 1919.  His older sister Betty was also born in Bristol about September 1920 and his younger brother David followed somewhat later in about September 1934.  According to the Hall Mark, Ronald was called up by the Army about January 1944 and was back home on leave by March 1946.  After the war he met and married Lily Wilks in Bristol about March 1954 and their two boys Jeffrey and Andrew were born in Bristol about June 1955 and September 1957 respectively.

 

Long, Norman                                                                                                         34, 53, 60

Norman was born in Bristol about March 1922 to Robert and Ivy Long (nee Williams), who had married there about September 1917.  His sister Doreen was also born in Bristol (December 1919), as were his brothers Robert, Dennis and Clifford in about September 1918, September 1924 and September 1926 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Norman was reported as having disappeared after walking over a ridge in Italy in full view of his Survey Regiment in about January 1944.  No shot was heard but he was later reported as having been taken prisoner and was eventually repatriated about July 1945.  By March 1946 he had been added to the list of those who had been demobilized since   V E Day.  He does not appear to have married after he returned from the war.

 

Lovell, Arthur                                                                                                          19, 34, 60

Arthur was born in Bristol about December 1916 to Frank Arthur and Blanch Lovell (nee Shepherd), who had married there about October 1910.  In 1911 his parents were living at 158 Whitehall Road in the St George area of Bristol where his father ran his butcher’s business.  His older sisters Eva and Laura were born before the First World War in about June 1911 and December 1912 respectively and his younger brother Cecil followed afterwards in about December 1921.  His father was called up by the Army and served with the Hampshire Regiment during latter years of the war.  After the war, the family settled in Bishopston and Arthur later met and married Audrey Bamford there in about December 1939.  Their daughters Wendy and Sandra were also born there in about June 1941 and July 1943 respectively.  Arthur had been called up by this time and was serving in the Middle East by September 1942 and was in India by January 1944.  By March 1946 he had been included on the list of those demoblised after V E Day.

 

Lovell, Betty                                                                                                                  22, 46

Betty was born in Bristol about September 1916, the only child of Ainslie and Mabel Lovell (nee Reed) who had married there about September 1915.  According to the Hall Mark she married Graham Thomas Dennis (known as Tom – see above) in Bristol about June 1942 and was later called up for service with the ATS about January 1943.  She is also recorded as having won the Richard’s Prize in February 1945.  She and Tom later moved to Barnstaple in Devon, where their daughter Linda was born about September 1950, followed by their son Graham in September 1953.

 

Loxton, Grenville                                                                                        29, 41, 46, 56, 60

He was born in Bristol about March 1925 to Joseph and Alice Loxton (nee Grindle), who had married in Cheltenham about March 1918.  His older brother Lionel (see below) was also been born in Bristol about March 1921 and the family lived in Upper Belmont Road in Bishopston during the inter war years.  His father served in France with the Royal Engineers during the later stages of the First World War, seeing action at Third Ypres in 1917 and the major battles of 1918.  According to the Hall Mark, Grenville was called up by the RAF in about September 1943 and was serving in France with the BLA in September 1944.  He was also listed as a winner of the Richard’s Prize in February 1945, although he was serving in Holland at the time.  He later saw service in Germany with the BOAR but was back home on leave in November 1945 and again in March 1946.  He later married Barbara Jones in Bristol about September 1949 and their eldest son Andrew was born in about December 1953, followed by Adrian in September 1955.

 

 

Loxton, Lionel                                                                                                                 6, 38

Brother of Grenville (see above), he was born in Bristol about March 1921.  He was a former chorister at St Michael & all Angels Church and lived in Upper Belmont Road before the war.  He joined the RAF before the war and was serving as a sergeant on Home Service in March 1940 and was based at one of the RAF airfields near Nottingham by March 1944.  While there he met and married Iris Kelley in Nottingham in about September 1944 and remained there after the war, where his son Alan was born about March 1949.

 

Lucas, Leslie                                                                                                                 12, 28

He was killed in a road accident on the 3rd July 1941 while on Home Service with an RAF Maintenance Unit at Slough – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45).

 

Luckham, Walter                                                                                                            6, 43

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Walter was born in Bristol about December 1919 and that his mother’s maiden name was Friend. His family lived in Bishopston before the war and Walter became a keen member of the local 61st Bristol Scout Group.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving in the Army in March 1940.  He was later married to Hazel Jarman (see above) in Bishopston by the Rev D B Hall in about September 1944 and their daughters Jacqueline and Anita were born there about March 1948 and December 1950 respectively.

 

Lumbard, Mr                                                                                                                 22, 61

According to the Hall Mark he lived at Monk Road and took over from Paddy Westcott as church organist on a temporary basis from about January 1943 until Leonard Fluck took over in March 1946.

 

Lyddon, Kenneth Bertram                                                                                                   19

Kenneth was born in Bristol about June 1909 to Cyril Bertram and Elsie May Lyddon (nee Channing), who had married there about September 1907.  His sister Doreen was also born in Bristol about September 1908.  His father worked as an insurance clerk and his paternal grandfather (Horatio Lyddon) was a fire insurance inspector and in 1901 they were living at 18 Lancaster Road in Bishopston.  Sadly Cyril died in the same month that Kenneth was born and in 1911 his widowed wife and children were living with her parents at 21 Brynland Avenue, also in Bishopston.

 

Kenneth’s maternal grandfather (Frederick Channing) was working as a school headmaster at this time and his uncle (Percy Channing) was an assistant master in the same school.  His aunt (Daisy Channing) was working as a clerk for a wholesale grocer at this time.  His mother does not seem to have remarried and Kenneth and his sister grew up in their grandparent’s home, from where they would have attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  He was called up during the early years of the Second World War and according to the Hall Mark he was serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  After the war he resumed the threads of his life in Bristol, eventually marrying Kathleen Turner at the age of 60 in June 1969.

 

Lye, Miss                                                                                                           22, 33, 46, 49

Peggy Lye was born in Bristol about September 1923 to Herbert and Winifred Lye (nee Stradling) who had married there about September 1920.  Her older sister Mildred was also born in Bristol about June 1922 and her younger brothers Robert and Herbert were born there about June 1925 and March 1929 respectively.  Her father enlisted in the 1/6 Territorial Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment before the First World War and went them to France on the 30th of March 1915.  He saw action at the Somme and Third Ypres before being wounded and transferred to the Labour Corps, from which he was eventually discharged on health grounds on the 18th of March 1918.  After the war the family was living in the Bishopston area of Bristol and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Peggy was running her own Bible Class in January 1943 and organised the Pantomime for the Sunday School Party that year and all subsequent ones up to March 1946.  She was also leader of the Girl’s Club with Dora Lamble (see above) for many years.  After the war she met and married Stephen Wall in Bristol about March 1949 and their daughter Pauline was born there about June 1953.

M

Malone, Pat                                                                                                                         58

Pat and her twin brother James were born in the West Derby district of Liverpool about December 1925 to William and Lilian Malone (nee Stockdale), who had married there about September 1920.  Her older brother Laurence and younger sister Mary were also born in West Derby in about March 1921 and December 1929 respectively.  Some time during the 1930s the family moved to live at Longfield Road in Bishopston, from where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  During the war she met and became engaged to Denis Skinner (see below) shortly before he was posted to the Middle East in about September 1942.   He remained there until he returned home in about September 1945, whereupon he immediately went to see the Rev Hall to arrange a date for the wedding, which took place the same month.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Marlow, Mr                                                                                                                           6

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was a former choir member who was serving with the Army in March 1940.

 

Martin, John                                                                                                                          6

I have not been able to trace John’s early family history but the records show that he was born in Bristol about December 1919 and that his mother’s maiden name was Bees.  According to the Hall Mark he was a former chorister and was serving with the Army in March 1940.  After the war he met and married Edith Brown in Bristol about December 1946 and they had 3 children – Shiela, Charles and Graham who were born in Bristol about September 1949, June 1952 and June 1954 respectively.

 

Martin, William                                                                                                                   28

He was an air gunner/wireless operator in the RAF who was killed in action when his Blenheim light bomber was hit by enemy fire and crashed in France on the 27th of December 1939 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Matthews, Alfred                                                                                                     29, 38, 53

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Alfred was born in Bristol about June 1919 and that his mother’s maiden name was Cobbold.  His elder brother Walter was also born in Bristol about December 1916, and his sisters Lilian and Edna followed in about December 1917 and December 1921 respectively.  The family lived in the Bishopston area of Bristol during the inter war years and Alfred later married Myfanwy Short in about October 1939 and their son David was born in Bristol about June 1940.  After the war they moved to Thornbury in Gloucestershire where their daughter Patricia was born about March 1948.  According to the Hall Mark, Alfred was called up by the Royal Navy some time after Easter 1943 and was in hospital in London in March 1944.  He made a good recovery, however, and was serving in the Far East by July 1945.

 

May, Leonard                                                                                         6, 15, 18, 41, 57, 61

Len was born in Bristol about June 1918 to Frank and Miriam May (nee Gould), who had married there about September 1911.  His older brother Ron (see below) was also born in Bristol about December 1913. His father was working a clerk for a corn merchant at this time.  The family lived in Bishopston between the wars and attended at St Michael & all Angels Church, where Len served as a chorister.  According to the Hall Mark he was serving with the Royal Navy Reserve in March 1940, where he was undergoing training at HMS Flying Fox in Bristol.  By February 1942 he been torpedoed twice but was still alive and kicking and was back at sea the following September.

 

According to an article published in the Bristol Evening Post on the 12th of January 1942 he had first survived the sinking of HMS Laurentic 150 miles off the West Coast of Ireland by U99 (commanded by the German U-Boat Ace Otto Ktretschmer) on the 3rd November 1940, together with her sister ship HMS Patroclus.  They were eventually rescued by Captain McIntyre in HMS Hesperus who 4 months later sank the U99 and captured Otto Kretschmer in his new ship HMS Walker.  After this Len was posted to the Auxiliary Fleet Carrier HMS Audacity, which was equipped with Martlett strike aircraft from 802 Squadron.  She was assigned to convoy duty on the Gibraltar and Atlantic trade routes.  She continued with these duties until she was sunk by U571 while escorting convoy HG76 on passage from Gibraltar on the 21st December 1941.  This time Len was forced to dive 50 feet into the sea, where he had to survive for about an hour in the freezing water before he was picked up.

 

Before the war, Len was well know in Bristol for his xylophone cabaret act and by September 1944 the Hall Mark notes that he was back at home playing his xylophone on national radio and had also made a recording for the Navy’s own show “Navy Mixture”.  By November 1945 he had been demobilised and at Christmas he helped entertain 250 poor children at their Christmas Party by playing the xylophone, accompanied by John Woodland (see below) on the accordion.  After the war he met and married Joan Fowler in Bristol about June 1963 and their eldest son Robert was born there about September 1965.  Shortly after this they moved to Weston Super Mare where their daughter Jaqueline was born about June 1968.  Some time after this they moved again to Truro in Cornwall where their youngest son Mark Antony was born about December 1973.

May, Ron                                                                                                                 18, 30, 42

Brother of Len (see above), Ronald was born in Bristol about December 1913.  He grew up in the Bishopston area of Bristol and later served in the Royal Navy during the interwar years.  After leaving the Navy he met and married Rosamund Spencer in Bristol about April 1939.  Their eldest son Maurice was born in Wells in Somerset the following December, after which they returned to Bristol where his brother Rodney was born about March 1941.  A Royal Navy Reservist at the outbreak of War, Ronald was serving at HMS Flying Fox – a RNR training unit based at Winterstoke Road in Bristol – in 1940.  He was serving at sea by September 1942 and by September 1943 had been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and was stationed in Alexandria in Egypt.  By September 1944 he was back at HMS Flying Fox.

 

McCarthy, W                                                                                                                       18

William McCarthy was born in Bristol about September 1919 to William and Ellen McCarthy (nee Price), who had married there about December 1915.  He was followed by his sister Mary in about June 1921 and by Daniel, Ellen, Kathleen and Terrence in about September 1923, March 1926, March 1928 and September 1930 respectively.  His father had served a driver with the RASC during latter part of the First World War, manning the horse driven wagons taking food and other supplies up to the front line.  According to the Hall Mark, William was called up by the Royal Navy quite early on during the Second World War and was serving at sea by September 1942.  Prior to this he had met and married Vera Jones in Bristol about April 1942 and their daughter Sandra was born the following September.  Their son Kenneth followed in about September 1944.  After the war the family moved to Thornbury in Gloucestershire where their second son Keith was born about September 1958.

 

McGhee, Charles                                                                                                                53

Unfortunately I have been unable to discover Charles’ family history but according to the Hall Mark he was serving with the BLA in Germany in July 1945.

 

Meaden, Bryan                                                                                                                    43

Bryan was born in Wellington in Somerset about March 1926 to Fred and Christine Meaden (nee Law), who had married in Bristol about December 1922.  His father had served with the heavy guns of the Royal Garrison Artillery during the later stages of the First World War.  The family later settled in Bishopston, where his sister Diana and younger brother John were born about September 1930 and March 1935 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Bryan was called up by the Royal Navy some time after Easter 1944.  After the war he met and married Jean Shenton in Bristol about September 1948 and their daughters Belinda and Catherine were born there about December 1951 and September 1953 respectively.

 

Mees, Brian                                                                                                       25, 52, 56, 60

Brian was born in Bristol about September 1924, the only son of Albert and Gertrude Mees (nee Taylor) who had married there in about September 1922.  His father had served with the mechanised transport section of the RASC bringing up supplies to the front line during the latter stages of the First World War.  After the war his parents set up a fruit and vegetable shop on the Gloucester Road in Bishopston.  According to the Hall Mark, Brian was called up by the Army about March 1943 and was serving in the Far East by July 1945.  By November 1945 he had met up with Sid Stirratt in Palestine and on Christmas Eve took midnight communion at Bethlehem.  After the war he met and married Hazel Simper in Bristol about September 1947 and their son Alan was born there in about June 1950.  Hazel’s brother Terry was the organist at the Church of the Good Shepherd and later became a minister.

 

Middle, Albert                                                                                                                     46

Brother of Cecil (see below), he was born in Bristol about March 1926 to Sidney and Marjory Middle (nee Rhodes), who had married in Clutton in Somerset about April 1919.  He had one other brother – Stanley – who was also born in Bristol about June 1924 and three sisters – Joan, Dorothy and Barbara who were born about December 1922, December 1928 and March 1931 respectively  According to the Hall Mark, Albert was called up by the Army some time after September 1944.  After the war he met and married Audrey Smith in Bristol about March 1949 and their son Robert was born there about September 1952, with their daughter Janet following in about March 1956.

 

Middle, Cecil                                                                                                     19, 45, 47

Brother of Albert (see above), he was born in Bristol about December 1919.  He joined the RAF during the early years of the Second World War and was serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  By February 1945 he had been promoted to Flight Lieutenant and was back home, after serving several years overseas.  By this time he had settled in Romford in Essex where he met and married Eileen Bose in January 1945.  Their daughter Jennifer was born there the following December and his son Phillip followed in September 1947.

 

Mikelburgh. Kenneth                                                                                                     18, 38

Kenneth was born in Bristol about December 1918 to Herbert Charles and Minnie Mikelburgh (nee Clarke), who had married there about March 1912.  His older brother Arthur was also born in Bristol about September 1915 and his younger brother Dennis followed in about September 1922.  His father enlisted in the motorized transport section of the RASC on the 29th of November 1915.  He went to France in 1916 and was invalided out on health grounds on the 6th of February 1917.  The family settled in the Bishopston between the wars and Kenneth was called up by the Royal Navy in the early months of the Second World War.  He was serving at sea by September 1942 and some time after this he was either injured or taken ill and by March 1944 had spent several months in a hospital in Johannesburg in South Africa.  He does not appear to have married, although his older brother Arthur did marry Dorothy Lovell in Bristol about

June 1941 and their daughter Sally was born there in about September 1944.

 

Milburn, Barbara                                                                                                          22, 42

Sister of John (see below), she was born in Bristol about September 1922 to Arthur and Dorothy Milburn (nee Williams) who had married there about December 1921.  Her brother John was also born in Bristol about June 1927.  The family lived in Seymour Road before the war and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  During the war she met and married Gordon Price (see below) in Bristol about July 1942 and was serving with the ATS by September of that year.  By September 1944 she had become only the second woman from this Parish to rise to a commissioned rank in the Women’s Services (see also Joan Knuckey above).  After the war she moved to the Manchester area, where her husband came from, and their son Leslie was born there about June 1954.

 

Milburn, John                                                                                                                      57

Brother of Barbara (see above), he was born in Bristol about June 1927.  He was a former member of the Bible Class and according to the Hall Mark had been called up by the Army by November 1945.  After he completed his National Service he moved to Dewsbury in Yorkshire where he met and married Vera Tordoff in about March 1959, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Millard, Ernest                                                                                                                    28

He was killed in a flying accident while undergoing training at RAF Kinloss in Scotland on the 24th of September 1940 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Millard, Joan                                                                                                                       23

Joan was born in Bristol about June 1919 to Fred and Lillian Millard (nee Jones), who had married there about October 1911.  Her father was working as an ironmonger at this time and her grandfather was a retired policeman living at 28 Filton Road in Horfield, together with his wife Ellen and three other children.  Her older sister Kathleen was also born in Bristol about June 1912.  Her father was an ambulance driver with the Territorial RAMC before the First World War and served with them in Gallipoli and Salonika from the 7th of October 1915, later transferring as a driver to the horsed transport section of the RASC.  He was discharged in 1919 and the family settled in Bishopston between the wars.  No doubt inspired by her grandfather, Joan enlisted in the Police Force in about September 1940 and was posted to Sudbury in Suffolk, where she met and married Rodney Wilkins in about March 1942.  Shortly after this she and her husband returned to Bristol, where her daughter Elizabeth was born about September 1943.  After the war they had 2 more daughters – Mary and Jane – born about June 1947 and Jun 1949 respectively.  Many years later their only son Paul was born in Bristol about September 1964.

 

Mixed Youth Club                                                                                                    25, 42 61

This had been set up by March 1943 and was regarded as a minor scandal by the Rev Hall.  They met once a month and by September 1944 were enjoying mixed hikes to Patchway Woods, Leigh Woods, Severn Beach and other places.  By March 1946 they had started a Mixed Youth Club for 18-30 year olds.

 

Moon, Ivor                                                                                                              30, 42, 52

Ivor was born in Timsbury about September 1913 to John Henry and Mabel Moon (nee Dascombe), who had married there about December 1908.  His sister Doris was also born there in about March 1910 and his older brother Victor and younger sister Gwendoline followed in about September 1911 and June 1916.  His father working at the nearby Pit Bank colliery at this time and was responsible for weighing the coal as it was brought to the surface. He was already a sergeant in the North Somerset Yeomanry (a Territorial Cavalry Regiment) when the First World War broke out and remained in England on Home Service until he was transferred to the 5th Battalion of the Dorset Regiment towards the end of 1916.  He was subsequently killed in action while serving in the front line on the 12th of December 1916.  Unfortunately his body was never recovered and his name was placed on the Thiepval monument to the 72,000 men listed as missing on the Somme.

 

Ivor and his brothers and sisters were therefore brought up in Bishopston by his widowed mother during the inter war years and he later met and married Margaret Williams there in about March 1941.  He was called up by the Royal Navy and according to the Hall Mark was serving with Paiforce in Iraq/Persia by September 1943.  He was still there in September 1944, serving in an isolated spot with Ferry Control.  He was back home on leave and reunited with his wife by July 1945, having completed his tour of duty overseas.  After the war they had two children Kathleen and Robert who were born about December 1948 and December 1951 respectively.

 

Moon Joan                                                                                                                          23

Joan was born in Hereford about June 1922 to Thomas and Mary Moon (nee Fencott), who had married in Newent in Gloucestershire about September 1921.  Her younger sister and brother Eileen and Arthur were also born there in about December 1924 and March 1926 respectively.  Her father originally came from West Harptree in Somerset, where he joined D Company of the 1/4 (City of Bristol) Territorial Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment before the First World War. He went with them to France on the 31st of March 1915 and saw action at the battles of the Somme and Third Ypres before finishing the War in Italy with the rank of acting Sergeant having seen further battles at the Asiago Plateau and Vittoria Veneto.  He moved to Hereford after the war, where he met and married Mary Fencott.  Some time after 1926 the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark Joan had trained as a nurse and joined the Volunteer Aid Detachment.  She was serving away from Bristol by September 1942 but returned after the war and married Clifton Allan there in about September 1945.  They later had 2 boys Courtenay and Andre who were born in Bristol about June 1950 and December 1963 respectively.

 

Monckton, Eric                                                                                                              21, 53

Eric was born in Bristol about September 1896 to John and Mary Sarah Monckton (nee Waters) and in 1901 they were living at “Sunny Side” on The Avenue in the St Georges area of Bristol, together with his brother Sydney and sister Margery.  Also living with them was his cousin Alec Johnson (aged 15) who was working as a junior clerk, while his father was working as an assistant schoolmaster at this time.  His father was still working as a teacher in 1911, although the family had now moved to 15 Berkeley Road in Bishopston area where his parents remained for the rest of their lives.  His sisters Joyce and Cicely and brothers John and Kenneth had also been added to the family.  His brother Sydney later died in a collision with another submarine while serving with the Royal Navy off the East Coast near Harwich on the 15th of August 1916 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1914-1918) for further details.

 

I have not been able to trace Eric’s service record during the First World War but, it seems likely that he served with the RNAS and transferred to the RAF after the war ended.  In any event he survived the war and later married a Florence Fowell in Bristol about June 1924, although I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  His father (see below) later served on the St Michael’s & All Angels Parochial Church Council in the 1920s.  The family continued to maintain their links with the church and the Hall Mark records that during the Second World War, Eric was serving with the RAF and that his bomber was shot down over Germany towards the end of 1942.  He was taken prisoner and eventually repatriated about July 1945.

 

Monckton, John                                                                                                                   21

A former schoolmaster and member of the Parochial Church Council, he was born in Wolverhampton about September 1865 and died in Bristol on the 18th of March 1936.  He married Mary Sarah Waters in about September 1894 and by 1911 they were living at 15 Berkeley Road in Bishopston, together with their 7 children.  His eldest son Sydney was killed when his submarine collided with another during a training exercise during the First World War – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1914-18) for further details.  His second son Eric survived the war and later served with Bomber Command in the Second – see above.

 

Morgan, Eric                                                                                                     42, 52, 54, 62

Eric was born in Chipping Sodbury in Gloucestershire about December 1923 to William and Ivy Morgan (nee Wheeler), who had married in Westbury in Wiltshire about October 1922.  His brothers Basil and Evan were also born in Chipping Sodbury in about June 1926 and June 1928 respectively.  Some time after this the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at the local St Michael & All Angels Church.  Eric was called up during the middle years of the Second World War and according to the Hall Mark was serving in Lagos in Nigeria by September 1944, where he met Bishop Vinning several times.  By July 1945 he was back home on leave and had become engaged to Kathleen Francombe (see above), who he later married at the Church of the Good Shepherd in April 1946.  Their daughter Jennifer was born in Bristol about September 1948, followed by their son Richard in about September 1950.

 

Morgan, Leslie                                                                                                              19, 56

Leslie was born in Bristol about December 1918 to Albert and Maud Morgan (nee Cater), who had married there about March 1913.  His elder brother Albert was also born in Bristol about December 1913 and his elder sister Irene followed in about December 1915.  Leslie was followed by Ruby, Cicely, George, Bertie, Dorothy and Victor who were born about September 1920, December 1922, September 1925, September 1927, March 1930 and June 1933 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Leslie Joined the RAF quite early in the war and was undergoing flying training in Canada by September 1942.  He returned in time to marry Freda Topp in about September 1943 and their only daughter Janet was born in Bristol about March 1945.  He was later posted to the Far East and was serving in Singapore by November 1945.

 

Morris, [John H] Godfrey                                                                                      17, 38, 40

He and his twin sister Edith were born in Bristol about March 1922 to John and Edith Louise Morris (nee Godfrey) who had married the previous year.  His mother Edith had been previously married to Sidney Albert Davis who had been killed in action at Langemarck on the 28th of September 1917 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1914-18) for further details.  The family maintained close links with St Michael & All Angels Church during the inter-war years and the Hall Mark notes that Godfrey was serving with the Army in Iceland during the early years of the Second World War.   He had returned home by September 1942 and had married Margaret Malaher by the following December.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  By March 1944 he had been promoted to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant and posted to a Devonshire Regiment.  This was probably the recently converted 12th Regiment, which formed part of the 6th Air Landing Brigade of the 6th Airborne Division and in which Vivian Webb served and died in August 1944 – see below.  By September 1944 Godfrey was back home, having been wounded in the fighting in Normandy.  His sister Edith later married Stuart Warr after the war and had two daughters Diana and Ann – see below.

 

Mumford, Jack [John H]                                                                                                 53

Jack was born in Bristol about March 1920 to Edmund and Hilda Mumford (nee Maine), who had married there in about September 1918.  His younger sister Mavis was also born in Bristol some years later in about June 1928.  His father was called up during the First World War and served with the Manchester Regiment from about 1917.  According to the Hall Mark, Jack served as Secretary to the Isle of Wight Camp (see above) before the war and later met and married Ivy Holloway in Bristol about June 1941.  Some time after this he was called up by the Army and was serving as Deputy Assistant Adjutant General in West Africa by July 1945.  After the war their only son Barrington J Mumford was born in Bristol about June 1950.

 

Murray, Mr J A                                                                                                           7, 9, 33

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was the priest in charge at the Church of the Good Shepherd in March 1940.   He later moved to become Vicar of St Michael & All Angels Church at Windmill Hill in Bedminster in September of that year.   He served there throughout the height of the Blitz but by January 1944 had left there to take charge of a Parish in Nuneaton.

N

Neale, Donald                                                                                                                     56

Donald and his twin sister Dorothy were born in Solihull near Birmingham about June 1926 to Alfred and Mrs Neale (nee Davies), who had married there about June 1921.  His older brother Sidney was also born in Solihull about December 1923, together with his younger brothers Christopher and Philip in about March 1928 and December 1929 respectively.  Shortly after this the family moved to the Bishopston where another brother David was born about December 1937.  His parents later returned to Solihull during the war, where his youngest brother Brian was born about March 1942.  Donald remained in Bristol, however, and was serving in the Mediterranean by November 1945.  After the war he met and married Kathleen King in Weston Super Mare about September 1949 and later moved to the Gloucester area, where his daughters Mary and Susan were born about June 1951 and September 1956 respectively.

 

Nethercott, Eileen                                                                                                      6, 23, 53

See also under Eileen Harding (above). Sister of Edgar and Gilbert Harding, she was born in Bristol about March 1921.  Like Edgar, she was a former Sunday School Teacher at St Michael & all Angels Church and had been called up by the WAAF by March 1940. She later married Ken Nethercott (see below) in Bristol about July 1941 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  She was eventually demobilised by July 1945 a few weeks before her husband returned home on leave after several year’s service overseas.

 

Nethercott, Eric                                                                                                       12, 28

Brother of Kenneth, he joined the RAF shortly after the outbreak of war and was killed in action when his Blenheim light bomber was shot down in a raid over the port of Bremen on the 4th of July 1941 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Nethercott, Kenneth                                                                                          19, 25, 45, 52

Ken was born in Bristol about March 1920 to Victor Granville and Evelyn Agnes Nethercott (nee Allmutt), who had married in her home town of Havant in Hampshire about October 1915.  His brother older brother Eric was born about December 1918 followed by Francis in 1923 and Maurice in 1926.  His father was born in Bedminister in about 1892 and after he married Evelyn in 1915 they were living at 57 Filton Avenue in Horfield.  He served as a subaltern in France with the Gloucestershire and King’s Liverpool Regiments from about October 1915.  At some point during the inter war years the family moved to Bishopston, where they would have attended St Michael & All Angels Church.  After the Second World War his parents moved to Weymouth in Dorset.

 

Ken married Eileen Harding (see above) on the 12th September 1941 (a photograph of their wedding was published in the Bristol Evening Post on the same day), shortly before embarking for service overseas.  He was serving with the Army in the Middle East by September 1942 and had been posted to India the following March.  By February 1945 he had been a sergeant for 2 years and was having his leg pulled by his mates for still being addressed as Corporal Nethercott in the letters sent to him by the ChurchWarden.  By July 1945 he was back home on leave having finished his tour of duty overseas.  He was joined by his wife who had been demobilised from the WAAF a few weeks earlier.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Sadly he and Eileen separated after the war and he remarried to Irene May Boot in Croyden in Surrey about December 1946.  They later moved to 5 Marlowe Gardens in Worksop in Nottinghamshire where Kenneth died on the 9th of July 1964 aged 44, leaving some £4,465 to his widow.  As for his two surviving brothers, Francis served with the RAF during the latter stages of the war and was Mentioned in Despatches on the 28th of March 1945.  He stayed on after the war and in 1953 was serving as a Flying Officer with the Fighter Control Branch.  He married Nora Hall in Bathavon about December 1947 and after he left the RAF rose to become head of the Printing Department at the College of Art in Guilford in Surrey.  He later retired to 32 The Shinnings in Boxgrove Road in Guildford where he eventually died on the 29th of June 2005 aged 82.  As for Maurice, he married Vera Symes in Weymouth about December 1950 and they lived together there until his death in about March 2005.  I have been unable to trace any children for either of these marriages.

 

Newport, Eric                                                                                                          17, 30, 41

Brother of Maurice (see below), he was born in Bristol about June 1918 to Albert and Dorothy Newport (nee Jones), who had married there about June 1916.  His father was called up about 1917 and had served in the motorized section of the RASC during the latter part of the First World War.  His brother Maurice was born about March 1922 and they both lived with their parents in Dongola Road in Bishopston before the Second World War.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and the brothers later became members of the Bible Class.  Eric was called up by the Army shortly after war was declared and later met and married Ellen L’anson in Wycombe in Leicestershire about March 1941 who was serving there with the WAAF at the time.  He was posted overseas shortly afterwards and was serving at Malta by September 1942.  He later met up with his brother Maurice, when the latter’s ship called there in about September 1943.  He was back home by September 1944 having earned an MID for the fine work he did at Malta.  After the war they lived for a while in Amersham in Leicestershire, where his daughter Vivienne was born in about June 1946, but later returned to Bristol where Eric worked for Charles Hill’s shipbuilders for many years.

 

Newport, Maurice                                                            18, 25, 30, 41, 45, 52, 54, 60, 61

Brother of Eric (see above), he was born in Bristol about March 1922 and lived with his parents in Dongola Road in Bishopston before the Second World War.  He was called up by the Royal Navy quite early in the war and was serving at sea by September 1942.  He had met up with Derek Warwick in Algiers by March 1943 and with his brother in Malta the following September.  By February 1945 he had been buying stockings in Florence for 30 shillings (presumably for his girl friend Molly Webster) and by July was back home on leave and engaged to be married.  He had been demobilized by March 1946 and married Molly in Doncaster the following April.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Newton, Donald                                                                                                                  53

David was born in Bristol about September 1916 the only son of Edmund and Annie Newton, who had married there in about September 1915.  The family settled in Bishopston during the inter war years and Donald was later called up by the Royal Navy some time after February 1945.  After the war he moved to Wallasey in Cheshire where he met and married Elsie Allen in about January 1947 and their son Lindsay was born there the following September.  They later moved to Buckley in Cheshire where their daughter Karen was born about June 1954 and the twins Michael and Peter followed in about June 1958.

 

Newton, Mr                                                                                                                         45

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was serving with the BLA in Germany by February 1945.

 

Nicholls, David                                                                                                                   53

David was born in Bristol about September 1927 to Edmund and Winifred Nicholls (nee Fry), who had married there about March 1915.  His sisters Doreen and Patricia were also born in Bristol about September 1922 and September 1924 respectively.  The family lived at 512 Gloucester Road before the war and attended at the Church of the Good Shepherd.  David was later called up by the Royal Navy on the 6th of June 1945 and served as a stores assistant aboard HMS George at Devonport, and later with the Home Fleet, until he was demobilised in January 1948.  Prior to his enlistment he was working in Bath and as young teenager served as a volunteer Animal Guard during the Blitz. His main duties being to find and return to their owners any pets found missing during the bombing raids.

 

After the war he met and married Dorothy Hiles in Bristol about September 1957.  Her father William Ewart Hiles was called up in early 1940 and was posted Aldershott where he came under the command of the RASC.  He was later promoted to Lieutenant and in 1943 was posted to the West Indies where he was eventually promoted to Captain.  He was placed in charge of stores, supplies and transport for the forces keeping watch over the Panama Canal and remained there until the end of hostilities. He eventually returned to England in 1946 after overseeing the decommissioning of his former base of operations.

 

David and Dorothy later had four children – David, Elizabeth, Kathrine and James who were born about March 1959, September 1960, June 1963 and June 1967 respectively.  The family lived at 50 Kings Drive in the Bishopston area of Bristol and attended regularly at the Church of the Good Shepherd, where both David and Dorothy continue to sing in the choir to the present day.  David also served at chairman of the 61st Bristol Scout Group and was later appointed President of the Bristol North West District Scout Association.

 

Nicola, Doris                                                                                                                       26

Doris was born in West Ham in London about June 1922 the only daughter of Joseph and Mrs Nicola (nee Abbott), who had married there the previous January.  At some point after this they moved to Bishopston where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, she was called up by the WAAF about March 1943 where she was presumably posted to an airfield in Kent.  She stayed there after the war and later met and married Trevor Harrison in Dartford about June 1948.  Some time after this they moved to live near her relatives in West Ham where their only daughter Teresa was born about September 1961.

 

Norman, Frank                                                                                                       34, 42, 56

Brother of Richard (see below), Frank was born in Bristol about September 1925 to William and Mary Norman (nee Monckton) who had married there about December 1924.  His brother Richard followed in about March 1927.  His father had served in France with the Labour Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment from about June 1916, which later became part of the Labour Corps in April 1917.  He therefore spent much of the war maintaining the roads and other infrastructure needed to service the Front Line.  However by 1918 the manpower shortages resulted in his transfer to frontline duties which he maintained to the end of the war.  Between the wars the family lived at 65 Church Road in Horfield, although they attended at St Michael & all Angels Church in Bishopston.  Frank was later called up by the RAF in about January 1944.  He had gained a wing and 3 stripes as a signaler by the following September and was serving with Transport Command by November 1945.  After leaving the RAF he met and married Kathleen Knight in Bristol about June 1949.  Shortly after this they moved to Leicester where their children Kathleen, Janet, Gary and Julie were born about December 1951, June 1953, December 1961 and December 1965 respectively.

 

Norman, [William] Richard                                                                                        53, 56

Brother of Frank (see above), William Richard Norman was born in Bristol about March 1927.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Army some time after February 1945 and was serving in India by the following November.  After the war he met and married Edith Hunt in Bristol about December 1951 and their boys Phillip and Simon were born there about December 1953 and March 1956 respectively.  Some time after this they moved to Poole in Dorset where their daughter Nicola was born in about September 1963.

 

North, Elizabeth                                                                                                                  29

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace Elizabeth’s family history but according to the Hall Mark she was called up by the Women’s Services shortly after Easter 1943.

O

Oatway, Arthur                                                                                                                   18

Arthur Charles Oatway was born in Bristol about March 1907 to Charles and Emma Francis Oatway (nee Cording) and in 1911 he was living at 36 Victoria Avenue in the Redfield area of Bristol, together with his sister Winnie (aged 7) and his brother Harold (aged 6).  His father had worked as a carpenter in the Bedminster area but died in about September 1907, shortly after Arthur was born.  His mother was therefore working as public lavatory attendant for the Bristol Corporation at this time and renting 2 rooms from Francis James Davis, who was a shipping clerk for a lead manufacturer and merchant.   His mother later remarried to Alfred Lucas, a former horse driver for the Railway Company who lived off Bath Road in the Knowle area of Bristol before the First World War.  Arthur clearly managed to overcome this difficult start in life and later married Kathleen Morgan in about September 1936.  They settled in Bishop Road before the war and attended at St Michael & all Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Royal Navy shortly after the outbreak of war and was serving at sea by September 1942.  He returned to Bristol after the war and his son Martin was born there about September 1946.

 

Orbell, the Rev J H R, MA (Oxon)                                                                                     38

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was due to take over from the Rev Down as priest in charge of the Church of the Good Shepherd in May 1944.  He had served for 3 years at Clifton Parish Church before going to Ashtead in Surrey.  According to the Rev Hall he had a charming wife and he was sure that they would do well in Bristol.

 

Owen, Ken                                                                                            19, 42, 45, 52, 60, 61

Ken was born in Bristol about June 1921 the only son of Bruce St Clair and Mabel Owen (nee Turner), who had married there about December 1918.  His father was a Territorial soldier who had served with the North Somerset Yeomanry before the First World War but later transferred to the Royal Engineers in the 61st (Sou8th Midland) Division.  Rising to the rank of Sergeant, he went to France in May 1916 with the RE signals company and would have seen action at Fromelles, Langemarck, Cambrai, the German Spring Offensives on the  Somme and the Lys and the final advance in Picardy.  The family lived in Radnor Road between the wars and Ken became a keen member of the local 61st Bristol Scout Troop.  He was called up by the Army shortly after the Second World War started and was serving with the 8th Army in the Middle East by September 1942.  By September 1944 he had written to the Rev Hall giving an extensive account of the battlefields from El Alamein to Tunis, Sicily and Italy, together with a fine dissertation on the need to build a new world when the war was over.  By February 1945 he had been to Rome and was serving in Northern Italy.  He was back home on leave by the following July and by March 1946 he was awaiting demobilization, having married Joyce Hawker in Cheltenham the previous January.  They later settled in Bristol and had 4 children – Sandra, Trevor, Rachel and Christopher – about March 1947, March 1950, June 1955 and December 1958 respectively.

P

Packer, Fred                                                                                                           18, 26, 28

He was a Petty Officer (Motor Mechanic) in the Royal Navy married to fellow scout Wallace Chamberlain’s sister Eileen (see above) and was killed in action when his troopship HMS Karanja was sunk on the 12th of November 1942, while supporting the invasion of Algiers (Operation Torch) – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Pain, “Bill”                                                                                                                         18

Known as “Bill”, Louis Pain was born in Bristol about September 1922 To Frederick and Mary Pain (nee Phillips), who had married there in about December 1917.  His older sister Vera (see below) was also born in Bristol about December 1919 and the family lived at Melbourne Road in Bishopston before the war.  According to the Hall Mark, “Bill” was called up by the Royal Navy shortly after war was declared and was serving at sea by September 1942.  After the war he met and married Patricia Bull in Bristol about June 1949 and they later had 2 children – Christine and Geoffrey who were born about September 1954 and March 1958 respectively.

 

Pain, Vera                                                                                                                           35 Sister of “Bill” (see above), she was born in Bristol about December 1919 and lived with her parents at Melborne Road before the war.  During the war she met and married Geoff Warburton (see below) in Bristol about January 1944 and they later had 2 boys – Philip and Roger – who were born about June 1949 and September 1954 respectively.

 

Parks, Christine                                                                                                                  23

Christine was born in Bristol about March 1914 to Hamilton Tovey and Isabel Mary Parks (nee Thomas), who had married in Swindon about June 1909.  Her older sisters Barbara, Cynthia, and Mary were also born in Bristol about September 1910, June 1911 and December 1912 respectively.  Her younger brothers and sisters – John, Diana and David – were born about December 1916, September 1919 and June 1928 respectively.  In 1911 the family was living at 25 Julius Road in Bishopston, together with her widowed grandmother and their domestic servant Edith Embling aged 18.  They also had a Harry Sworder boarding with them, who was working as a commercial traveler for the millinery industry. Her father was working as a commercial traveler for the glove industry at this time.  The family attended regularly at St Michael and All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Christine was called up by the WAAF about January 1943 but does not appear to have married after the war had ended.

 

Partridge, Leslie                                                        4, 11, 13, 17, 20, 22, 37, 44, 45, 50, 54

Leslie Victor Partridge was born in Bristol about December 1899 to Henry Benjamin and Edith Ellen Partridge (nee Rider), who had married there on the 5th of June 1897.  In 1901 they were living at 59 Bishop Road in Bishopston and his father was working as a harness maker for the Tramway Company at this time.  They were still there in 1911 and his sister Irene Evelyn Partridge had been added to the family in about March 1906.  During the First World War his father enlisted in the RASC on the 10th of November 1915 at the age of 46, following an appeal for volunteers in the local newspaper.  After training as a driver he served in France for the last 2 years of the war taking supplies up to the front line in his lorry.

 

Leslie had been associated with St Michael & All Angels Church for many years, being first mentioned as attending at Sunday school in a Church newsletter of 1909.  He met and married Dorothy Fear in about September 1928 and their 3 daughters – Cynthia, Hilary and Madeline – were born about September 1933, March 1936 and September 1937 respectively.  He later served as chairman of the Parish Church Committee in 1931 and during the Second World War he was Church Warden (together with Leonard Watts – see below) and the Sunday Schools’ Superintendant.  He also worked full time carrying out his duties as a wartime Police Constable.

 

In his spare time, he was responsible for compiling the Parish Roll of those called up for the armed forces and ensuring that copies of the church newsletter were distributed to them.  He was also Secretary of a fund that ensured that Christmas Cards or short Greeting Letters were sent to all members of the Parish serving with the armed forces, although as numbers increased this was restricted to those serving overseas.  This Christmas greeting was accompanied by a 5 shilling postal order and, in addition, parcels of books or magazines would be distributed from time to time.  He and the Rev Hall also received hundreds of letters from all over the world, all full of life, fun and happy memories of home and church.  With all these duties it was not surprising that he sometimes found it difficult to keep up with the constant changes in rank and mailing addresses.

 

Payne, Donald                                                                                                                                61

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Donald was born in Bristol about March 1924 and that his mother’s maiden name was Grant.  He had 3 other brothers – George the eldest was born about September 1916 (and known locally as “Ginger” – see below) and the twins Charles and James followed in about December 1921.  The family lived in the Bishopston area of Bristol and according to the Hall Mark Donald had been called up by the Army by March 1946.  After he finished his National Service he moved to Dudley in Staffordshire where he met and married Doris Lee about March 1951.   I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

Payne, “Ginger”[George]                                                                 25, 45, 53, 56, 60

George was the eldest of Donald’s brothers and was born in Bristol about September 1916.  According to the Hall Mark, he had been called up by the Royal Navy by March 1943 and was posted to work on minesweepers and was still doing this by February 1945, having been very busy around D Day.  He was serving in the Far East by July 1945 and was in Singapore the following November.  He later met Wilson Bray at Colombo about March 1946.  Before the war he had met and married Irene Glass in about July 1939 and their daughter Valerie was born about September the following year.

 

Pearce, Eric                                                                                                                        46

Eric was born in Bath about September 1920 to Frederick and Rhea Pearce (nee Chinn), who had married in Axbridge about September 1919.  His brother Anthony was also born in Bath about December 1922.  Some time after this the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Eric was called up by the Army some time after September 1944.  After the war he met and married Sheila Burnell in Bristol about March 1955 and they moved to Plymouth where his eldest daughter Sandra was born about March 1956.  Some time after this they moved back to Bristol where their second daughter Debra Ann was born about December 1966.

 

Pearce, John                                                                                                                       28

He was a corporal with the RAF at the start of the war and was killed on the 26th of October 1940, during a German bombing raid on London – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Phillips, Leslie                                                                                 19, 20, 30, 40, 46

He was a flight sergeant in the RAF and was killed in a bombing raid over Frankfurt on the 22nd of March 1944 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45).

 

Philpott, Eric                                                                                                           19, 20, 53

Eric was born in Bristol about June 1921, the only son of Edward and Maude Philpott (nee King), who had married there about June 1915.  During the First World War his father was called up by the Army and he served the last 2 years in France as a driver in the Royal Field Artillery.  They lived at 86 Berkeley Road in Bishopston between the Wars and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where his father served on the Parochial Church Council in 1936.  His mother also served on the PCC during this period.  Eric joined the RAF shortly after the Second World War broke out and was in Canada and the USA in September 1942, where he earned his “wings” with both the British and American training units. A feat duly publicized in the Bristol Evening Post on the 18th of August 1942, together with a copy of his photograph.  The paper records that he was particularly impressed by the hospitality shown to him by the people in the USA.  By January 1943 he was back home in Bristol with a commission as a fully fledged pilot and by June 1944 had married his girlfriend Ursula Higgins.  By July 1945 he had completed his tour of duty, having flown P51 Mustangs in the later stages of the war.   After the war he returned to Bristol where his only daughter Jane was born about December 1947.

 

Phillpott, Maurice                                                               15, 18, 25, 30, 34, 53, 56, 60, 61

Maurice was born in Bristol about June 1915 to George Frederick and Maude Lillian Kate Phillpott (nee Smith), who had married there about March 1910.  His older brother Thomas was also born in Bristol about June 1911.  His parents were living at 92 Gilbert Road in the Redfield area of Bristol and his father was working as a builder’s clerk at this time.  His father enlisted with the Gloucestershire Regiment during the First World War but later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps and served with them in France from about 1916, rising to the rank of corporal.  After the war the family moved to Bishopston where Maurice became a keen scout and later Scout Leader with the 61st Bristol Scouts.

During the Second World War Maurice lived at 134 Brynland Avenue in Bishopston and married Kate Kew there in about February 1942.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  He was serving with the Army in India the following September and was promoted to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant in about March 1943.  By September 1943 he was still in India and had met up with fellow scout Leslie Beavis at Rawalpindi.  By January 1944 he had been promoted to the rank of Captain and by July 1945 he was a Major.  He had been promoted to acting Lieutenant Colonel by November and was expected home imminently.  By March 1946 he was back home on leave and about to resume his position as leader of the 61st Bristol Scout Troop the following month.  He continued to serve for many years at St Michael & All Angels Church before moving to the Henleaze area of Bristol where he died in about January 1993.

 

Phipps, Jack                                                                                                                  18, 57

Jack was born in Bristol about September 1918 to Gilbert and Annie Phipps (nee Ford), who had married there in about March 1905.  In 1911 his parents were living at 5 Glenburn Road in Kingswood, together with his older brother Gilbert aged 5.  His father and mother were both working in a boot factory at this time.  His brothers Ken and Alfred followed in about June 1912 and June 1915 respectively and his sister Ellen in about March 1920. His father was called up in 1917 and posted to 3rd County of London Yeomanry – a dismounted unit serving in Egypt with the 74th Division.  He would have seen action with them in Palestine at the battle of Gaza, the capture of Jerusalem and at Tell’Asur before moving with them to France in April 1918, where he was posted to the 74th Machine Gun Battalion.  In this capacity he would have taken part in the battles of Bapaume and Epehy and the final advance in Artois and Flanders.  During the inter war years the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Jack was called up by the Royal Navy shortly after war was declared and was serving at sea by September 1942.  He was eventually demobilised about November 1945.  After the war he settled in Bath where he met and married Vivienne Hazel and their children – David and Joan – were born there about March 1947 and September 1949 respectively.

 

Pitman, Joan                                                                                                                       43

Joan was born in Bristol about March 1922 the only child of Reginald and Eveline Pitman (nee Gould), who had married in Honiton in Devon about September 1921.  They later settled in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Joan was called up by the Women’s Services some time after Easter 1944.  After the war she met and married Victor Kingston about September 1949 and moved to Totnes in Devon where their daughter Jane was born about June 1951.

 

Plummer, John                                                                                                                    40

Brother of Kenneth (see below), he was a sergeant (flight engineer) with the RAF and was killed in a bombing raid over Germany on the 25th of April 1944 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Plummer, Kenneth                                                                                                             40 Brother of John (see above), he was a sergeant (Air Gunner/Wireless Operator) in the RAF and was killed in a bombing raid over Berlin on the 23rd of November 1943 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Pollett, Peter                                                                                                     19, 20, 34, 37

He was a pilot officer in the RAF who was killed in a bombing raid over Germany on the 16th of December 1943 aged 22 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Porter, William                                                                                                                    53

Unfortunately I have been unable to trace William’s family history but according to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Army some time after February 1945.

 

Pound, Raymond                                                                                                                25

Raymond was born in Bristol about December 1922 to Ambrose and Mrs Pound (nee Kinman), who had married there about December 1920.  His sister Daisy was also born in Bristol about March 1924.  His father was a trooper in the 2/1st Gloucestershire Yeomanry before the First World War, which was converted to a Cycle Battalion and eventually sent to Ireland in April 1918.  The family lived in Bishopston during the inter war years and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Raymond was called up about March 1943.  After the war he met and married Barbara Mitchell in Sudbury in Suffolk about September 1948.  They decided to settle in Bristol, however, and their daughters Carol and Linda were born there about December 1953 and December 1956 respectively.  Raymond’s mother died shortly after this and his father later remarried to Elsie Stafford in about June 1960.

 

Price, Mrs Gordon                                                                                                              22

Better know as Barbara Milburn – see above – she had been called up by the ATS by September 1942.  Her husband Gordon was born in Wigan about June 1921 to Thomas and Alice Price (nee Bootle) and his brother Thomas followed in about September 1931.  Gordon was called up during the war and met and married Barbara in Bristol about July 1942, while he was on a training course there.  After the war they moved to Manchester where their son Leslie was born about June 1954.

 

Price, Ken                                                                                                                           22

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Ken was born in Bristol about June 1920 and that his mother’s maiden name was Rudge.  His brother John was also born in Bristol about December 1923.  During the war Ken met and married Joyce Cornish in Bristol about December 1942, which was duly noted in the Rev Hall’s Newsletter published the following January.  They remained in Bristol after the war and their son David was born there in about June 1947

 

Promotions                                                                                                                          45

By February 1945, of the 630 individuals who had been called up, 88 were listed as commissioned officers and 165 as NCOs.

 

Pyatt, Reginald                                                                                                              12, 28

A sergeant (Air Gunner) with the RAF he was killed in a bombing raid over Berlin on the 15th of May 1941 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

R

Raselle, Eleanor                                                                                                            29, 42

Eleanor Kate Raselle was born in Bristol about December 1908 to Herbert Amos and Kate Raselle (nee Westlake), who had married there in about September 1901.  Her older brother Herbert Evan was also born in Bristol about September 1904, as was her younger sister Audrey in about June 1914.  In 1901 her grandfather Amos Raselle lived at 6 Lancashire Road in the Bishopston area of Bristol together with his wife Ellen and daughter Ethel.  He owned a Pawnbrokers and Jeweler’s shop on the Gloucester Road, which was managed by his son Herbert assisted by his daughter Ethel.  In 1911 Herbert and his wife Kate were living at 19 Kennington Avenue in Bishopston, together with Eleanor and her brother Herbert Evan.  Neither Eleanor nor her sister Audrey seems to have married.  Her brother Herbert did manage to marry Iris Keith in Bristol about September 1933 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.  The family attended regularly at St Michael & All Angels Church between the wars.  According to the Hall Mark, Eleanor was called up by the Women’s Services some time after Easter 1943 and was serving in Egypt by September 1944.

 

Raymer, the Rev R R,  CMG, DSO, DL, MA                                                                14, 16

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was a Colonel in the Army and the British Chaplain in Greece until the German Army forced his sudden departure via Crete and Egypt in about April 1941.   He acted as a temporary assistant to the in Rev Hall from about February 1942 until he was appointed Rector of West Wickham in Kent the following September.

 

Rees, John                                                                                                                     34, 45

John was born in Bristol about December 1925 to Edward and Florence Rees (nee Headford), who had married there about December 1921.  His older sister Stacey was also born in Bristol about March 1922 and John was followed by Ronald and Godfrey in about June 1928 and March 1931 respectively.  His father joined the 13th Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers during the First World War and went with them to France on the 1st of December 1915.  He first saw action on the Somme when his Division suffered severe casualties in clearing Mametz Wood and did not go in action again until the battles of Pilkem and Langemarck at 3rd Ypres in August 1917.  They saw action on the Somme again during the retreat in March 1918 and at the Hindenburg Line when they helped to capture Villers-Outreux during the second battle of Cambrai.  His final battles took place on the Selle and the Sambre, which formed part of the final advance in Picardy towards the end of the war.  He was discharged on the 20th February 1919 and he and his new wife settled in Bishopston between the wars.  According to the Hall Mark, John was called up by the RAF about January 1944 and was serving with the BLA in Germany by February 1945.  After the war he met and married Joan Roberts in Bristol about September 1949 and their son Mark was born there about September 1955.

 

Rees, the Rev V S J                                                                                                    7, 12, 14

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was Senior Curate at Rotherham Parish Church in March 1940 and was due to join the Rev Hall’s staff the following Easter.  By September 1941 he had been appointed Priest in Charge at St Chad’s in Patchway leaving the Rev Hall to manage single handedly until the Rev Raymer (see above) arrived as a temporary assistant in about February 1942.

 

REME                                                                                                                                 35

Members of this unit attended a training course at the Radnor Road Training Centre which ran from the 2nd of October 1943 to the 15th of January 1944 and they made considerable use of the Canteen’s services during their spare time.  Two of them (Craftsmen Kavanagh and Robinson, the later a former professional footballer with Manchester City) later presented the Canteen with an inscribed cup when they left in January 1944, commemorating their 1,000th cup of tea in the Canteen.

 

Rich, Hilary                                                                                                                 34, 57

Although I have not been able to trace her parents, the records show that Hilary was born in Bristol about September 1924 and that her mother’s maiden name was Blackwell.  Her older sister Sonia was also born in Bristol about March 1920.  The family lived in Kent Road in the Bishopston area of Bristol during the inter-war period and attended at St Michaels & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Hilary was called up by the Women’s Services in about January 1944 and was later demobilised about November 1945.  After the war she met and married Ken Fisher (see above) in Bristol about June 1949 and their children Anthony and Rebecca were born there about September 1951 and December 1959 respectively.

 

Richards, Leslie (“Streako”)                                                                       18, 34, 38, 45, 60

He was born in Bristol about March 1922, the only son of William and Rose Richards (nee Dowling).  His older sister Doreen had been born there in December 1920 and his younger sisters Irene and Betty followed in September 1925 and December 1927 respectively. The family attended St Michael & All Angels church during the inter-war years and it is assumed that Leslie must have attended one or more of the camps run by the Rev Hall, where he earned the nickname “Streako”.  He later became a member of the Bible Class as well.  He was called up by the Army during the war and was serving in India by February 1942.  By January 1944 he had been promoted to the rank of Captain and by March he had spent 2 months in hospital in India.  By February 1945 he was in Burma with the 14th Army and by March 1946 had been added to the list of those demobilised since V E Day.  After the war he met and married Jean Tyler in Bristol about September 1949 and their 2 boys – Michael and Melvyn – were born there about June 1952 and September 1956 respectively.

 

Richings, Dennis                                                                                                           26, 28

He was a Sergeant Air Gunner in the RAF and was killed in action in a bombing raid over Cologne on the 26th of February 1943 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Riddell, Kenneth                                                                                                            12, 28

He was a quartermaster in the Merchant Navy and was killed in action on the 5th of November 1940 when his ship (the SS Maidan) was sunk by the German pocket battleship Admiral Scheer – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Righton, John                                                                                                          38, 52, 60

John was born in Bristol about December 1918 to Herbert Gabriel and Mary Righton (nee Dawe), who had married there about March 1915.  In 1911 his father was boarding at 40 Cricklade Road in Bishopston, where he was working as a clerk with the Post Office.  His mother was living nearby at 30 Theresa Avenue at this time, together with her widowed mother.  His parents settled in Bishopston during the inter war years and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, John was called up by the Army early in the war and by March 1944 had been on home service for several years with the Royal Corps of Signals.  By July 1945 he was serving in the Far East and by March 1946 had been added to the list of those demobilised since V E Day.  Shortly before the war John met and married Betty Matthews in Bristol about September 1939 and their daughter Janet was born there about December 1940.

 

Ring, Maurice                                                                                                               37, 61

Maurice was born in Bristol about December 1926 the only son of Frank and Ellen Ring (nee Garrett), who had married there about September 1924.  According to the Hall Mark Maurice had gained a scholarship to Keble College Oxford (for £100) in about March 1944 and had led a discussion in the Bible Class on the place of religion in Education and the form it should take.  He was later awarded the Richard’s Prize in March 1946.  After the war he moved to Surrey where he met and married Valerie Seall about June 1955 and their two daughters – Jennifer and Philippa – were born there about June 1956 and September 1958 respectively.

 

Robertson, Monica                                                                                                              22

I have not been able to trace her family history but according to the Hall Mark she had been called up by the ATS by January 1943.

 

Robinson, Craftsman                                                                                                          35

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was a former professional footballer with Manchester City, who presented an inscribed cup to the Canteen in about January 1944, from which he and Craftsman Kavanagh of the REME had drunk their 1,000th cup of tea.

 

Rodgers, Gilbert                                                                                                                  19

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was serving with the RAF in Rhodesia in September 1942.

 

Rowsell, Kenneth                                                                                                            6, 34

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was a former Sunday School Teacher who lived with his parents in Bishop Road before the war.  He was serving with the Army in March 1940 and was in Tunisia in January 1944 where he had earned an MID.

S

Salter, Keith                                                                                                                        45

Although I have been unable to trace his parents, the records show that Keith was born in Bristol about March 1914 and that his mother’s maiden name was Bennett.  He was called up by the Army during the Second World War and according to the Hall Mark was serving in Germany with the BLA in February 1945.  During the war he met and married Jean Robb in Weston Super mare about December 1941 and their son David was born in Bristol about September 1942.  After the war they moved to Devon where their daughter Beatrice was born about September 1950.

 

Sampson, Roy                                                                                                         29, 33, 38

Roy was born in Bristol about June 1922 to Henry and Ivy Sampson (nee Evans), who had married there about September 1921.  His younger sister Shiela was also born in Bristol several years later in about December 1934.  According to the Hall Mark, Roy had been called up by the Royal Navy by September 1943 and was awarded the Richard’s Prize the following January.  By March 1944 he was undergoing flying training at Monkton in Canada and subsequently finished his naval career with the Fleet Air Arm.  He does not seem to have married after the war, although his sister did later marry Fred Lyons in Bristol about March 1959.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Satterley, Ralph                                                                                                                   60

Although I have not been able to trace his parents the records show that Ralph was born in Bristol about June 1916 and that his mother’s maiden name was Paske.  During the Second World War he met and married Iris Neale in Bristol about September 1940.  Shortly after this he was called up by the Army and posted overseas and was serving in Bangalore, India by March 1946.  After the war he and Iris moved to Basford in Nottinghamshire where their son Gordon was born about March 1948.  Some time after this they moved to Thanet in Greater London where their daughter Jennifer was born about September 1955.

 

Saunders, Frank                                                                                                      18, 26, 28

He was a member of the Marine Corps serving as a gunner aboard HMS Achilles and was killed in action off Guadalcanal on the 5th of January 1943 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

 

Scouts                                                                        6, 11, 17, 22, 25, 33, 46, 52, 58, 61

The church sponsored scout group (the 61st Bristol [St Michael & All Angels] Scout Group) was well established, having been started back in 1912 and in 1917 it was being run by Mr W M Price of 14 Melbourne Road, assisted by Corporal D Moncrieffe of 57 Ashley Down Road.  Meetings were held every Monday and Thursday at 7.30 pm and at 3.30 pm on Saturdays.  By 1923 the curate (the Rev T D Herbert) and Mr Webber had taken over the leadership of the troop and by 1936 Maurice Philpot was in charge, although he was called up shortly after war was declared.  The Scout Group was very popular and many of the scouts and their leaders served in both World Wars.  In March 1940 the Scout Room had been taken over by the military and so meetings had to be accommodated in other church buildings.  Despite constantly having their leaders called up, the scouts continued to function throughout the war and in September 1942 the famous Isle of Wight summer camp was revived with 25 scouts and 30 boys from the Church Lads Brigade attending.

 

When their leader Ken Fisher was called up in September 1942, Frank Blacklock took over for a while and numbers were still increasing by March 1943.  Jeff Chandler, Ken Hull and John Horlick also helped during this period but by January 1944 they too had been called up and lack of leaders forced the St Michael’s boys to join up with the rival troop at Horfield Parish Church.  They kept their white neckerchiefs and title but came under the instruction of the Horfield scoutmaster who was also the curate there.  They were still parading with the Horfield Troop in February 1945 but had just started meeting again on Wednesday in the Scout Room for patrol work.  By July the Rover Scouts were clearing a site for the erection of a Barrage Balloon Hut and the scouts had taken on a new lease of life.  Several had earned their red and white cords and a record number had signed up for the camp planned for the 1st of September at Brean Down.  More importantly a temporary scoutmaster had been found so that the boys were able to return to their old scout room.  By November 1945 the Rovers had failed to get permission to erect their hut but the Church Halls were expected to be available again in a few weeks.  By March 1946 things were more or less back to normal.  Ken Fisher and Maurice Philpot were back, although the call up of young leaders for National Service continued to be a problem.

 

After the war the scouts continued to go from strength to strength under various leaders until they lost their meeting room when part of the of the Church Halls were demolished and redeveloped as sheltered housing in the 1980s.  However under the leadership of Brian Cox (who had first joined as a cub under Mary Hazelhurst in 1948) and with the help of former Rover Scout Ray Smith, the parents rallied round and a new hut was built on the old tennis court behind St Bonaventure’s Roman Catholic Church.  They remain at the hut to this day, although they now march under the name of the 1st Bishopston Scout Group having merged with the old St Bonaventure’s Scout Group (the 104th Bristol Scouts). The old Scout Group is still remembered, however, and the Group recently celebrated its 100th anniversary in January 2012.  The original building has now been extended and under the leadership of Mike Banfield is currently home to 2 Scout Troops, 2 Cub Packs, 2 Beaver Colonies and an Explorer Unit.

 

Seager, Reg                                                                                                                         61

Reginald  was born in Bristol about June 1927 to James and Bertha Seager (nee Howell), who had married in Chipping Sodbury about October 1916.  Their eldest daughter Joyce was born in Bristol about June 1917 and was followed by Rowland in about March 1921 and Leslie in December 1924.  After Reg, their youngest child (Joan) was born about March 1930.  The family settled in Bishopston during the 1930s and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Reg was called up by the Army some time after November 1945.  After he had completed his National Service he met and married Jean Prosser in Bristol about December 1948.  Some time after this they moved to Poole in Dorset where their daughter Helen was born about June 1952.

 

Servicemen’s Club                                                                                                                9

In September 1940 the Church hoped to set up a Servicemen’s Club that would operate from the New Buildings and eventually set up the Servicemen’s Canteen instead – see above.

 

Shadbolt, Brian                                                                                                             18, 60

Brian was born in Kingston in Surrey about September 1920 to William and Gladys Shadbolt (nee Horlick), who had married there about September 1919.  His sister Brenda and his brother Harold were also born in Kingston about March 1922 and June 1926 respectively.  His father served in the 1/21 Battalion of the London Regiment during the First World War and went to France on the 15th of March 1915.  This was a veteran unit that saw action at Aubers Ridge, Festubert, Loos, the Somme, Messines, Third Ypres, Cambrai, the Spring Offensive and the final advance in Artois, although William himself was wounded some time in 1917 and was engaged behind the front line with the Labour Corps thereafter.  After the war the family lived in Kingston for several years before moving to Bishopston in the 1930s, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Brian was called up quite early and was serving with the Army in India by September 1942.  He finished the war in Germany and was serving with the BOAR by March 1946.  After the war he met and married Doris Springall in Swindon about September 1946.  They then moved to Surrey where his eldest daughter Janet was born in about June 1947.  They later moved to Battersea in London where his son York, and younger daughters Wendy and Helen, were born about September 1949, December 1950 and March 1953 respectively.

 

Shepherd, Frank                                                                                                     29, 45, 60

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Army some time after Easter 1943 and was serving in Germany with the BLA by February 1945.  By March 1946 he was in India, where he had met up with Ken Crane at Bangalore.

 

Shepherd, Miss                                                                                                              11, 37

I have not been able to trace her family history but according to the Hall Mark she was a Sunday School Teacher in March 1941 and in March 1944 was Hon. Secretary of the Annual Vestry and Parochial General Meetings.

 

Simmons, Roy                                                                                                                     46

Roy was born in Bristol about December 1926 to Albert and Victoria Simmons (nee Waters), who had married in Willesden in London about September 1921.  His brother Kenneth was also born in Bristol about March 1929.  His father had previously served in France with the Royal Fusiliers from about 1916 and later transferred to the East Surrey Regiment presumably after being wounded in an earlier battle.  According to the Hall Mark, Roy was called up by the Royal Marines some time after September 1944.  After the war, Roy met and married Mary Fear in Bristol about March 1953 and their sons Roy and Martin were born there about September 1955 and September 1962 respectively.

 

Skinner, Denis                                                                                                             19, 58

Denis was born in Bristol about December 1921 to Harry and Lucy Skinner (nee Wright), who had married there about June 1920.  His brother Peter was also born in Bristol in about June 1923.  Denis was called up quite early and was serving in the Middle East by September 1942, eventually returning home in about September 1945.  Once back home he was immediately on the Rev Hall’s doorstep to arrange his wedding to Pat Malone (see above), which took place the same month.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Skyrme, Dennis                                                                                                             43, 62

Dennis was born in Bristol about September 1917 to Wallace Henry and Melinda Kate Skyrme (nee Chinn), who had married there about December 1908.  In 1911 his parents were living at 28 Manor Road in Bishopston, together with his eldest brother Leslie who was born about October 1910.  His father was working as a taxi driver at this time and later enlisted in the RASC about 1916.  He remained on Home Service as a lorry driver until the end of the war.  His youngest son (Eric – see below) was born after the war in about June 1920. According to the Hall Mark, Dennis had been called up by the Army some time after Easter 1944 and by March 1946 was still on Home Service, having recently married Doris Owen the previous December.  After the war they continued to live in Bristol and had 2 children – Jean and Graham – born about March 1947 and September 1953 respectively.

 

Skyrme, Eric                                                                                                                        25

The brother of Dennis (see above), he was born in Bristol about June 1920.  According to the Hall Mark he had been posted to the Middle East by March 1943.  After the war he met and married Eileen Smith in Bristol about September 1947 and their son Steven was born there about June 1952.

 

Small, Colin                                                                                                                        41

He was a former choir member and one of the “rascals” of the old days when the Rev Hall first came to St Michael & All Angels Church.  Colin was born in Bristol about June 1914 but I have not been able to trace his parents or any brothers or sisters, although we do know that his mother’s maiden name was McGregor.  The Hall Mark does not record any details of his war service, although the records show that he married Violet Chandler in Bristol about December 1939 shortly after the Second World War broke out.  Their son Anthony was born about September the following year and their daughters Susan and Lynn were born after the war in about September 1947 and September 1950 respectively.

 

Smith, Basil                                                                                                                         34

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Basil was born in Bristol about December 1923 and that his mother’s maiden name was Christopher.  He had 8 brothers and sisters – Christopher, Florence, Donald, Claude, Roy, Gerald, Graham and Ralph – who were born in Bristol about June 1916, December 1917, September 1919, December 1921, June 1925, March 1928, December 1932 and December 1934 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Basil was called up by the Army and was serving as a Lieutenant in the RAOC by January 1944.  After the war he met and married Rosina Ackerman in Bristol about September 1953 and their son Graham was born there about September 1954.

 

Smith, Harry                                                                                                   18, 40, 45, 53

Harry was born in Bristol about March 1919 to Robert and Mabel Smith (nee Moore), who had married there in about June 1914.  His older sister Caroline was also born in Bristol about June 1915 and was followed by Mary in about September 1917 and Alan in September 1931.  The family lived in Bishopston and Harry sang in the choir at St Michael & All Angel’s Church.  He later met and married Kathleen Lang in Bristol about September 1941.  According the Hall Mark, he was called up quite early and was serving with the Army in India by September 1942.  He was eventually promoted to the rank of Sergeant and by September 1944 had been wounded in Italy.  He was at home hobbling about on crutches by February 1945 and was eventually invalided out the following July.  Shortly after this, he and his wife moved to Hendon in Buckinghamshire where their sons Christopher and Bernard were born about December 1945 and September 1947.

 

Smith, Newton                                                                                                                       8

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records shown that Newton was born in Bristol about March 1919 and that his mother’s maiden name was Pearce.  His sister Rosaline was also born in Bristol about December 1927.  He was called up quite early and was serving with the BEF in France by May 1940.  He was slightly wounded at Dunkirk but was safely back home by September.  After the war he met and married Gillian Morgan in Bristol about March 1950 but appear not to have had any children.

 

Smith, Roland                                                                                                                      46

Roland was born in Bristol about December 1924 to Isaac and Florence Smith (nee Thompson), who had married there about July 1921.  His older sister Margaret was also born in Bristol about March 1923 and he was followed by Mary, Royston and Rose in about September 1926, March 1928 and September 1935 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Roland was called up by the Army some time after September 1944 and does not appear to have married after he finished his National Service.

 

Spearing, Raymond                                                                                                       30, 60

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that he was born in Bristol about December 1918 and that his mother’s maiden name was Burrows.  According to the Hall Mark, he met and married Lily Coulson in Bristol about June 1943.  He was called up shortly thereafter and by March 1946 had been added to the list of those who had been demobilized since V E Day. Their daughter Valerie was later born in Bristol about September 1948.

 

Spencer, Vic                                                                                                15, 17, 30, 47, 62

Vic was born in Bristol about March 1917 to Nelson and Ada Spencer (nee Isaacs), who had married there about September 1915.  In 1911 his father was living at 4 Bond Street in the St James area of Bristol and was assisting his father in the family business making billiard tables.  His future wife (Ada) meanwhile was living with her widowed mother at 16 Vine Row in the St Michaels area of Bristol and working as a tailoress.  Vic’s sister Margaret followed about a year later in about December 1918.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church between the wars and Vic later became a member of the Bible Class.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving with the armed forces in 1941 and had a serious accident in about February 1942 but was recovering well and feeling much better by the following September.  However, he was still suffering from eye problems and had been invalided out by September 1943.  By February 1945 he had become engaged to Sydney Bradford and they were married at St Michael & All Angels Church about March 1946.  After the war their daughter Carol was born in Bristol about March 1947.

 

Spiller, James                                                                                                                      28

He was a Stoker in the Royal Navy and after surviving the sinking of HMS Prince of Wales off the Malayan Coast on the 10th of December 1941, died of Malaria in Ceylon on the 5th of June 1942 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Spreadbury, Raymond                                                                                                                    30

Raymond was born in Steyning in Hampshire about September 1920 to Albert and Christabel Spreadbury (nee Bishop), who had married there in about January of that year.  They later moved to Brighton where his brother Barrington was born about June 1932.  In 1911 his father had been living with his parents at 9 Ceylon Place in Eastbourne where he worked as a motor vehicle driver.  During the First World War he served in France with the mechanised branch of the RASC from the 16th of July 1915, until he was discharged on health grounds on the 8th July 1918.   During the 1930s the family moved to Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Raymond was called up during the early years of the war and was serving in the Middle East from about September 1943.  After the war he met and married Brenda Gallop in Bristol about April 1948 and their daughter Jacqueline was born there the following December.  Their son Clive followed later in about December 1951.

 

Squire, Beryl                                                                                                           22, 26, 28

She had been called up by the ATS during the early years of the war but died of TB on the 17th of March 1943 aged 21 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Squire, Raymond                                                                                                     38, 41, 53

Raymond was born in Bristol about March 1916 to Albert Richard and Amy Florence Squire (nee Wright), who had married in Bristol about 1915.  His sister Beryl (see above) was also born in Bristol on the 19th of February 1922.  His father was also born in Bristol about 1887 and in 1901 was a boarder at QEH public school.  On the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Honourable Artillery Company – a Territorial Unit based in London – and served with them in France and Italy from about October 1916.  Between the wars the family moved to Bishopston where they attended St Michael & All Angels Church.  During the 1940s his parents were living at 34 West Broadway in Bishopston but later moved to Westbury on Trym.  Raymond joined a signals unit of the Royal Artillery shortly after war was declared and was still on Home Service in March 1944, having just been commissioned.  By July 1945 he had been posted overseas and was serving with SEAC in Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

 

Prior to this he had met and married Ellen Rowland in Holsworthy in Devon in about March 1941 and their son Martin was born in Oakhampton the following December.  The family remained in Oakhampton after the war and their daughter Helen was born there in about June 1947.  Sadly Ellen and Raymond separated shortly after this and he remarried to Hilda Bleaney (nee Roden) in Chelsea in London about September 1949.  She had been previously married to Walter Bleaney in Pershore in Worcestershire about April 1943 and their son Ivor had been born in Coventry in January the following year.  Hilda and Raymond settled in Lewisham in London where their son Peter was born in about March 1951 but later moved back to Pershore when Raymond eventually died in about January 1999 aged 82.

 

Staite, Peter                                                                                                                        34

Peter was born in Bristol about December 1922 the only son of Alfred and Eliza Staite (nee Puddy), who had married in Cheltenham about July 1918.  His father served in France with the Kings Royal Rifle Corps from the 9th of May 1915 and saw action at the battles of Hooge, Bellewaarde, Delville Wood, Flers Courcelette, the Scarpe, Langemarck and Passchendaele.  In March 1918 his unit – the 14th (Light) Division – was overrun at St Quentin on the Somme losing all its guns and 6,000 men.  His Battalion was reduced to a cadre and returned to England to be built up again before returning for the final advance in Flanders.  It was during this short interval at home that Alfred found time to marry Eliza Puddy in Cheltenham about July 1918 before returning to France.  After the war they settled in Bishopston and Peter later became a keen member of the 61st Bristol Scout Group.  He also attended many of Bishop Vining’s Isle of Wight camps.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Army and was serving in North Africa by January 1944.  After the war he met and married Wendy Howells in Bristol about June 1950 and their daughter Susan was born there about December 1954 followed by their son Richard in about June 1960.

 

Stancomb, Jack                                                                                                                   34

John Mortimer Damien Stancomb was born in Bristol about June 1889 to William Mortimer and Clara Elizabeth Stancomb (nee Jones), who had married there about June 1884.  His older sister Kathleen was also born in Bristol in about 1886.  In 1901 they were living at 2 South Road in Clifton and his father was working as a commercial clerk at this time.  They also had an Arthur Pocock (aged 26) boarding with them who was a traveler for the Oil Mills Company, while they also had a domestic servant (Ethel Smith aged 15) also living in residence.  According to the Hall Mark, Jack was a member of St Michael & All Angels Church Choir with Harry Wookey (see below) in the days before the First World War, when they used to play ghosts in their cassocks.  By 1911 his parents were living at 3 South Road in Redland and Jack was a student at Cambridge.  He was commissioned quite early in the war and enlisted Somerset Light Infantry but his poor health meant that he was posted to the 11th Battalion, which was reserved for home service only.  However the manpower crisis in the spring of 1918 saw them moved to France on the 6th of May, where they were used to rebuild the 177th Brigade of the 59th (2nd North Midland) Division which had been reduced to cadre strength by the earlier battles on the Somme and the Lys.

 

Having advanced to the rank of Captain by this time, he would have seen action at the battle of Albert (21-22 August) and the advance in Artois and Flanders (2nd October – 11th November).  As a second line unit they were used primarily to follow up the attacking formations and consolidate the ground taken, although the Battalion was used to capture Lille on the 23rd October.  Shortly before the end of the war Jack was transferred to the 3/4th Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment which had been sent to Ireland on garrison duty the previous April.  After the war he was working for the Union Bank in Dursley in Gloucestershire in April but later returned to continued to Bishopston where he eventually met and married Mabel Wicks in about March 1939.

 

Stapley, Desmond                                                                                                         19, 38

Desmond was born in Bristol about September 1921 to Edward and Lilian Stapley (nee McCallum), who had married there about September 1918.  His brother younger Trevor followed in about September 1923.  According to the Hall Mark, Desmond was called up by the REME during the early years of the war.  He was on Home Service by September 1942 and was still in England by March 1944.  After the war he met and married Ethel Burslem in Bathavon about June 1955 and their son Anthony was born in Bristol about June 1958.

 

Stevens, Mary                                                                                                                    34

Wrongly described as Marjorie Stevens in the Hall Mark, Mary was born in Bristol about March 1926 to Charles Joseph and Gwendoline Stevens (nee Wills), who had married there about December 1921.  Her brother Victor was also born in Bristol about March 1923 as were her sisters Joan and Betty who were born about December 1924 and March 1928 respectively.  Her father enlisted with the 2/1st Battalion of the Berkshire Yeomanry in April 1916 – this had been converted to a Cyclists Battalion but remained on Home Service throughout the war.  However in April 1918 he was transferred to the 1/4 Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment which saw heavy fighting at Estaires, Hazebrouck and the Aisne and had been reduced to Cadre strength by July 1918.  Slightly wounded in June he was transferred to the 2nd Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment and saw further action in the fighting on the Selle and Sambre before finishing the war at Harvay in France.  According to the Hall Mark, Mary had become engaged to Dave Gibson about January 1944 and the wedding duly took place in Bristol about June 1944.  They later had 2 children – Wendy and Christopher – who were both born in Bristol about December 1948 and June 1954 respectively.

 

Stevens, Gordon                                                                                                                  18

Gordon and his twin brother Leslie were born in Bristol about September 1913, the eldest sons of Charles and Gwendoline Stevens (nee Williams), who had married there about December 1911.  Before they married, his father had lived in the St George area of Bristol where he worked as sewing machine mechanic, while his mother lived in Knowle and worked in a dress making factory.  They later had 2 more sons (William and Edward ) who were born in Bristol about September 1915 and March 1918 respectively, and 3 daughters (Mary, Evelyn and Ann) who were born about March 1920, March 1921 and June 1934.  According to the Hall Mark, Gordon was called up by the Royal Navy during the early months of the Second World War and was serving at sea by September 1942.  After the war he moved to Yeovil in Somerset where he met and married Esther Marks about September 1946 and their sons Richard and Anthony were born there about March 1948 and September 1956 respectively.

 

Stevens, Kenneth                                                                                                                 19 Kenneth was born in Bristol about September 1918 the only son of Edwin and Elsie Stevens (nee Joyner), who had married there in about March 1917.  His father had served with the 6th Battalion of the Somerset Light Infantry during the First World War.  He went out on the 1st of March 1915 and would have seen action at Hooge, Bellewaarde, Delville Wood, Flers Courcelette, the Scarpe and Langemarck before being invalided out on the 3rd of October 1917.  According to the Hall Mark, Kenneth was called up by the Royal Navy during the early months of the Second World War and was stationed in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) by September 1942.  Shortly before this he had met and married Ethel Perrott in Bristol in about March 1942 and after the war their children Shereen and Kelvin were born there about September 1948 and September 1950 respectively.

 

Stinson, Edward                                                                                                        6, 12, 28

Brother of William and Ronald (see below), he was a Writer with the Royal Navy and was killed in a railway accident near Taunton on the 4th of November 1940 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Stinson, Ronald                                                                                                             19, 60

Ron was born at Ashby de la Zouch in Leicestershire about March 1923 to George Horace and Amy Ellen Stinson (nee Hudson), who had married in Bristol in about June 1912.  His father was born in Whitwick in Leicestershire the son of a tallow chandler, while his mother was born in Bristol the daughter of a Departmental Manager in a Leather Warehouse.  In 1901 his mother was living in Easton where she was working as a schoolteacher.  In 1911 his father was living with his parents at Sharpley House in Whitwick and was managing his own mineral water manufacturing business.  His mother meanwhile was boarding at The Brackens in Whitwick, where she was working as an assistant teacher in the local elementary school.

 

Ron was the youngest of three brothers.  His eldest brother William had also been born Ashby de la Zouch in about June 1913 and his other brother Edward was born there about September 1918.  At some point after Ron was born the family moved to Bristol, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  In June 1936 his mother was responsible for maintaining the Electoral Roll and by 1939 they were living at 106 Chesterfield Road in St Andrews.  During the early years of the war Ron helped Sylvia Hall run her father’s Gents Outfitters on the Gloucester Road, while he was serving with the Auxiliary Fire Service.  He was a great friend of the family and he refused to take any payment for the work he did during this difficult time.

 

He was eventually called up and was serving in Gibraltar by September 1942 and by March 1946 had been added to the list of those who had been demobilised since VE Day.  He does not appear to have married but continued to support St Michael & All Angels Church for many years and in 1962 he was still living at 106 Chesterfield Road and had taken over responsibility for maintaining the Electoral Roll at this time.  He remained a close friend of the Warburton, Loxton and Cooper families and later moved to Woodland Grove in the Coombe Dingle area of Bristol where he subsequently died about April 1997.

 

Stinson, William                                                                                                19, 38, 40, 60

A former scout and brother of Edward and Ron (see above), he was born in Ashby de la Zouch about June 1913.  According to the Hall Mark he was called up by the Army quite early on and was serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  He had returned home by February 1944 in time to get married at St Christopher’s Church in Brislington.   Unfortunately I have not been able to trace the name of his bride or whether they had any children.  He was back in action on D Day and by September 1944 he was back home after being wounded in France.  By March 1946 he had been included on the list of those who had been demobilised since V E Day.  He remained in Bristol for many years until his first wife died but eventually moved to Gloucester where he met and married Vera Robinson in about December 1977.  He eventually died there in about April 1996, aged 83.

 

Stirratt, Basil                                                                                                           29, 45, 52

Basil was born in Bristol about June 1923 to Robert and Dorothy Stirratt (nee Hauser), who had married in Axbridge in Somerset about September 1920.  He had three other brothers – Sidney, Peter and Anthony – who were also born in Bristol about September 1921, September 1924 and December 1933 respectively.  His father had served with the Royal Artillery from about 1916 and after the war he and his wife settled in Bishopston where Basil later became a keen member of the 61st Bristol Scout Troop.  He was called up by the Army some time after Easter 1943 and by February 1945 was at home on embarkation leave.  By July he had met up with Ken Fisher in Cairo from where, in his words, he had “been dodging about the Dodecanese” in the Adriatic.  [Note: he was probably with one of the RASC Motor Boat Companies operating with the CMF, responsible for delivering stores of all kinds to destinations all round the Adriatic in 1944/45].  After the war he met and married Pamela Beavis in Bristol about September 1952 and they had three daughters – Carol, Jane and Nicola – who were born about September 1953, June 1955 and June 1961 respectively.

 

Stirratt, Peter                                                                                   17, 29, 38, 41, 52, 59, 62

Brother of Basil and Sidney, he was born in Bristol about September 1924.  Like Basil he was a former scout and according to the Hall Mark he was at home helping with the Isle of Wight camp in September 1942, where the boys ran his pyjamas up the flag pole thinking they belonged to the Rev Hall.  He was called up by the Army after Easter 1943, together with his brother Basil, and by March 1944 was training in an OCTU unit.  He had obtained a commission by the following September and by July 1945 was serving with the Paratroops in India.  By March 1946 he had been to Malaya but was back in India again, having had to do a rather nasty job in support of the Civil Authority in Karachi.  After completing his National Service he returned to Bristol where he met and married Ruth Swain in about March 1953 and their daughters – Jennifer and Josephine – were later born there about March 1957 and December 1958 respectively.

 

Stirratt, Sidney                                                                                       38, 47, 56, 60

Brother of Basil and Peter, he was born in Bristol about September 1921.  According to the Hall Mark he was training as a Glider Pilot with the Airborne Division in March 1944.  Home on leave in December 1944 he managed to persuade the Rev Hall to preside at his wedding to Betty Gerrard before returning to the war in Europe.  After serving through the campaign in North West Europe he was serving in Palestine by November 1945 and was with Brian Mees (see above) for the Christmas Eve Service in Bethlehem that year.  After the war he and Betty lived in Longmead Avenue, where their daughter Teressa was born about June 1949.  A keen sportsman he was a member of Bishopston Cricket Club for many years.  After Betty died in about March 1983 he later remarried to Jennifer Clark in Bristol about July 1987.

 

Stirratt, “Snowball”                                                                                                            47

This was Sidney Stirratt and by February 1945 was included in the list of persons recently married by the Rev Hall.

 

Stock, Jill                                                                                                                       29, 57

Although I have not been able to trace her family history, according to the Hall Mark she was called up by the Women’s Services some time after Easter 1943 and had been demobilised by November 1945.

 

Stock, Len                                                                                                                38, 60, 62

Len was born in Bristol about June 1919 the only son of Thomas Edward and Elsie May Stock (nee Pow), who had married there about June 1910.  In 1911 his parents were boarding at 26 Brighton Street in St Pauls, where his father was working as a clerk for a fruit and potato merchant. In addition to Len, they also had 3 daughters – Hilda, Elsie and Muriel – who were born in about March 1911, June 1912 and December 1913 respectively.  His father enlisted with the 11th Battalion of the Cheshire Regiment in 1914 and went to France with them on the 29th of September 1915.  This unit saw considerable action at the battles of the Somme, Messines, Third Ypres and the German offensives on the Somme, Lys and Aisne rivers in 1918.  By end of May 1918 they had been reduced to a cadre and were absorbed by the 1/6th Cheshires and took part in the final advance in Flanders over October and November.

 

After his father returned home in May 1919 the family moved to Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & all Angels Church and Len later became a keen member of the Bible Class.  According to the Hall Mark he joined the RAF shortly after war was declared and had been on Home Service with a Mobile Balloon Unit for several years by March 1944.  Prior to this he had married Betty Burt in Bristol about June 1942.  By March 1946 he had been included on the list of those who had been demobilised since VE Day and his wife had just given birth to their son Brian.  After the war his mother Elsie died and his father later remarried to her sister Alice Pow in about June 1947.  Shortly after this Len’s daughter Janet was born the following December.

 

Storkey, Ken                                                                                                                  41, 45

Ken was born in Bristol about June 1916 the eldest son of Frank and Elsie Storkey (nee Farrant), who had married there about September 1911.  Prior to this his father was living with his parents at 17 Eldon Road in the St Agnes area of Bristol and working as a clerk in a leather warehouse, while Ken’s grandfather was a cabinet maker.  His mother lived at 22 Tudor Road off Ashley Hill, together with her widowed mother and brother and 2 younger sisters.  She was working as a machinist in a boot factory at this time, while her mother worked as a housekeeper.  Frank later served in France with the Somerset Light Infantry from about 1917.

 

Ken’s younger brother Lionel was also born in Bristol about March 1922 and his sister Jean followed in about June 1928.  The family was also related to Ken Evans (see above) through their aunt Ellen Eliza Storkey, who had married Frederick Sidney Evans in 1923.  According to the Hall Mark, Ken was called up by the Army and was serving in France with the BLA by September 1944.  Prior to this he had met and married Sybil Foakes in Salisbury about June 1943.  However he was back at home in Bristol by February 1945, having been badly wounded near the Albert Canal in Belgium.  After the war his daughter Elizabeth was born in Bristol about September 1949.  He remained in Bristol for the rest of his life eventually dying at the relatively young age of 46 in about December 1962.

 

Storkey, Peter                                                                                  19, 25, 30, 34, 41, 46

Although I have not been able to trace his early family history, the Hall Mark notes that Peter was serving with the 8th Army in the Middle East by September 1942.  He had met

Vincent Castle in Benghazi by March 1943 and by September 1943 was trying to catch up with Alfred West in North Africa and finally met up with him in a YMCA canteen in Tunis at the end of the year.  By September 1944 he was based Corsica and by February 1945 was back home and playing rugby for Bristol.  Peter later married Hilda Muriel Davies (nee Tyler) in Bristol about June 1946 and their daughter Susan was born there about September 1947 followed by their son David in December 1949.  According to Muriel’s obituary they had several other children before Peter died, although sadly one of his daughters later died of cancer.  I have not been able to determine when or where Peter died but Muriel later remarried to Harry Freeman in Birmingham about June 1960 and returned with him to Bishopston.  They attended for many years at the Church of the Good Shepherd and supported the many church social events, including the Whist Drives and Lunch Club.  After Harry died Muriel continued to live a very active life being fond of many sports, particularly tennis and badminton.  She was a member of the Bristol Tennis League for 35 years before finally giving up the game at the age of 85.  She eventually died on the 25th of September 2010 aged 91.

 

Street, Peggy                                                                                                                       25

Peggy was born in Bristol about September 1922 the only child of Victor and Alys Street (nee Roberts), who had married there about December 1917. According to the Hall Mark, Peggy had been called up by the WRNS by March 1943.  She does not appear to have married after the war ended.

 

Summerell, Ron                                                                                                 18, 31, 35, 60

Ron was born in Bristol about December 1917 to Arnold and Lucy Summerell (nee Blackmore), who had married there about December 1916.  His 3 brothers – John, Ken and Dennis – were also born in Bristol in about September 1920, June 1928 and December 1930 respectively.  According to the Hall Mark, Ron was called up by the Royal Navy and serving at sea by September 1942.  By September 1943 he had become engaged to a lady from South Africa and they were married by the following January, although unfortunately I have not been able to trace the name of his wife or whether they had any children.  By March 1946 he had been added to the list of those who had been demobilised since V E Day.

 

Sunday School,                                          6, 9, 11, 21, 25, 29, 42, 46, 48, 49, 51, 57, 61

With several hundred children attending Sunday School, it is not surprising that the Rev Hall gives considerable prominence to their activities in the church newsletters.  By March 1940 several Sunday School Teachers had been called up and 16 (mostly young) volunteers had taken their place.  After being evicted from the Parish Halls by the Army they operated from Bishop Road School for the rest of the war and continued with the usual round of teaching, Christmas Parties, Pantomimes, summer outings and awards of Richard’s Prizes until normal service was resumed at the Parish Halls in March 1946.  By this time of course many of the young men and women were returning from the war and the Rev Hall had already urged them, in a letter written immediately after V E Day, to consider the Sunday School as a possible outlet for their energies, as he felt that the children in particular had suffered as a result of the war.

 

Symonds, Stanley                                                                                                                18

Stanley was born in Bristol about November 1910 to Rupert Henry James and Clara Symonds (nee West), who had married in Bristol about December 1900.  In 1911 he was living with his parents at 11 Charles Street in Easton, together with his brother William and sister Ruby aged 5 and 3 respectively.  His father was working as a boot and shoe finisher in a footwear factory at this time.  His younger brothers Albert, Sidney and Edward were also born in Bristol about September 1912, March 1914 and June 1915 respectively.  Stanley later moved to Bishopston where he met and married Amy Hutchings in about June 1934 and their daughter Margaret was born about December 1937.  According to the Hall Mark, he was called up by the Royal Navy early in the war and was serving at sea by September 1942.

 

Symons, Bert                                                                                                                       45

Herbert (known as Bert) was born in Bristol about June 1916 to Henry Herbert and Gertrude Olive Symons (nee Withey), who had married there about October 1915.  He had eight brothers and one sister – Maury, John, Reginald, Denis, Donald, Bettie, Royston, Raymond, and Colston who were also born in Bristol about March 1918, June 1919, March 1921, July 1922, March 1924, June 1925, September 1926, March 1928 and March 1929 respectively.  His father had worked as a furnace operator and served with the 3rd Volunteer Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment before the First World War.  However, he enlisted in the RAMC on the 31st of January 1915 and was immediately posted to the Southern General Hospital and served there until the end of the war.  He was discharged on the 31st of March 1920 suffering from rheumatic arthritis and was assessed as 50% disabled, for which was awarded a weekly pension of 13/9d.

 

The family were living at 30 Victoria Place, off Spring Street in Bedminster at this time but later moved to 8 Southville Place in Southville where Bert’s father eventually died on 9th of January 1934, leaving some £390 to his wife and dependants.  Gertrude then moved to the Bishopston area of Bristol, where the family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Bert and his brother Donald (see below) were both called up by the Army and were serving with the BLA in Germany by February 1945.  After the war Bert moved to Bath where he met and married Iris Chave in Bathavon about June 1948.  They later had two daughters – Mary and Sally – who were born in Bath about June 1949 and September 1953 respectively.

 

Symons, Donald                                                                                                            45, 46

Brother of Bert (see above), he was also born in Bristol about March 1924.  According to the Hall Mark they were both serving with the BLA in Germany by February 1945, although Donald had only been called up the previous September.  After the war Donald moved to Holderness in East Yorkshire where he met and married Betty Fifield about December 1952.  They later had two boys – David and John – who were born in Holderness about June 1954 and March 1959 respectively.

T

Taylor, David                                                                                                                      18

David was born in Bristol about September 1923 to Ernest and Irene Taylor (nee Heath), who had married there about December 1920.  His sister Muriel followed a few years later in about September 1926.  According to the Hall Mark, David was serving at sea with the Merchant Navy by September 1942.  After the war he met and married Eileen Fahey in Bristol about March 1947 and they had 3 children – Mary, Helen and Peter – who were born about June 1948, December 1952 and December 1959 respectively.

 

Taylor, Frank                                                                                                                      41

Frank was born in Bristol about December 1921 to William and Elizabeth Taylor (nee Wheeler), who had married in Dorchester about June 1915.  His older brother Ronald was also born in Bristol about June 1920.  According to the Hall Mark, Frank was called up by the Army and was serving in France with the BLA by September 1944.  After the war he met and married Violet Baggs in Bristol about March 1953 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Taylor, Richmond                                                                                                               45

Richmond was born in Thornbury about March 1918 to Enos and Frances Taylor (nee Edwards), who had married in Westbury on Severn about January 1917.  His father had joined the 1/6 Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment during the First World War which had been attached to the Mounted Division in 1914 but later converted to a Cyclists Battalion.  He never served overseas but was posted with the rest of his Battalion to Tralee in Ireland in early 1918 and then to Limerick in August where he finished the war.  Richmond’s brother Harry was born in Bristol about March 1917 and his sister Olive was also born in Thornbury about December 1925.  Some time after this the family moved to Bishopston where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Richmond was called up during the war and was serving in Italy by February 1945.  Shortly before being posted overseas he had met and married Clarice Vincent in Bristol about September 1942 and they later had three daughters – Carol, Linda and Shiela – who were born in Bristol about June 1946, December 1948 and March 1953 respectively.

 

Thomas, “Bill”                                                                                                                   56

Bill was born in Bristol about March 1926, the only son of Ernest and Nellie Thomas (nee Fry), who had married there about December 1920.  According to the Hall Mark, Bill was called up by the Army about 1944 and had been awarded the Military Medal by November 1945.  I have not been able to clearly identify whether he married or if he had any children after the war.

 

Thomas, Mostyn                                                                                                                  46

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he had been called up by the Royal Navy by February 1945.

 

Thomas, Pamela                                                                                                                 23

Pamela was born in Bristol about June 1920 to Harold and Violet Mary Thomas (nee McPherson), who had married there about September 1912.  Prior to this her father had lived with his parents at 195 Cheltenham Road in Montpelier, where he worked as a checker in a tobacco warehouse.  Her mother lived at Canynge Road in Clifton at this time, where her father was the Secretary of Clifton College.  Her older brother Harold and sister Margaret were also born in Bristol about June 1914 and December 1915 respectively.  Her father was a pre war Territorial and served in France with the North Somerset Yeomanry from the 15th of December 1915, where he served mainly in line holding operations but later saw mounted action at the battle of Arras in 1917 and at St Quentin, the Avre, Amiens, Cambrai, the Selle and the final advance in Flanders in 1918.  After the war the family settled in Bishopston and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Pamela had been called up by the WAAF by January 1943.  After the war she met and married Gordon Fanson in Bristol about December 1952 and they later had 3 boys – David, Kenneth and Peter – who were born about December 1954, June 1957 and December 1958 respectively.

 

Thompson, Peter                                                                                                                 34

Peter was born in Bristol the eldest son of George and Beatrice Thompson (nee Matthews), who had married in Exeter about March 1920.  He had 4 brothers and sisters – William, Lillian, Arthur and Rosemary – who were born in Bristol about June 1923, March 1925, September 1927 and June 1931 respectively.  The family settled in Bishopston between the wars and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Peter was called up by the Army and was serving in India by January 1944.  After the war he met and married Marjorie Weymouth in Bristol about September 1948 but later moved to Wells in Somerset, where his eldest daughter Sarah was born about March 1952.  Some time after this they moved to Plymouth where his son Mark was born about March 1966 followed by his second daughter Tracey in about June 1968.

 

Tiley, Margaret                                                                                                                   22

Margaret was born in Bristol about September 1917 to Reginald and Hilda Tiley (nee Bailey), who had married there about September 1916.  Her brother Peter (see below) was also born in Bristol about March 1921 and was followed by her sister Pamela in about June 1924.  The family settled in Bishopston where Margaret became a keen member of the local Guides.  Although crippled by Polio as a child, she led a very active life and was running the Guides with Jean Wicks (see below) in January 1943.  She continued to be active in the Guide movement after the war and also served the Church for many years as Parish Secretary.  Her sister Pamela married Maurice Rich in Bristol after the war in about December 1945 and their son Christopher was born there about December 1949.  They then moved to Weston Super Mare where their daughter Susan was born in about September 1956 but then moved back to Bristol, where their second daughter Sally was born about September 1959.  Although she never married herself, Margaret was a doting aunt to both Peter and Pamela’s children.  While her later years were clouded by failing joints, she remained independent almost to the end and was much loved by all.  She later died in a nursing home in Henleaze in August 2002 aged 85.

 

Tiley, Peter                                                                                            19, 30, 38, 44, 46, 47

Brother of Margaret (see above), he was born in Bristol about March 1921.  According to the Hall Mark he joined the RAF during the early years of the war and was undergoing flying training in Canada by September 1942.  By March 1944 he was still serving there as an Observer Instructor. By February 1945 he was back home, having been promoted to Flight Lieutenant, and was handing out prizes at the Sunday School Prize Giving.  He had also taken the opportunity to get married to a local girl while he was out in Canada, although I have not been able to trace her name or whether they had any children.

 

Tiley, the Rev                                                                                                                 12, 16

Although I have not been able to trace his family history, the Hall Mark notes that he was a former member of the Parish who had been ordained in St Michaels & All Angels Church before the war and was serving in a Parish in Birmingham in September 1941.

 

Tippetts, Mr (Junior)                                                                                                             6

Brian Tippetts was born in Bristol about March 1921 to Thomas Sparks and Maud Alice Tippetts (nee Shephard), who had married there about September 1913.  Prior to this his father was living with his parents at 34 Seymour Road in Bishopston, where he worked as a boot clicker for a local boot manufacturer.  His mother also lived in Bishopston and lived at home where she helped her mother while her father worked as a manager of a wholesale draper’s business. Brian had 2 older sisters Winifred and Joyce who were also born in Bristol about March 1917 and June 1919 respectively.  His younger brother Leonard was born about March 1923 and his youngest sister Margaret in about June 1925.  During the First World War his father served in the UK with the RAOC from the 11th of December 1915 until he was discharged on the 6th of December 1918.  After the war the family settled in Bishopston where Brian later became a member of the choir at St Michal & all Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Brian was serving with the RAF by March 1940.  After the war he later met and married Margaret Hope in Gosport in Hampshire about September 1958 and moved to Bathavon, where his daughter Lucinda was born about December 1961.

 

Tittle, Mervyn                                                                                                                12, 28

He was killed in action on the 27th of April 1941 while serving with the Royal Armoured Corps in Greece – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Tooze, Ronald                                                                                     6, 19, 30, 41, 45, 52

I have not been able to trace Ron’s family history but according to the Hall Mark Ronald’s parents lived in Bishopston during the inter war years, where he later became a keen member of the local 61st Bristol Scout troop and the Bible Class.  He was serving with the RAF by March 1940 and had been posted to the Middle East by September 1942.  He had transferred to a flying school in Rhodesia by September 1943 and by September 1944 had won his wings and was in serving in Italy.  By February 1945 he was in Greece and gave everyone a scare by going missing but fortunately turned up 2 days later.  By July 1945 he was back home on leave having completed his tour of duty.

 

Tovey, Ernest                                                                                                                      28

He was killed in action on the 21st of September 1941, when his ship the SS Lissa was sunk by a German Submarine while travelling home in a convoy from Gibraltar -see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Treglown, Gerald                                                                                                          53, 56

Gerald was born in Tones in Devon about December 1925, the only son of Percival and Ethel Treglown (nee Binmore) who had married there about September 1920.  His father had served with the Royal Engineers during the First World War and was posted to Egypt on the 12th of July 1915, from where he saw action in the Gallipoli and Palestine campaigns.  At some point during the inter war years the family moved to Bishopston where they attended at St Michael & all Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Gerald had been called up by the RAF by July 1945 and was training at a Flying School in Florida the following November.  After the war he met and married Jean Turner in Bristol about December 1950 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Tremlett, Kenneth Rainey                                                                                                    46

Kenneth was born in Bristol about June 1921 to William and Florence Tremlett (nee Besser), who had married there about September 1918.  His brother Ronald (see below) followed shortly after in about September 1923.  His father was a pre war Territorial who served in France with the Royal Engineers from the 22nd of December 1914 until he was discharged on the 19th of March 1919.  The family settled in Bishopston area between the wars and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark Kenneth had been called up by the Army by February 1945.  Shortly before this he had married his girlfriend Sylvia Scriven in Bristol about January 1945 and their daughter Patricia was later born there in about March 1952.  After the war he remained very much involved with the running of St Michael and All Angels until his death in about June 1978. He was survived by his wife Sylvia who now lives in North Wales.

 

Tremlett, Ronald                                                                                                                 46

Brother of Kenneth (see above), he was born in Bristol about September 1923.  According to the Hall Mark he had, like his brother, been called up by February 1945 although he went to the Navy rather than the Army.  He later married his girlfriend Ivy Edwards in Bristol in about June 1945 and their daughter Christine was later born there about September 1950.

 

Trenchard, Alan                                                                                                            46, 56

Maurice Alan Trenchard was born in Bristol about June 1927 to Henry Albert and Rose Trenchard (nee Nicholls), who had married there about September 1915.  In 1911       his father was living in Weston super Mare where he worked as a hotel car man.   His mother meanwhile was living at Barton Hill in Bristol, where she worked as a caramel maker in a chocolate factory.  His parents met and married during the war and his eldest sister Marjorie was born in Bristol about December 1916 and was followed by his brother Raymond (see below) in about September 1925.  His youngest sister Patricia was also born in Bristol in about March 1930.  According to the Hall Mark, Alan had been called up by the Royal Navy by February 1945 and was serving at sea as a Stoker 1st Class by the following November.  After the war he met and married Eileen Blake in Bristol about March 1952 and shortly after this they migrated to Canada.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Trenchard, Raymond                                                                                              29, 33, 56

Older brother of Alan (see above), he was born in Bristol about September 1925.  According to the Hall Mark, he was called up by the Royal Navy some time after Easter 1943 and was awarded the Richard’s Prize the following January.  By November 1945 he was serving at a naval base in Ceylon.  After the war he met and married Joan Carter and they later moved to Poole in Dorset where they had two children – Jane and Simon – who were born about March 1956 and June 1960 respectively.

 

 

Trigg, Harold                                                                                                                      60

Although I have not been able to trace his family history, the records show that Harold was born in Bristol about March 1915 and that his mother’s maiden name was Connor.  His older brother Kenneth (see below) was also born in Bristol about June 1912.  The Hall Mark notes that Harold had been demobilised by March 1946 but is silent as to when he was called up, although given his age it is likely that this was quite early in the war.  After the war he met and married Winifred Harbord in Edmonton near London about March 1946 and later moved to Bishop Stortford, where they had two children – John and Hilary – who were born about December 1948 and March 1953 respectively.

 

Trigg, Kenneth                                                                                                  19, 42, 56, 60

Brother of Harold (see above), he was born in Bristol about June 1912.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving in the Middle East by September 1942 and was still there in September 1944.  He had returned home by November 1945 and had been added to the list of those demobilised since V E Day by March 1946.  After the war he moved to London where he met and married Sylvia Jordon in Camberwell in Surrey about June 1955.  They later moved to the London Borough of Wandsworth where they had two children – Cecilia and Miles who were born about June 1960 and June 1962 respectively.

 

Turner, Ralph                                                                                                                      18

Ralph was born in Plymouth about March 1924 to Edmund and Ada Turner (nee Janes), who had married at Kingsbridge in Devon about December 1921.  According to the Hall Mark, Ralph was called up by the Royal Navy and was serving at sea by September 1943.  After the war he met and married Jeanne Cummins in Bristol about June 1950.  They then moved to live at Cheltenham where their children Susan and John were born about September 1951 and December 1953 respectively.

 

Turnidge, Brian                                                                                                       22, 34, 40

A former scout and flying officer (Navigator) with the RAF, he was killed when his Halifax bomber crashed near Nottingham on the 6th of July 1944, having returned from a successful bombing mission against a flying bomb site at Croix Dalle in France – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

U

Underwood, Norman                                                                                                    46, 53

Norman was born in Bristol about March 1927 to Frederick and Florence Underwood (nee Major), who had married there about September 1921.  He had two older brothers – Frederick and Arthur who were also born in Bristol about December 1922 and December 1924 respectively – and a younger sister (Joyce) who was born about September 1929.  The family lived in the Bishopston area of Bristol between the wars and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where the children went to Sunday School.  According to the Hall Mark, Norman was called up by the Army some time after September 1944 and by July 1945 had won a certificate as the best recruit, a prize for the best rifle shot and came out top with 90% in PT for his Primary Training Course.  After he had completed his National Service he returned home and later met and married Margaret Simmons in Bristol about June 1953.  Their eldest sons John and Philip were born in Bristol about March 1954 and September 1956 respectively.  Some time after this the family moved to Weston Super Mare where the two younger boys – Christopher and Mark Thomas – were born about September 1960 and September 1968 respectively.

 

V

Vincent, Ralph                                                                                                                     25

Ralph was born in Bristol about September 1916 to Ralph Millsman and Alice Vincent (nee Webber), who had married there about September 1913.    In 1911 his father was living his parents at 26 Sommerville Road near St Andrews Park and was working as a corn merchant’s clerk.  His mother meanwhile was living with her widowed mother at 16 Raglan Road in Bishopston, where she worked as a milliner.  His father enlisted with the RASC during the First World War and went with them to France on the 12th of May 1915, where he served as a driver in the transport column.  However, by 1918 he was transferred to the North Staffordshire Regiment to make up the numbers caused by the looming manpower crisis and finished the war as an infantryman in the front line.

 

Between the wars Ralph’s parents settled in Bishopston and his brother Mervyn was born in about June 1923 and his sister Patricia followed much later in about September 1935.  According to the Hall Mark, Ralph was engaged to Phylis Gillard in March 1943 and they were duly married in about June 1943.  Their eldest daughters – Janthia and Valerie – were born in Bristol about December 1945 and December 1947 respectively.  Some time after this the family moved to Norton Radstock in Somerset, where their youngest daughter Diane was born about June 1958.

 

Vining, Bishop                                                                                       8, 14, 30, 42, 52, 57

Although I have not been able to trace his family history, local records record that he was Bishop of Lagos and a former colleague of the Rev Hall.  Many fond memories were recorded of the camps he organised on the Isle of Wight at the cost of £2 and 2 shillings.  These dated back to 1919 and before that when, as Canon Vining, he first started the idea at Alnmouth in Northumberland in 1911.  Both the Rev Hall and his brother were very active in organizing these camps.  According to the Hall Mark, the Bishop wrote a letter to the old campers in September 1940 offering his thoughts on the changes ahead.  By February 1942 he had written again remarking on the availability and size of eggs in Nigeria and by September 1943 had been visited by Alex Earl (see above).  By September 1944 he had been visited several times by Eric Morgan (see above) and by July 1945 was back in Bristol, from where he later took on the job of  Camp Chaplain at Brean Down the following September.

 

V E Day                                                                                                                              51

The victory over Germany was duly marked by 11 street parties, several bonfires and a marching jazz band.

 

Vowles, Alice                                                                                                                       26

Alicia Vowles was born in Bristol about June 1917 to Edgar and Amy Vowles (nee Parker), who had married there about September 1914.  Her older sister Dora (see below) was also born in Bristol about September 1915.  In 1911 her father Edgar was living in the St Georges area of Bristol, where he was working as an apprentice motor mechanic.  His mother was also living in St Georges at this time where she was employed in making cardboard boxes for a printing/stationery company.  Edgar was later called up during the First World War and served in France with the 3rd Hussars from latter half of 1917.  During this period he would have seen action at Cambrai, Bourlon Wood, the German Spring offensive on the Somme and Lys and the allied advance at Amiens, Albert and Bapaume, followed by the Battles for the Hindenburg Line, the pursuit to the Selle and the final advance in Picardy.

 

After the war the family settled in Bishopston, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Alice and her sister Dora were called up by the WAAF in about March 1943 and served with them for the rest of the war.  After the war she met and married Joseph Harrison in Kingswood about March 1953 and their son Daniel was born there the following March.  They then moved back to Bristol where their daughters Rhoda and Amy were born about September 1955 and March 1959 respectively.   After this they moved to Weston Super Mare where their youngest son Adrian was born about March 1964.

 

Vowles, Dora                                                                                                                      26

Sister of Alice (see above), Dora was born in Bristol about September 1915.  She was also called up by the WAAF at about the same time as her sister but does not appear to have married afterwards.

 

W

 

Wake, Peter                                                                                                                         25

Peter was born in Bristol about March 1921 to Harold and Ada Wake (nee Jackson), who had married there about October 1917.  His older brothers Harold and John were also born in Bristol about March 1918 and September 1919 respectively and his younger brother Robert followed in about June 1924.  His father served in France with the Rifle Brigade from the 27th of May 1915 until he was wounded on the 10th of September 1917.  During this time he would have seen action with the 14th (Light ) Division at Hooge, Bellewaarde, Delville Wood, Flers Courcelette, 1st and 3rd Scarpe and Langemark.  According to the Hall Mark, Peter was called up quite early during the Second World War and was serving in the Middle East by March 1943.  After the war he met and married Evelyn Crocker in Thornbury in about June 1954 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Walker John                                                                                                                        52

He was called up by the RAF and was killed in action on the 10th of March 1945, while carrying out an intruder operation in the Balkans – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Walker, Peter                                                                                                    34, 38, 52, 60

Peter was born in Bristol about March 1924 the only child of Percy and Alys Walker (nee Fay), who had married in Leominster in Herefordshire about March 1920.  They lived in Bishopston between the wars and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Peter was called up by the RAF about January 1944 and was training as a Sergeant Navigator at a Flying School in South Africa by the following March.  By July 1945 he was back home on leave and by March 1946 was serving in India.  After he had completed his National Service he met and married Marion Legg in Weston Super Mare about December 1949.  Some time after this they moved to Chippenham in Wiltshire where their daughters Angela and Lynne were born about September 1961 and March 1963 respectively.

Walker, Michael                                                                                                                  40

He was killed in action near Caen in France on the 26th of July, while serving with the 24th Hussars Armoured Cavalry Regiment – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Wallis, Alf                                                                                              19, 34, 46, 47, 54, 60

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Alf was born in Bristol about September 1920 and that his mother’s maiden name was Orr.  His brother Cliff (see below) was also born in Bristol about December 1924.  The family lived in Longmead Avenue in Bishopston before the war and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Alf later became a member of the Bible Class.  He joined the RAF shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War and was serving in the Middle East with the Ferry Command by September 1942.  He was in Central Africa by January 1944 but was back at home in time to read one of the lessons for the Carol Service the following Christmas Eve.  He was still back at home and handing out prizes to the Sunday School pupils by February 1945.  During his 3 years service abroad he claimed to have met 4 Padres, all of whom knew the Rev “Spider” Hall.  He married Dorothy Jones about June 1945 and by March 1946 had been added to the list of those demobilised since V E Day.  His daughter Linda was later born in Bristol about March 1952.

 

Wallis, Cliff                                                                                                        22, 34, 42, 60

Brother of Alf (see above), he was born in Bristol about December 1924.  According to the Hall Mark, he was called up about January 1943 and had arrived in North Africa by the following January.  By September 1944 he was serving in Gibraltar where he remained until he returned home on leave in about March 1946.  After the war he met and married Dorothy Skeplorn in Bristol about June 1951 and their son Jeffrey was born there in about June 1953.  Shortly after this they moved to Kingswood where their daughter Julia was born about June 1958.

 

Warburton, Geoff                                                                                                    35, 41, 46

Geoff was born in Bristol March 1925 to Frederick and Dorothy Warburton (nee Marsh), who had married there about December 1919.  His sister Margaret was also born in Bristol about December 1931.  His aunt Miss L M Warburton had worked on collecting for overseas missions since 1909 and was the Hon Secretary of the King’s Messenger Society in 1913.  She was living at 14 Lancashire Road in Bishopston at this time. By June 1936 she had taken over as Secretary for the Church Magazine, although by then she was living with Geoff’s father at 11 Mervyn Road (also in Bishopston).    According to the Hall Mark, Geoff was called up by the Army during the war and had married Vera Pain (see above) in St Michael & All Angels Church by January 1944.  He was serving in France with the BLA by the following September and his Battalion had such a hard time in the battle for Normandy that it was sent back to Caen to recuperate and was still there by February 1945, when Geoff came back home on leave.  After the war he and Vera had 2 boys – Philip and Roger – who were born in Bristol about June 1949 and September 1954 respectively.  He later became Churchwarden of St Michael & All Angels in 1962 when the Church was under the leadership of the Rev E D Cartwright.

 

Warburton, George                                                                                                 14, 41, 47

George was born in 1923, the only child of William Worthy and Ethel May Warburton (nee Tucker), who had married in Bristol in about September 1910.  In 1911 his parents were living at 13 St Leonard’s Road in Horfield and his father was working as a tailor’s foreman at this time.  His father later served in France with the Royal Garrison Artillery during the later years of the First World War.  When George was born they were living in Kent Road in Bishopston but later moved to Nottingham Road where he remained until he married Sylvia Hall – see above.  His grandfather was a builder (born in 1839) who built the houses in Melbourne Road and elsewhere in Bishopston, renting them out for 10 shillings a week.  Unfortunately none of this wealth came down to George as most of the property was virtually given away by his grandfather to meet his need for ready cash.  George was educated at Sefton Park and Bishop Road Primary Schools and then went to Bristol Grammar School, before starting his working life as a clerk for the National & Provincial Bank.  The family attended regularly at St Michael & All Angels Church, where George became a member of the Choir and Bible Class.

 

He was called up by the Army in February 1942 and was posted to the RAOC, rising to the rank of Corporal.  He went over to France on D Day (6th of June 1944) and helped to set up an ammunition dump to keep the troops on the front line properly supplied. He and his comrades were under constant artillery fire during this period, which did not let up until the Allies had broken through at Caen towards the end of July.  He then advanced with the rest of the BLA through Belgium and Holland and across the Rhine into Germany.  Shortly before the end of the war he was invalided home with TB and it was only after 2 years in hospital, and an operation to remove the infected lung, that he was able to return home and marry his sweetheart Sylvia Hall – see above for details of how they met and their subsequent life together.

 

On his return to Bristol George worked for the National & Provincial Bank for about a year before deciding to work alongside his father in law, James C Hall, selling menswear and school uniforms from his shop on the Gloucester Road and remained there for the rest of working life.  Despite his doctor’s prediction that he could only expect to live for another 20 years, he lived to enjoy his 60th (Diamond) Wedding Anniversary with Sylvia at 12 Lancashire Road n Bishopston before he eventually died in 2010.

 

Ware, Maxwell                                                                                                                    28

He was in the Merchant Navy serving aboard the Tanker M V Narragansett, when it was sunk by a German Submarine on the 25th of March 1942 killing all 49 crew – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Warn, John                                                                                                                    46, 60

John was born in Bristol about June 1926 the only child of Reginald and Medina Warn (nee Handford – see above), who had married there about March 1920.  His father served in France with the Royal Engineers from about the 30th September 1914 until he transferred to the RAF in about April 1918.  According to the Hall Mark, John was called up by the Royal Navy some time after September 1944 and by March 1946 had been added to the list of those demobilised since V E Day.  After the war he met and married Joan Tutcher in Bristol about September 1956 and their children Judith and Richard were born there about June 1958 and March 1961 respectively.

 

Warr, Stuart                                                                                                              6, 38, 53

Stuart was born in Taunton about December 1919 to Francis and Florence Evelyn Warr (nee Day), who had married there about September 1908.  His older brother Patrick was also born in Taunton about June 1918.  In 1911 his parents were living at 60 Albermarle Terrace in Taunton, where his father was working as a fitter for an engineering firm.  They also had a Charles Grimes boarding with them who was working as a household decorator at this time.  During the First World War his father enlisted in the 1/5th Battalion Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry Regiment, which was reassigned as a Pioneer Battalion for the 61st (2nd South Midland) Division and sent to France on the 20th of May 1916.  He would have spent much of his time helping to build and maintain the trench defences and other structures in the front line.  However, they were also used by the Division as reserve infantry and would have seen action at Fromelles, the Ancre, Langemarck, the German Spring Offensives on the Somme and the Lys and the battles that made up the final advance in Picardy.

 

He returned to his family in Taunton after the war but moved to Bishopston during the inter war years, where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church and Stuart later became a member of the choir.  According to the Hall Mark, Stuart was serving with the Royal Engineers in France by March 1940.  After he was evacuated from Dunkirk he remained on Home Service until March 1945 but was serving in Germany with the BLA by July 1945.  After the war he met and married Edith Morris (sister of Godfrey Morris – see above) in Bristol about September 1947 and their daughters Diana and Ann were born there about December 1948 and June 1952 respectively.

 

Warwick, Derek                                                                                                25, 42, 45, 60 his sister Eileen followed on the 30th January 1923.  His father was a carpenter/shop fitter and died quite young of brain tumour on the 6th of April 1935.  His mother remained a widow for many years before dying at the grand old age of 92 in November 1984. The family lived at 61 Bishop Road in Bishopston before the war and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Derek served as a chorister from 1929 -1935 and became a great friend of Paul Davis – see above.  Later he and Paul joined the Bible Class, which he attended from 1935 – 1940.  He was educated at Bishop Road and Bristol North Central schools and worked for the Bristol City Health Authority before the war.

 

After war was declared in 1939 he joined the Local Defence Volunteers (Home Guard) in 1940 and was later called up by the Army in August 1941.  He was posted as an office clerk in the RAOC in Leicester, moving later to Basingstoke, Bishop’s Castle and Shere before being posted overseas to Algiers in North Africa in November 1942.  He served with the 1st Army’s No 1 Base Ammunition Supply Depot where he met up with Laurie Gillard and Maurice Newport (see above).  He was called back home in March 1944 and from September served with XXX Corps in France, Holland and Germany.  By March 1946 he was back home on leave from the BAOR and was eventually demobilised in September 1946.

After the war Derek returned to his old job and was eventually transferred to Southmead Hospital when the National Health Service took over his area of work.  His sister Marjorie married Donald Anthony Case in 1947 and their daughter Adrienne was born the following year.  Derek himself eventually married Brenda Dorothy Hall on the 30th of April 1955 and their son Christopher Lance was born on the 27th of January 1956, although sadly he died without issue after committing suicide on the 15th of October 1991.  Derek remained in his job at Southmead until he took early retirement in 1984, living happily with his wife Brenda until she herself died a few years ago.  He is now living at Falloden Court in Henleaze, where he spends his time corresponding with old friends and keeping abreast of Bishopston matters.

 

Watson, Michael                                                                                                                  59

A noted guitar player, he was born about June 1923, the second son of Leslie and Lavina Watson (nee Carter).  His older brother Leslie was born about June 1920 and his sister Doreen followed in about June 1928.  Towards the end of the Second World War he was called up by the Royal Navy and later took part in the Relief of Hong Kong in March 1946.  After the war he moved to Norwich where he met and married Vera Howard about September 1958 and their children David and Jane were born there about March 1984 and September 1966 respectively.

 

Watts, Leonard John                                                                                               22, 35, 37

Leonard was born in Bristol in 1897 to Thomas and Emily Watts, the second youngest of 9 children (Thomas, Emmeline, Arthur, Charlotte, Mable, James, Martha and Ida) and in 1901 they were living at 101 Gloucester Road in Bishopston together with his uncle George Watts and his cousin William Cooper.   By 1911 they had moved to 2 Denmark Place (also in Bishopston).  His father was managing his own haulage business at this time, while his mother was working as the local midwife. His sisters Ida and Edith had also been added to the family by this time.  He had been baptized at St Michael & All Angels Church, attended at Sunday School there and was a member of the Church Choir.  In later years he served as a sidesman and on the Church Council, of which he was Vice Chairman for many years.  On the outbreak of the First World War he served in France with the Somerset Light Infantry from about 1916, transferring later to the Labour Corps.

 

After the war he met and married Olive Jones in about September 1927, who had taught at the local school.  They were married by the Rev T G R Barker in St Michael & all Angels Church and had their reception in the Parish Halls.  They had 3 children Gerald (born 1936), David (born 1937) and Peter (born 1945).  Olive was a constant help and support to Leonard in his church activities both as a member of the Church Council and as Secretary of the Social Committee.  She helped organise the Patronal Socials and arranged the décor for the various Parish Hall Fayres.  During the Second World War she was on the Executive Committee of the Forces Canteen in the Parish Halls and was also a Commandant in the British Red Cross Society.

 

On his return from the First World War, Leonard began to organise dances at the Parish Halls, which continued into the 1960s.  During the Second World War he arranged special dances for the Services every Saturday, which were very popular.  In 1939 he also succeeded Mr Gulley as Secretary for the Parish Halls and became responsible for their general care and upkeep.  With Leslie Partridge, he was one of the two Church Wardens serving at St Michael & All Angels during the war.  In January 1943 he was at the presentation made to Mr Westcott in commemoration of 50 years service as organist and choirmaster.  In January 1944 he received a spoon from a REME soldier, who said he had stolen it from the Church Canteen but felt he could not keep it after they had treated him so well.  Both he and Leslie Partridge were later re-elected to serve another term as Church Wardens in March 1944.

 

Webb, Betty                                                                                                                         23

Betty was born in Bristol about December 1921 to William James & Alice Beatrice Webb (nee Middle) who had married in Bristol in about June 1906.  Her father was born in Easton in Gordano and in 1901 was assisting his father as a stationary engine driver in the local coal pit.  In 1911 her parents were living at 58 Nevil Road in Bishopston, together with her two eldest brothers Sidney and William who were born in 1907 and 1909 respectively.  Her father was working as a clerk for the Bristol Water Works at this time.  Shortly after this her third brother George was born in about September 1911, followed by Peter and Reginald (see below) in about December 1912 and March 1916 respectively.  She also had two sisters – Barbara and Wendy – who were born in September 1914 and March 1920 respectively.  After serving on the Western Front during the First World War, her father returned home to his family in Bishopston where they attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  Some time after this they moved to 47 Ashgrove Road in the Ashley Down area of Bristol, just a few doors down from Frank Saunders – see above.  According to the Hall Mark, Betty was called up by the Women’s Land Army in September 1942. After the war she met and married John Boyd in Bristol about March 1951 and their sons Richard and Robert were born in December 1950 and 1951 respectively.

 

Webb, Dennis                                                                                                                46, 60

He was the only son of Edwin and Elsie Webb (nee Withers) who had married in Shipston on Stour in Warwickshire about June 1919.  His sisters Ellen and Doris were also born in Shipston in about June 1920 and March 1922 respectively.  The family then moved to Bristol where Dennis was born about December 1925.  They family settled in Bishopston during the inter-war years and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Dennis was called up by the Army some time after September 1944 and was serving in India by March 1946.  After the war he met and married Grace Holland in Bristol about March 1947 and their four children – Colin, Pauline, Robert and Geraldine – were born there about June 1948, December 1949, March 1952 and September 1960 respectively.

 

Webb, Peter                                                                                                             18, 26, 28

Brother of Reginald and Betty (see above), he was a signalman in the Royal Navy who was killed in action on the 31st of December 1942 when his minesweeper HMS Bramble was sunk while protecting Convoy JW51B from attack by the German Pocket Battleship Admiral Hipper – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Webb, Reginald                                                                                           19, 34, 46, 47, 57

Brother of Peter and Betty (see above), he was born in Bristol about March 1916.  According to the Hall Mark, he was serving in the Middle East in September 1942 and had met up with Jack Keeping on a rugby pitch in Alexandria by January 1943.  By February 1945 he back home on leave, giving out prizes to the Sunday School.  He also had the banns called for his forthcoming marriage to Beryl Whittaker, which took place in Macclesfield in Cheshire the following April.  He had returned to Bristol permanently by November 1945 and his two eldest children – Judith and Richard – were born there in about June 1949 and June 1955 respectively.  The family later moved to Gloucester and two more children – Caroline and Andrew – were born there about September 1958 and December 1960 respectively.

 

Webb, Vivian                                                                                                                       40

He was killed accidentally while serving with the 12th Airborne Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment during the battle for Honfleur in France on the 24th of August 1944 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Webber, Arthur Edward                                                                                                      16

Arthur was born in Teignmouth in Devon in 1894 to William and Elizabeth Webber and in 1901 they were living at 30 Coombe Road in Teignmouth, together with his brothers George, John and William and his sisters Elizabeth, Emily, Ethel, Alice and Helen.  His father was working as a house painter at this time and his brothers George and John were both errand boys for the local Ironmonger and Grocer respectively.  They were still at this address in 1911, although his sister Hilda and brother Redvers had been added to the family and Arthur was working as an errand boy for a local wine merchant at this time.  When the First World War broke out he joined the RAMC and served in Gallipoli and Salonika from the 12th of September 1915 until he was discharged on the 16th of July 1919.  After leaving the Army he moved to Bristol and was living at 34 Rozel Road in Horfield, from where he attended at St Michael & all Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, he had been an Assistant Scoutmaster with the 61st Bristol Scout Group since 1923 and during the Second World War caused a minor sensation by marrying the local cub mistress (Arvilla Handford – see above) in about September 1942.

 

Webber, Lewis                                                                                                               46, 60

Lewis was born in Bristol about December 1925 the youngest child of Morgan and Ethel Webber (nee Burrows), who had married there in about December 1915.  His father came from Glamorgan and in 1911 he was working underground as a haulier for the local colliery at Gilfach Goch.  However his brother Thomas Webber was boarding with Ethel’s parents at 79 Bell Hill Road in the St Georges area of Bristol at this time.  Thomas was working as a coal hewer in the local colliery, while Ethel was working as a paper finisher.    It was presumably through Thomas that Ethel was introduced to Morgan and hence the family connection with Bristol.

 

Morgan later enlisted in the 10th Battalion of the Welsh Regiment during the First World War and went to France with them on the 14th of December 1915.  They first saw action at the Battle of Albert on the Somme when the Battalion suffered heavy casualties in taking Mametz Wood and were not called on again until the battles of Pilkem and Langemark at Third Ypres in August 1917.  They were eventually disbanded on the 6th of February 1918 when the Division was reduced from 4 to 3 Brigades and he was transferred to the Manchester Regiment.  This suffered heavily in the battles on the Somme in March 1918 and was reduced to a training cadre and did not see any further action until the battle of Cambrai and the advance in Picardy in October.

 

After the war Morgan and Ethel settled in Bristol and Lewis’ sisters – Vera and Queenie (see below) –were born there in about June 1917 and September 1919 respectively followed by Lewis’ older brother Vincent in about December 1920.  During this time the family settled in Bishopston and attended at St Michael and All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Lewis was called up by the Army some time after September 1944 and was serving with the CMF by March 1946.  After completing his National Service he met and married Olive Walker in Bristol about September 1949 and their son Michael was born there about October 1951

 

Webber, Miss   [Queenie]                                                                                                  22

Sister of Lewis (see above), she was born in Bristol about September 1919.  According to the Hall Mark she was running the Brownies with Marion Brace in January 1943.  After the war she met and married Denver Baglow in Newton Abbot in Devon and their daughters Geraldine and Christine were born there about March 1953 and March 1956 respectively.

 

Weeks, Arthur                                                                                       17, 18, 20, 41, 53, 59

Arthur was born in Bristol about March 1917 to Arthur and Ada Weeks (nee West), who had married there about July 1912.  His older brother Frederick was also born in Bristol about December 1912.  In 1911 his father was living at 25 Sussex Street in the St Phillips area of Bristol, where he was running his own grocery business.  His mother came from Easton and was working as a cardboard box maker for the Caxtons Printing Works at this time.  His father joined the RASC before the War and went to France on the 19th of November 1914, where served as a driver with the horsed transport.

 

According to the Hall Mark, Arthur was called up by the Navy during the Second World War and was serving on an Aircraft Carrier by September 1942.  He had been commissioned by January 1943 and was serving on one of the little minesweepers off the French coast during the D Day invasion in June 1944.  He told the Rev Hall that he had a girl in every port but then explained that this was only through a telescope.  By July 1945 he was serving in the Far East and had taken part in the relief of Hong Kong by March 1946.  After completing his National Service he returned to Bristol where he met and married Heather Lovell in Bristol about March 1949.  I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Weeks, Raymond                                                                                                                 41

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was serving in Burma with the 14th Army by September 1944.

 

Welch, Ray                                                                                                              41, 56, 60

Ray was born in Bristol about December 1917 to Daniel and Beatrice Welch (nee Milton), who had married there about March 1916.  His sister Joyce was also born in Bristol about June 1921.  During the Second World War Ray met and married Constance Bugler in Bridport in Dorset about June 1941 and their son Michael was later born in Bristol about December 1942.  According to the Hall Mark, Ray was serving with the 14th Army in Burma by September 1944 and by November 1945 had been posted as a Staff Captain to SEAC Headquarters in Malaya.  By March 1946 he was in India serving as the Deputy Assistant Director of Army Welfare Services.

 

Were, the Rev Peter                                                                                                             29

I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark notes that he was a former Isle of Wight camper with whom the Rev Hall spent 5 days holiday in July 1943. This took place at Peter’s Vicarage in Ropely, where the Rev Hall found time to help out with the choir boys outing.

 

West, Alfred (“Dr Pest”)                                                                                         30, 34, 41

Alfred was born in Bristol about June 1917 to Alfred and Agnes West (nee Harvey), who had married in Wells in Somerset about October 1913.  His sister Violet was also born in Wells about March 1914.  The family settled in the Bishopston area of Bristol between the wars and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  Here Alfred joined the local 61st Bristol Scout Group and later attended many of the Isle of Wight camps (see above).  During the Second World War he moved to live in Wells in Somerset where he met and married Audrey Vincent about June 1940 and his eldest son Robert was born there about December 1942.  He continued to correspond with the Rev Hall and according to the Hall Mark, he was serving with the YMCA in North Africa by September 1943.  He later met up with Peter Storkey (see above) in a YMCA Canteen in Tunis about January 1944 and by September was serving with the YMCA in Italy, where he presumably remained for the rest of the war.  After the war he returned to Wells where his youngest son Barry was born about September 1946 followed by his daughter Germaine in March 1951.

 

West, Keith                                                                                                  34, 38, 45, 46, 54

Keith was born in Bristol about March 1924 to Frederick and Rose West (nee Jenkins), who had married there in about September 1918.  His sister Margaret was also born in Bristol about March 1921.  According to the Hall Mark, Keith was called up by the Royal Navy about January 1944 and had been posted to Portsmouth by the following March, where he was singing with the Cathedral Choir when off duty.  He had also returned home on leave that Christmas, where he read one of the lessons for the Carol Service.  By February 1945 he had been promoted to the rank of Sub Lieutenant in the FAA and returned to Bristol to marry Joan Elizabeth Hart (see under Betty Hart above) the following March.  They later had two children – Ian and Linda – who were born about December 1947 and December 1949 respectively.

 

Westaway, Norman                                                                                                             19

Although I have not been able to trace his parents, the records show that Norman was born in Bristol about June 1916 and that his mother’s maiden name was Hucker.  His brother Phillip (see below) was also born in Bristol about March 1918.  According to the Hall Mark both brothers were called up during the early years of the Second World War and were serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  Norman does not appear to have married nor had any children after the war had ended.

 

Westaway, Phillip                                                                                                                19

Brother of Norman (see above), he was born in Bristol about March 1918.  Like his brother he was also serving in the Middle East by September 1942.  After the war he later met and married Pamela Ashford in Bristol about June 1960, although I have not managed to trace any children from this marriage.

 

Westcott, Daisy                                                                                                       11, 21, 31

Daisy Muriel Westcott was born in Bristol about July 1898 to William Edmund and Kate Eliza Westcott (nee Barber), who had married in Keynsham about September 1895.  She had an older brother Edmund who was born in Bristol about 1896 and a younger sister Violet who was born about 1900.  In 1901 they were living at 17 Nottingham Road in the Bishopston area of Bristol and her father was working as an insurance clerk at that time.  However by 1911 they had moved to 114 Kennington Avenue where her parents were to remain for the rest of their lives.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where her father was the organist and choirmaster for many years – see below.  Her brother Edmund joined the 10th Battalion of the Royal West Kents as a 2nd Lieutenant during the First World War and went with them France in May 1916, where he saw action at the battles of the Somme, Messines and 3rd Ypres before being wounded.  He later finished the war as a Lieutenant with the Labour Corps.   After the war he was living at 83 Hampton Park in the Redland area of Bristol about 1921 but later moved to Newton Abbot in Devon, where he met and married Kathleen Pocock about January 1930.  Their daughters Sylvia and Maureen were subsequently born there about September 1930 and June 1934 respectively.

 

Daisy herself was the superintendant of the Infant Sunday School for many years from about 1931.  The Hall Mark notes that the infants enjoyed an excellent Christmas party in 1942 with jellies, “Away in a Manger” and Father Christmas and were to enjoy the same again in Christmas 1943.  Daisy and her sister Violet also took over as the Rev Hall’s housekeepers during the war and remained with him until he left to take up a new post in Nigeria. Daisy was also one of the few Sunday School Teachers who had not been called up by March 1941.  She lived with her father and mother at 114 Kennington Avenue for many years until her mother died in June 1956 aged 86.  Some time after this she moved to live in Tiverton in Devon where she eventually died about June 1971.

 

Westcott, W E B “Paddy”                                                                        12, 16, 22, 53, 61

Father of Daisy, William Edmund Westcott was born in Clifton about July 1869 to William and Clara Matilda Westcott (nee Baber), who had married there about October 1868.  In 1871 they were living at 69 Claremont Street in Clifton and his father was working as a Solicitor’s Shorthand Writer at this time.  By 1881 the family had moved to 4 Walton Terrace in Westbury on Trym and his brothers Hubert (1874) and George (1878) had been added to the family.  They also had a domestic servant Emily Bailey

aged 18 living in residence.  His father was working as a Solicitor’s Cashier at this time.  By 1891 they had moved back to Clifton (at 4 Nugent Villas) and had a new servant – Florence Gardiner aged 15 – living with them.  Sadly his brother George had died about December 1887 aged 9 but “Paddy” had just started work as an insurance clerk. Shortly after this, he first started work as church organist and choirmaster at St Michael & All Angels Church in Bishopston on the 10th of October 1892 and went on to train more young choristers for the St Michael’s and Bristol Cathedral Choirs then any other local choirmaster.

 

He later married his cousin Kate Eliza Baber in Keynsham about September 1895 and was living at 17 Nottingham Road in the Bishopston area of Bristol when his son Edmund Joseph was born about 1887, followed by his daughters Daisy (July 1898) and Violet (1900).  By 1911 they had moved to 114 Kennington Avenue also in Bishopston where he remained for the rest of his life.  After watching his children grow up and having seen his son come through the First World War safely, he continued as organist and choirmaster at St Michael & All Angels Church for many years.  He was greatly respected by the choristers who served under him, although he was a strict disciplinarian and had a fiery temper when things did not go quite as well as they should.

 

He did not allow the Second World War to distract him from his duties and gained a reputation for himself by continuing to play the organ and leading the hymn singing during the first bombing raid on Bristol.  This was a turning point, however, and failing health meant that he had to give up playing the organ by September 1941, though he continued his work as choirmaster.  By September 1942 he had completed 50 years in this post and a collection was organised to present him with a fine illuminated address and 50 guineas in Savings Certificates to mark this achievement.  This was duly presented in November and reported in the Bristol Evening Post on the 17th of October.  However, his poor health meant that he was confined to his home and it had to be a quiet affair.  Therefore only the 2 churchwardens and senior chorister present when the Rev Hall presented these gifts to Paddy at his home.  His wife Kate was also presented with a cut glass bowl.  Sadly “Paddy” did not live to see the war’s end and died about December 1944.  Mr Lumbard (see above) had taken over Paddy’s duties on a temporary basis from about January 1943 until Leonard Fluck (see above) arrived to take permanent charge in March 1946.

 

White, Harry                                                                                                                 18, 34

Harry was born in Bristol about September 1913 the eldest son of Reginald Francis and Winifred White (nee Kerslake), who had married in Bristol in about June 1911.  In April 1911 his mother was living with her parents at 7 Sefton Park Road in St Andrews, while his father came from Chichester and was boarding with Trixie Bond’s parents (see above) at 26 Nottingham Road in Bishopston.  He was working as a litho pressman for a local print works at the time.  Harry was the eldest of 5 children and was followed by Winifred (September 1914), Frederick (June 1918), Herbert (March 1920) and Noel (January 1923) who was killed in action in Normandy – see below.

 

They lived in Bishopston between the wars and attended at St Michael & all Angels Church, where Noel sang in the choir.  Harry later moved to Cheltenham where he met and married Joan Steed in about June 1939 and their son James was born there about December 1940.  Harry was called up by the Army during the early months of the Second World War and posted to Singapore, where he was wounded when the Japanese attacked in December 1941.  He was safely evacuated to India and was still there in September 1942 but was back home and invalided out of the Army by January 1943.  He returned to his wife in Cheltenham, where their daughter was born in about March 1945.  After the war his parents also moved away from Bristol and were living in Longton in Monmouthshire.

 

White, Jack                                                                                                                6, 19, 30

Jack was born in Bristol about September 1920 to James E and Maud J White (nee Harper).  He was the eldest of 3 children, with the other two (Joan and James) being born about September 1922 and September 1927 respectively.  The family moved to Bishopston during the inter-war years and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Jack became a member of the choir.  He joined the RAF before the war and was on home service by March 1940.  He later met and married Alicia Butler in Bristol about October 1942.  He was posted overseas shortly thereafter and was serving in the Middle East by September 1943.  After the war he returned to Bristol where his sons Nicholas and Anthony were born about December 1954 and March 1959 respectively.

 

White, Muriel                                                                                                                       23

Muriel was born in Bishopston about September 1916 to Richard Thomas and Mabel White (nee Ryall) who had married while her father was serving in the Army.  Her brother George followed in about December 1918.  In April 1911 her father was living with his parents at 12 Logan Road in Bishopston and working as a rate collector for the Bristol Waterworks Company.  Her mother was living at 27 Beauchamp Road in Bishopston at this time and, with her brother Bert, was helping her elder brother Henry in running his photography business.

 

Muriel’s father served in France with the Somerset Light Infantry during the latter years of the First World War.  At some point he was wounded and subsequently transferred to the Gloucestershire Regiment but was later discharged on health grounds.  Her maternal uncle – Albert Ryall – was killed in the fighting near Ypres on the 2nd of August 1918 –see the Parish Roll of Honour (1914-18) for further details.  Shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War, Muriel decided to take up nursing with the Volunteer Aid Detachment and was serving in a hospital away from Bristol by January 1943.  After the war she met and married Donald Roper in Grimsby in Lincolnshire about December 1945 and their son Michael was born there in about September 1951.

 

White, Noel                                                                                                              22, 30, 40

Brother of Harry, he served in the Middle East with the 8th Army from about January 1943 and was killed in action on the 10th of June 1944 while serving with the 5th RTR in the tank assault on the village of Tilly sur Suelles in Normandy – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

White, Stuart                                                                                                            22, 34, 53

He was born in Bristol about December 1921 to Richard and Margaret White (nee Stile).  His older sister Barbara had also been born there in about March 1917.  The family settled in Bishopston during the inter-war years and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church, where Stuart sang in the choir.  He was called up by the Army early in the war and had been posted overseas by about January 1943.  He was serving in India by January 1944 and was still there in July 1945.  By this time he had become a sort of “Assistant Chaplain” to the Padre, evoking happy memories of days with the choir led by “Paddy” Westcott (see above).  After the war he returned to Bristol where he met and married Audrey Arthur about September 1949 and their children David and Patricia were born there about March 1958 and June 1960 respectively

 

Wicks, Mrs                                                                                                                           11

Although I Have not been able to trace her family history the Hall Mark notes that she was one of the few Sunday School Teachers who had not been called up by March 1941.

 

Wicks, Jean                                                                                                                         22

Jean was born in Bristol about September 1925 the only child of William George and Eva Wicks (nee Tucker), who had married there about December 1912.  Both her parents were school teachers and in 1911 here father was living in Ashley Road and her mother was living with her parents at 2 Manor Road in Bishopston, where father and brothers worked at the family carpentry business.  By 1917 her parents were living at 5 Kent Road in Bishopston.  On the outbreak of war her father joined the RAMC on the 16th of September 1914 and was posted to the South Midland Field Ambulance of the 48th (South Midland) Division.  He went with them to France on the 13th of March 1915 and served through the battles of the Somme and the advance to the Hindenburg line before being discharged on health grounds on the 16th of August 1917.

 

The family later moved to Nottingham Road in Bishopston during the inter war years and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Jean was helping Margaret Tiley to run the Guides by January 1943 and later spent the war years with the WLA.  After the war she met and married Ray Cooper (see above) in Bristol about March 1950 and their daughters Jane, Claire and Verity were born there about June 1952, March 1955 and March 1959 respectively.  The newly weds lived at their new home on Kings Drive from where they both became actively involved in the Pigsty Hill Drama Group (the Orchard Players) appearing in many pantomimes and plays in the Church Hall.  Unfortunately Ray died in about July 2003 but Jean is still living in Henbury.

 

Wilkins, Mr J                                                                                                                 16, 22

I have not been able to trace his family history but according to the Hall Mark he was the senior chorister in the church choir and was responsible for organising the collection and presentation of the parting gift to the church organist “Paddy” Westcott – see above.

 

 

Wilkins, Lionel                                                                                                         34

Lionel was born in Bristol about December 1915 the youngest son of Harold and Florence May Wilkins (nee Lintern), who had married there in about March 1906.  His older brother Wilfred was also born in Bristol about December 1908.  In April 1911 his family was living at 466 Gloucester Road in Horfield but later moved to 8 Church Road in the same Parish.  His father was working as a joiner for a firm of organ builders at this time.  The family attended at St Michael & All Angels Church during the inter war years and according to the Hall Mark, Lionel was serving as a Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery by January 1944.  After the war he moved to Bath where he met and married Daisy Jewell in about July 1946 and their daughter Ann was born there about March 1947.

 

Willis, Arthur                                                                                                                       19

Arthur was born in Bristol about December 1921 to Thomas and Hilda Willis (nee Francis), who had married there about December 1918.  His brother David was also born in Bristol some years later in about March 1924.  His father had served in France with the British Red Cross Society from the 7th of August 1915 until the end of the war probably as part of the VAD motorized ambulance convoy, although he may also have helped in recording and locating the wounded and missing.  According to the Hall Mark, Arthur was serving in the Middle East in September 1942.  After the war he returned to Bristol and married Phyllis Lovell in about October 1947 and they had two children – Peter and Christine – who were born in Bristol about June 1948 and September 1950 respectively.

 

Willis, Richard                                                                                                         28

Richard Hampton Willis was born in Bristol about 1920 and died in a road accident on the 20th of December 1939, while serving with the ground crew at RAF Newmarket in Cambridgeshire – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Withers, Claude                                                                                                                   56

Claude was born in Bristol about June 1922 to Walter and Ivy Withers (nee Harris), who had married there about March 1921.  His sister Monica was also born in Bristol about June 1929.  According to the Hall Mark, Claude joined the RAF during the Second World War and had been awarded a DFC by November 1945.  He later met and married Joan Burns in Weston Super Mare in about March 1945 and settled in Bristol where their son Peter was born about September 1947.

 

Woodland, John                                                                                                34, 45, 60, 61

John was born in Bristol about June 1923 the only child of Alfred and Claudia Woodland (nee Kingman), who had married there about September 1921.  According to the Hall Mark, John joined the RAF during the Second World War and was serving as a sergeant in Bomber Command by January 1944.  By February 1945 he had completed his tour of bombing operations and was serving as an Instructor, while writing poetry in his spare time.  By March 1946 he had signed on for an extra period of service with the RAF.  The previous December he had also helped Leonard May (see above) entertain 250 poor children at their Christmas Party by playing for them on his accordion.   After the war he met and married Winifred Williams (nee Gough) in Bristol about March 1949.  I have not been able to trace any children from this second marriage.

 

However, Winifred already had a 14 year old son – David (born in Bristol about December 1935) – by her previous marriage to Philip Williams in September 1931.  Philip had been a fireman in the Merchant Navy and had gone down with his ship (the SS Pandias) in the South Atlantic when it was sunk by U-107 (Kapitanleutnan Gunther Hessler) carrying military supplies and 11 Spitfires to the port of Alexandria in Egypt.  The U-107 was itself lost in the Bay of Biscay with all its 58 crew members when it was depth charged by a British Sunderland from 201 Squadron on the 18th of April 1944.

 

Woodroffe, Doreen                                                                                                        23, 47

Dorreen was born in Bristol about September 1923 to Albert and May Woodroffe (nee Goodridge), who had married there about December 1921.  Her brother David and sister Mary were also born in Bristol about December 1927 and September 1933 respectively.  Her father was a regular soldier and went to France with the 6th Dragoon Guards on the 6th of August and was present at all the major cavalry actions on the Western Front culminating in the capture of Mons in November 1918.  According to the Hall Mark, Doreen was serving with the Women’s Land Army by January 1943 and later married an American soldier (Don Baxter) in St Michael & All Angels Church about October 1944.  Their son Dudley was born the following June and the family later migrated to America on the Queen Mary arriving in New York on the 18th of March 1946.  The family later moved to California where Doreen received her naturalization papers on the 11th of November 1954.  I have not been able to trace whether they had any other children.

 

Wookey, Harry                                                                                                              19, 34

Harry Frederick Wookey and his twin brother William were born in Bristol on the 10th of March 1891 to Henry Wimbledon and Alice Wookey (nee Philpot).  His family was living at 2a South View in the Ashley Vale area of Bristol at this time and his father was working as a draper’s assistant.  By 1901 the family had moved to 21 Salthrop Road in Bishopston and by this time included his sisters Ada and Violet.  They also had a domestic servant – Sarah Greeley aged 17 – living in residence.  His father had also changed his job and was working from home as a commission agent.  By 1914 the family had moved again and was living at 20 Longmead Avenue in Bishopston.  Both Harry and his brother William served as choristers in St Michael & All Angels Church choir, while their father was a Sunday School Teacher there.  Harry also used to play scrum half for Bristol Rugby Club before 1914.  He later married Lucy Clark in Bristol about April 1916 but I have not been able to trace any children from this marriage.

 

As a qualified doctor Harry served in France as an honorary quartermaster and lieutenant of the South Midland Field Ambulance during the First World War.  He first went to France on the 29th of June 1916 (Bristol Times & Mirror, 6th of July 1916) and later transferred to the RAMC in Mesopotamia.  However, his twin brother William died in the same war – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1914-18) for further details.  After the war he resumed his career as a doctor which included a spell in Beira in Mozambique – returning to London on the 22nd of September 1933 via the SS Mulbera of the British India Shipping Company.

 

By 1939 Harry was back in the Army and, according to the Hall Mark, saw action during the evacuations from Norway in May 1940 and Crete in June 1941.  In the latter action his ship was torpedoed and he spent 5 days in an open boat before being picked up by a German submarine and taken prisoner to Casablanca.  He eventually escaped from there to America and by September 1942 was back in the Middle East.  By January 1944 he was back home with the rank of Colonel.  While on home leave he also took the opportunity to call in on the Rev Hall to thank him for his letters.   After the war he once again resumed his medical career, which again took him overseas and he is recorded as returning to Southampton from Durban in South Africa on the 29th of July 1955 via the SS Pretoria Castle of the Union Castle Mail Steamship Company.  At some point after this he moved to Ealing in Middlesex where he died about June 1974

 

Wookey, Alfred James “Ted”                                                                                 11, 17, 46

Known to his friends as Ted, Alfred was born in Bedminster about December 1897 to Alfred and Florence Wookey and in 1901 they were living at 21 St Judes Crescent in Bedminster, together with his baby sister Florence May (born March 1901).  His father was working as railway porter at this time.  Sadly his father died in about June 1903 and his mother later remarried to George Fenn in about March 1910.  He had also been previously married to Addie Louise Rowe who had died about September 1904 about a year after his daughter Doris was born in September 1903.  In 1901 they were living at 13 Moreton Street in St Pauls and George was working as a gas pipe layer at this time. Ted meanwhile was still at school but working part time as an errand boy.

 

Ted served in France with the Gloucestershire and Manchester Regiments during the later years of the First World War.  After the war he settled in Horfield and later became Hon Secretary of the St Michael & All Angels Boys Club in 1931 and of the Girls Club in June 1936. He lived at 14 Brent Road in Horfield and later married Maud Spiller in about December 1941, although I have not managed to trace any children from this marriage.  According to the Hall Mark was helping as a Sunday School Teacher in March 1941 and was still doing so in September 1942.  He also helped the Rev Hall run a Junior Cadet Company of 45 boys and by Easter 1944 had assumed complete command of the Company following the Rev Hall’s resignation due to pressure of other work.  The Company was still going strong in February 1945.

 

Wrench, Eric                                                                                                                       47

Eric was born in Bristol about December 1915 to Edward and Nellie Ann Wrench (nee Lowe) who had married in Belper in Derbyshire about June 1909.  He had two brothers Cyril and Roy (see below) who were born in Bristol about September 1913 and September 1917 respectively, and an older sister Dorothy who was born about January 1911.  In 1911 his parents and baby Dorothy were living at 4 Longmead Avenue in Horfield and his father was working as a commercial traveler for an asphalt manufacturer.  His maternal aunt Maggie Elizabeth Lowe (aged 19) was also living with them at this time.  The family settled in Bishopston between the wars and attended at St Michael & All Angels Church.  According to the Hall Mark, Eric was one of several persons married by the Rev Hall in the 6 months before February 1945.  In his case this was to Margery Pitt in about December 1944.   They then moved to London where their daughters Elizabeth and Patricia were born about September 1945 and June 1948 respectively.

 

Wrench, Roy                                                                                                                  19, 52

Brother of Eric (see above), he was serving in the Middle East in September 1942 and was back home on leave by July 1945.  After the war he met and married Erica Watts in Weston Super Mare about September 1948 and they went on to have four children – Sally, Susan, Jonathon and Nicholas – who were born in Bristol about September 1950, December 1952, September 1955 and September 1960 respectively.

 

Wright, Jimmy                                                                                                               15, 28

He was a training to be an RAF pilot in Canada when he was killed in a flying accident on the 16th of November 1941 – see the Parish Roll of Honour (1939-45) for further details.

 

Wright, the Rev W H L (“Uncle Bill”)                                                          7, 12, 25, 41, 45

Although I have not been able to trace his family history, the Hall Mark records that he was a former Isle of Wight camper and colleague of the Rev Hall.  He was serving in Scotland as Chaplain to the RAF in March 1940 and was still there in September 1941.  By March 1943 he was staying with the Rev Hall and the following year his daughter was born at H Hour on D Day the 6th of June, just as he was about to embark for France.  By February 1945 he was serving with the BLA in Germany.

 

Wyatt, John                                                                                                                         18

Unfortunately I have not been able to trace his family history but the Hall Mark records that he was called up by the Navy and was serving at sea by September 1942.